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Northwood seeds

3 plants in one pot

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#1
yeah, so i stupidly ended up with a few plants in single pots, i've done 4 pots with 2 in each i seperated gingerely and i think will be ok into the ground but i have 2 pots like this... suggestions, do i simply sacrifice 1 or 2 ? or try and separate ? or just wing it and see what happens ? i have plenty of plants and seedlings on the go
 

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Smokin Harley

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#2
I would figure out which one to keep and cut stalks on the other two. Too much plant in one space, may stunt them all if you don't thin it out.
 
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#3
You could risk trying to save more than one, but my experience is that unless you damage all of them in order to have three damaged plants, you end up with one good one and two that are probably 3 weeks behind the other. (if that makes sense)
 

buck

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#6
What happens if you plant them in the ground like that and provide enough fert for them to grow, they should grow normally should they not. Mind you it will make it difficult for removing suckers and bugs as well as priming.
 
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#7
What happens if you plant them in the ground like that and provide enough fert for them to grow, they should grow normally should they not. Mind you it will make it difficult for removing suckers and bugs as well as priming.
I'm sorry. That is unlikely. You may get just as much leaf weight per square foot of garden, perhaps a bit more, but definitely not per plant. And you would be stringing many more small leaves to get that.

What you suggest -increasing nutrient density to essentially, three times normal- sounds logical ; however, there is still issue of root volume which will be way down. There is not a linear relationship. Three times the nutrients does not equal three times the uptake. The plant can and will only take up as much as it can, or needs at the time.

And what have you done to the salinity, osmotic pressure, and the microbiological environment of the soil by increasing the nutrients so dramatically?

Also, there is a direct relationship between root size and plant size. This isn't just because bigger roots can bring in more nutrients. It is also because much of a plants metabolism of carbohydrates occurs in the roots.

I still go with Smokin Harley's advice. Snip the biggest ones at the base.
 

wrapper

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#8
Cut the two weakest at ground level. If they were a bit smaller you could risk treating them like transplants and separate them, re-pot or plant out. They are quite tough plants. As you have plenty of other plants on the go maybe experiment a bit.
 

Smokin Harley

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#9
I'm sorry. That is unlikely. You may get just as much leaf weight per square foot of garden, perhaps a bit more, but definitely not per plant. And you would be stringing many more small leaves to get that.

What you suggest -increasing nutrient density to essentially, three times normal- sounds logical ; however, there is still issue of root volume which will be way down. There is not a linear relationship. Three times the nutrients does not equal three times the uptake. The plant can and will only take up as much as it can, or needs at the time.

And what have you done to the salinity, osmotic pressure, and the microbiological environment of the soil by increasing the nutrients so dramatically?

Also, there is a direct relationship between root size and plant size. This isn't just because bigger roots can bring in more nutrients. It is also because much of a plants metabolism of carbohydrates occurs in the roots.

I still go with Smokin Harley's advice. Snip the biggest ones at the base.
Thanks , but I would snip the smallest ones and save the biggest one .
 

deluxestogie

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#10
As tobacco plants grow, their roots seem to stake out their territory. By that, I mean that more mature roots appear to suppress root growth into their space by neighbors. Even among well spaced plants, if a replacement transplant is placed into an "empty" space created by the demise of a single plant, but it is significantly smaller than its better established neighbors, the new transplant is invariably stunted.

And the pot you are using seems awfully small, even for a single plant.

Bob
 
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#11
thanks everyone, i'm going to bite the bullet and snip the other 2 - i have plenty on the go

btw, the variety is a native to the region i'm in, in spain
 
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#13
the problem is we're not sure of the licensing/permission etc for growing your own where i am, trying to find out but if you know spain at all it's bureaucratic nightmare - okay, i've googled the local name for it and it doesn't show up - its called pota - we think it was banned from sale about 20 years ago but obviously locals have carried it on regardless
 
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#15
cool - any rough idea when will they flower ? bearing in mind its 1st july and the size they are now? (they grow to about 6ft)
 

Alpine

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#16
IF they are rusticas, i strongly doubt they will reach 6 ft tall. Rusticas usually take less than 50 days to mature (in full ground, no idea how long will they take in pots), anyway with the beautyful climate of Spain, you have plenty of time to see them flower, set seed pods, mature and cure (unless you are in the Picos in Asturias lol)
Pier
 

rustycase

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#17
I do agree with DS yet I would flood the pot and separate the threesome, placing each deeply into a muddy hole in the ground.
wouldn't hurt to remove the bottom leaves...
Best
rc
 

deluxestogie

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#19
Snip the biggest ones at the base.
I do that all the time. My finger is reaching for the "smallest" key, and instead strikes the "biggest."

I think everybody understood the transposition in the way you intended. Although, if there were three warts growing on my finger, and I could only snip two of them...

Bob
 
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