Whole Leaf Tobacco
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 40
  1. #1
    Founder FmGrowit's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Freedom, Ohio, United States
    Posts
    4,527


    Industrial/resourceful entrepreneur's and product developers wanted

    There will be several new forums introduced here in the near future.

    One of the forum categories will be "Products". I'd like someone to put together all of the components needed for making a personal sized fermentor or curing chamber, build a fermentor from those parts, test it and if successful, market the components in the "Products" forum.

    Some members might have access to some of the components, but not all. Some members might be able to build a component. However it works out, I believe there is a market for a standardized fermentor. It would be a lot easier to teach someone "how to" if our equipment was at least similar.

    Please understand that by doing the legwork in designing, testing and resourcing, you're going to be giving up a lot of your work to someone who could borrow your information and find the components himself. I think in the long run, you'd come out ahead though.

    This opportunity is extended to all other aspects of "Products" associated with growing, curing, processing and finishing tobacco and any other related aspect of tobacco.

    The "products" forum will not be open for comments, nor will just anyone be allowed to post items. Only approved items will be allowed...and I have the right to restrict too much competition for the same item or remove inferior products or over sold items.

    ...and you have to be an established member of the forum to be considered for selling in the "Products" forum.

    Any questions about the process, post them here or send me a PM.

    Thanks,
    Don

  2. #2
    redneck grower Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    FLORIDA
    Posts
    4,580


    Industrial/resourceful entrepreneur's and product developers wanted

    i plan on making one this weekend,,,, i will document it,,,,

    and you can do with the pictures what you want,,,,

    the only thing im gonna be stumped on is hooking a hot water heater thermostat up to it,,,,{ i know nothing of electricity} but got a friend that may wire it all up for me,,,

  3. #3
    Administrator deluxestogie's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    near Blacksburg, VA
    Posts
    9,585


    Industrial/resourceful entrepreneur's and product developers wanted

    This is a generic design for a 2'x2'x4' kiln box. The scaling is for 2"x2" and 2"x3" members (real measurement). If the panels are plank or plywood, then no diagonal braces are really needed at this size. If building this of wood, the parts will be less affected by humidity if the parts are attached using brass wood screws.

    It shows a general location for a water heater thermostat, the back of which must be exposed to the interior. A notch is shown for running electrical wire into the box.

    The door is elevated from touching the floor by the thickness of the kiln floor. Any hinges can be used, but the design provides room for a brass piano hinge along the length of the door.

    Insulation can be added to the interior (between the posts and diagonals) or as sheet to the exterior, including the bottom.

    The edge of the box that makes contact with the door should be fitted with folded PVC weather strip all around.

    For safety, the thermostat exterior should be covered by a plastic utility service box large enough to cut out its back (and provided with a means of locking or otherwise securing it, if children may be around it). The remaining back flange of the utility box is then drilled and screwed onto the side of the kiln.

    The dimensions chosen are large enough to accommodate hanging leaf, while still allowing room for a Crockpot at the bottom. Interior hardware is whatever seems convenient for you--wire, hooks, rod, shelves.

    Any comments are welcome (even harsh words).

    Bob

    EDIT: The thought just occurred to me that if the unit described is considered a module, and provided with removable side walls and lid, then multiple units could be bolted together to create, for example, a double-wide or double-height kiln, with double doors. With bolts and wing-nuts attaching adjacent modules, the larger assembly could be separated for moving. The lid can also be hinged for top access. The fewer exterior walls for the same enclosed volume would increase thermal efficiency. All the components could probably be cut and pre-drilled as a kit.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails kilnFrame_2x2x4.jpg   kiln_diagBraces.jpg   kiln_doorframeAdded.jpg   kiln_panelsAdded.jpg   kilnComplete_a.jpg  

    kiln_hingeGap.jpg   kiln_doorBottomClearance.jpg   kiln_wiringNotch.jpg   kiln_thermostatHole.jpg   kiln_utilityBox.jpg  

    Last edited by deluxestogie; 09-04-2011 at 12:06 AM. Reason: Fixed mislabeled graphic

  4. #4
    Banned
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    539


    Industrial/resourceful entrepreneur's and product developers wanted

    I have a small Kiln design that I already know works very well. I would have to work on the components to improve there availability. most of them are sold by Home Depot.
    I did have a couple of pieces that where scrounged and would have to come up with something that someone could get pretty much anywhere. For example a Styrofoam box. I got mine from a medical school. A Styrofoam ice chest would be an acceptable substitute. Other components are a water heater thermostat. Computer power source and fan. A bottle lamp kit from Home depot and a light bulb. I also incorporate a method that allows very tight heat control with the water heater stat. beyond that is a container to hold water that is the correct size for producing the desired humidity. Sorry but that one you have to experiment with as it differs with location and climate conditions.

    I am working on a large refrigerator size kiln as well. still tinkering with it and it is presenting some problems that the smaller version did not have.

    Once I have it working it could be designed for commonly available materials as well.

  5. #5
    Moderator Jitterbugdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Northeast Maryland
    Posts
    3,893


    Industrial/resourceful entrepreneur's and product developers wanted

    Bob, I think it would help if you mentioned how much tobacco ( just a ball park figure) this size kiln will hold. You'll have some people thinking it will only hold 10 leaves, whiles others might think it will hold 250 plants!
    Randy B

  6. #6
    Senior Member dkh2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Southern Washington State I can see Oregon from my front yard and Mt. St. Helens to the North
    Posts
    556


    Industrial/resourceful entrepreneur's and product developers wanted

    I like this thread.
    Now if you could take it a step further and show the insulation and
    different types that would be prudent for a Kiln.

  7. #7
    Administrator deluxestogie's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    near Blacksburg, VA
    Posts
    9,585


    Industrial/resourceful entrepreneur's and product developers wanted

    Quote Originally Posted by Jitterbugdude View Post
    I think it would help if you mentioned how much tobacco...
    Randy,
    The generic design was intended to allow it to be scaled to any length or height, up to probably double their current dimension, without using heavier members and bracing.

    At the currently displayed size, the leaf hanging area is 2'x2', with at least 3' of leaf length. This could accommodate two parallel hanging rows of wilted leaf (2 two-foot rows). It filled with smaller, Oriental leaf, then probably two tiers of leaf would also fit (4 two-foot rows). How many leaves? That is entirely dependent on the thickness of the central vein.

    If the design is doubled-up laterally, by attaching two modules side-to-side, then it would double all that. It is likely that the heat/humidity source for one module would be sufficient for both connected modules, if a fan were included.

    I'm pondering the various ways of connecting all the members, so that it would be easily modifiable. I'm also making up a list of possible materials for the frame as well as the sheathing and insulation. With just the diagonally braced framework, the entire thing could be sheathed with 2" Styrofoam, except for the bottom. It would be fragile, but I'm sure it would work.

    More later.

    Bob

  8. #8
    redneck grower Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    FLORIDA
    Posts
    4,580


    Industrial/resourceful entrepreneur's and product developers wanted

    ^^^^^^^^^

    that is exactlly what im going to do,,,,,bump a cabinet up to a allready existing one,,,,

    it's going on tonight,,,, pics to follow,,,

  9. #9
    Founder FmGrowit's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Freedom, Ohio, United States
    Posts
    4,527


    Industrial/resourceful entrepreneur's and product developers wanted

    I've been working on packaging processes and materials and have been thinking about what problems mold is going to present in sealed bags. The bags are expected to keep the tobacco in medium case for at least a year. These are some pretty heavy duty vapor proof, FDA approved, thermoplastic bags, but if the mold spores are in the bag, they could begin to grow if the bags are kept at the wrong temperature. So, I though maybe some type of pasteurization would resolve the issue. This chart might be helpful with using a kiln/fermentor.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails mold_heat_chart.jpg  

  10. #10
    Administrator deluxestogie's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    near Blacksburg, VA
    Posts
    9,585


    Industrial/resourceful entrepreneur's and product developers wanted

    FmGrowit,
    As you know, mold spores are and will always be present in all tobacco. If a food (or tobacco) is Pasteurized, that is only effective until the packaging is opened. Then the contents are re-exposed to ubiquitous organisms. The temps in the chart are precariously close to the denaturing temp of tobacco oxidase (149ºF, and I don't know the duration of exposure required to bring it about). Also, I believe such temps would significantly darken the leaf, and alter its aroma and flavor. I suppose you could try it, and see what you get. Perhaps a different approach would be to aim at storing leaf in the bags at low case (60-65% RH), which would inhibit mold growth.

    A problem either way, since the RH is dependent on the ambient temperature, is that variations in storage temperature inversely vary the RH. In the range of 50 to 80ºF, a 20ºF drop will nearly double the RH. (Cheese caves are kept in the neighborhood of 50ºF, and this does not inhibit mold growth.)

    With regard to more usual kiln temperatures, I've run mine between 120ºF and 130ºF, averaging about 127ºF. I consider 140ºF as the upper limit for the kiln.

    Bob

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Comment via Facebook