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  1. #21
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    Bob, A couple of comments. Your heat sources are nice, but also expensive. a light bulb will do the job. On the expensive side of that issue, but extremely reliable. is something like this.

    This one was priced at $26 but is made to produce nothing but heat from the power. No wasted energy on light, lol.

    The water heater thermostat actually can be used for temps to 200 degrees plus. It is an issue of placement of the thermostat. Here is the explanation. The stat is not intended to be used in direct contact with the environment (or heat) it is regulating. But sets on the outside surface of the tank the hot water is in. The outside surface is not as hot as the water inside. The stat is set to regulate the temp of the water by the relative temp of the outside surface. not by a direct contact with the water. Lets say I hav the stat set to keep water in the tank at 120 degrees. If I then move the stat without changing any settings even a small distance from the tank. the temperature it keeps the water at will rise. in this case very likely by a huge degree. Air is a poor conductor of heat in comparison to metal.
    In the same way I can raise the temperature of the kiln by moving the thermostat further from the heat source. I will gain a lesser among of temperature rise due to the stat being in direct contact with the heated environment. There is also an increase in temperature fluctuation as the stat gets further away.
    I learned this while trying to build my first egg incubator The temperature in them must be very well controlled. You need 99.5 degrees that will remain steady for 21 days. if the temperature falls below 94 degrees or rises above 102 degrees the embryos will be lost. I had to place the stat very close to and actually above the heat source to gain a temperature that held steady at 99.5 degrees plus or minus 2 degrees for 21 days. moving the stat a foot or so away from the heat source would cause it to jump up around 120 degrees but have a huge fluctuation of 110 to 120 degrees. moving it even further would increase the temp even more as well as the fluctuation.

    You could get a higher but less fluctuating temp by simply adding a plate to the back of the stat as well. Basically insulating it from direct exposure to the air. IN my case i actually used a dremel tool to cut away the black case giving more exposure to the air for the metal plate inside.

    The above also illustrates the importance of exact instructions for some. A list of components will leave many with a bag of goodies they really have no idea what to do with. Instructions with photos of exactly how to construct the kiln will go a long way.

  2. #22
    Moderator Jitterbugdude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel View Post
    This one was priced at $26 but is made to produce nothing but heat from the power. No wasted energy on light, lol.
    100 watts is 100 watts. It doesn't matter if you have a light bulb or a ceramic bulb, if they are both rated at 100 watts, then that's what they will draw.

  3. #23
    Administrator deluxestogie's Avatar
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    The heating components I discussed for a flue-cure kiln are rated for a much higher heat output than needed for a fermenting kiln. The temp inside the flue-cure chamber would need to reach and hold a temp as high as 191ºF. I also have some concern about the use of a powerful light source to reach such temps while heating organic matter. Various frequencies of light generate some pretty nasty photolytic pyrogens that are not produced by the heat alone.

    That last concern aside, since you could simply place the light inside an opaque metal cover, whatever source that can generate the required heat in a reasonable time will get the job done.

    Bob

  4. #24
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    Regarding microbes and mould, has anyone experimented with colloidal silver as a spray for leaves?

    Microbes hate it and it is quite easy to make.

  5. #25
    Moderator Jitterbugdude's Avatar
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    The problem with colloidal silver is that it would most likely kill ALL of the microbes, including the ones that are needed for fermentation.

  6. #26
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    100 watts is 100 watts of Power, the question is what is it being converted to. In this case we want it converted to Heat, not Light. Teh power lost in making light is a waste. It was also a joke since the loss of power to light generation is insignificant. Hince the (LoL). It has actually been desirable to invent the light bulb that does not waste power making heat ever since the light bulb was invented. The joke is that this is a reversal on that desire. Incandescent bulbs are a supreme example of wasting energy producing the wrong stuff (Heat)

  7. #27
    Administrator deluxestogie's Avatar
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    It depends on what you want. Remember that the Easy Bake Oven used a light bulb for baking.

    Bob

  8. #28
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    Bob, I started to reply to your previous post, in regard to reaching close to 200 degree temps. My estimation is that you could achieve this with 250 watts of power in a refrigerator size kiln. I know you can do it with 500 watts. That estimation is taking into consideration reasonable insulation and weather sealing even though the kiln is in an outside (cold) environment) indoors in a more stable environment would improve the results. Just some ball park figures that I have found in tinkering around.

  9. #29
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    well. I'm gonna throw out some suggestions, or general comments.
    I'm thinking of building another larger (than what I have) fermenting kiln, and I'm a super tightwad, and looking at el cheapo way to get a satisfactory kiln. I also want it light-weight, so I can easily move it or drag it from room-to-room or to my outside shed.

    I want it 4+ ft wide, so I can hang my 4 ft strings of cured tobacco in it, and not more than 2'-6" deep (I figure I can get 3 or 4 strings hanging in one level), and so it will fit through any interior door. And I want it 5+ ft high so I can double stack the hanging tobacco and have room for the crockpot below.

    Going to build with a frame, similar to that of 'deluxestogie's. Will use 2x2's for corner/main frame, and 1x2's for cross and intermediate framing, and door frame(?), screwed, nailed and glued. Will use an old hollow-core wood interior door, maybe use the old door frame, and slap some insulation on the inside. If I get the framing/bracing right, it shouldn't be too flimsy.

    Outside skin or sheeting will be coroplast corragated sheets, stapled and glued to the frame. (note: the coroplast has to be wiped with a solvent, acetone or like, to remove the oily sheen, or the glue won't adhere). If I get the coroplast fastened correctly, it should add stiffness to the frame. For those that don't know coroplast - that's the material that those realtor and campaign signs are made of - expensive to buy, but cheap by midnight raids - will be plenty available in 2012. Actually, I have a big stack of this stuff, odd pieces from cut sheets used as target backers at a local shooting range.

    I looked at styrofoam-type material for insulation, would be good as it adds stiffness to the big box, but that stuff is expensive. Half or one inch thick is low on insulating value, and 2-inch is OK, but expensive for a big box. Decided on 4-inch fiberglass batt insulation (maybe 6-inch), with a water-resistant or plastic liner. Has a much higher insulating R-value, easy to staple in place, can tape or glue edges to keep glass fiber from contaminating the tobacco.

    I'll use the crockpot and temp/RH gages from the old kiln.
    Does this sound like a plan? I might be a bit flimsy and awkward, but I don't plan on moving it around too much, and if it gets weak at the joints, there is always more gorilla-glue.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jitterbugdude View Post
    The problem with colloidal silver is that it would most likely kill ALL of the microbes, including the ones that are needed for fermentation.
    Thanks for the reality check!

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