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  1. #531
    Administrator deluxestogie's Avatar
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    Re: deluxestogie Grow Log 2017

    Quote Originally Posted by OldDinosaurWesH View Post
    I have a rock that is similarly pink and black speckled. It's called Rhodonite.
    But does it use digital camo?



    Bob

  2. #532
    Senior Member OldDinosaurWesH's Avatar
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    Re: deluxestogie Grow Log 2017

    Bob:

    No. Clever beans. But I've seen a few gun stocks like that. Mostly being operated by females.

    How did you get to be so knowledgeable on Agronomy?

    Wes H.

  3. #533
    Administrator deluxestogie's Avatar
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    Re: deluxestogie Grow Log 2017

    Quote Originally Posted by OldDinosaurWesH View Post
    How did you get to be so knowledgeable on Agronomy?
    Very slowly. Lots of reading. Lots of growing. My undergraduate degree in Biology included zero...count them...zero botany courses.

    Bob

  4. #534
    Senior Member OldDinosaurWesH's Avatar
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    Re: deluxestogie Grow Log 2017

    Bob:

    I went to a Pac 10 school (ranked #3 in the nation in agriculture @ that time) and got a degree in Agriculture with a specialty in Agronomy and Pest Management. I did take Botany, a year of Biology, a year of Chemistry, Geology, as well as a whole host of agricultural related courses. Soils, Plant Pathology, Entomology, etc.

    We learned a lot about wheat and related field crops. This is part of the reason I ask questions about taxonomy, and minute details about blooms and the like. I was on the crop judging team in high school, and you have to look at very fine details in order to identify some of these plants. Especially some of those miserable grasses. It also helps if you know the basic botanical classifications. If you know what family it belongs to, specific identification gets a lot easier. (What kind of herbicide that will work also ties back into knowing the families.)

    As an example, I recently had a botanical conundrum. I spotted a tree that was very different than anything I'd ever seen before. Now that was a challenge! I could tell from its' leaves that it was a legume. It definitely wasn't a Locust, (Common around here) but has some similarities, looking more like the compound stems of the Acacia. I took some research on the internet, but I found it. Partly because the foliage looked a lot like an Acacia. It was Albizia julibrissin, the Mimosa, or Persian Silk Tree. The mimosa is a different branch of the legume family more closely related to the Acacia than the Locusts.

    About the only thing I knew about tobacco is that it is a solanacea, related to the potato, pepper, etc. So if you get tired of all my impertinent questions please bear with me.

    Locust-(4)1.gifacacia_pennatula_S_OF_CALOTMUL_01s.jpgMimosa tree w foliage - fruit.jpg

    Photo 1, Honey Locust w/ disgusting pods. I have a big one in my front yard. These are Dioecious Trees, and my dad planted the female downwind of the male. It's about 60 years old & produces a ton or so of these pods every year.

    Photo 2, Foliage of the Acacia

    Photo 3, foliage, bloom, and fruiting bodies (pods), of the Mimosa.

  5. #535
    Administrator deluxestogie's Avatar
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    Re: deluxestogie Grow Log 2017

    The Joys of a Meteor Watch

    An average of 82 meteors per hour. That's what they were predicting for tonight's Perseid Meteor Shower. I dowsed all my exposed skin with 40% DEET, lit up the remaining half of a cigar, then took up a trekking pole for assistance in balancing in the darkness.

    Of course, there was the predictable patchy clouds and low haze. And the waning gibbous moon would rise at 11:18 pm, blotting out everything. So I headed out at about 9:15.

    I slowly walked down my gravel driveway, searching for a spot that blocked the greatest number of insecurity lights mounted on neighbors' houses. It's amazing how bright those lights are when viewed from over 100 yards away. I fumed at mankind's rejection of night time. I circled through the front yard, and finally ended up in the lawn chair that sits at the top of my garden, with silhouettes of my remaining tobacco plants arrayed below me.

    There was a break in the clouds to the North. I positioned my FTT ball cap sideways, so that its bill blocked the bright light situated above the now-abandoned goat pen in the neighbor's yard to my left, leaned my head back, and stared vaguely into the hazy sky. A few stars twinkled. At one point, I could see all of Cassiopeia, but only briefly.

    Whenever I heard the sounds of automobile tires on the road, I closed my eyes, and held my forearm to my face. For millennia, humankind would cease its scurrying when night fell. How's a codger supposed to see any meteors if cars keep driving by--one every 5 or 10 minutes?

    I focused again at the sky. Flash! Flash! Fireflies were out and about, repeatedly snatching my attention. Then came the bats. Two of them buzzed me again and again. Fluttering, dark shadows that swooped and lofted, totally silent. More fireflies. I began to laugh out loud. It wasn't just decadent humanity that conspired to impede my astronomical observations. It was Mother Nature as well. More cars, more fireflies, more bats. I laughed some more.

    The carbon dioxide from my breath attracted mosquitoes, but when they came up close to my strategically applied DEET, they must have become confused. Hence the swooping bats.

    I puffed my half-cigar. The red glow was now noticeably bright. And when I looked up, I saw that the wafting cigar smoke would briefly obscure a star or two. Drat. And now, clouds were moving in.

    For inexplicable reasons, I found all this to be delightfully funny. When my invisible cigar began to burn my fingers, I tossed it into the wet grass, and gave up. No meteor shower. Not even one meteor. But I enjoyed just sitting out there in the darkness, assaulted by distractions from man and beast and bug (and cigar).

    I went inside to roll another cigar. I felt more open to whatever came to hand. Just sitting still in the darkness, surrounded by nature, has a way of softening ones demands. I found a single, tattered and neglected WLT PA Oscuro leaf--the last leaf in a buried bag. That would be my wrapper. Below it, in the box of long ignored bags of less than ideal leaf, I came across Metacomet. (It's a wrapper variety, but we're not being picky tonight.) Perfect for a post-meteor filler. I selected some ratty Bolivia Criollo Black for flavor and strength. Binder be damned. I didn't even clean all the dried dirt from some of the filler leaves.



    It turned out to be one of those delicious, but random cigars that will never happen again--like seeing a particular meteor.

    Bob

  6. #536
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    Re: deluxestogie Grow Log 2017

    What a lovely night !
    I think that life is easier when you have a good smoke It helps seeing things with a more compliant mind.
    Thanks for your beautifull story, which brought smile to me too.

    P.S. beautifull pictures of hummingbirds and flowers !

  7. #537
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    Re: deluxestogie Grow Log 2017

    We sit on our front porch every night and sometimes time goes by quickly and it gets late . We were watching for the meteor shower that night and did not see any . The moon was bright and we had no clouds at all .
    We can see the sky really good as I have lots of big trees in my yard to cut out all those lights even the cars lights are blocked out to where you can barely see them . Just a big wide hole that you can see up to the stars .
    Neighbors have asked why I don't cut my trees to where we can see the road and people can see my house . We just tell them that we like people not being able to see my house and I can't see all those lights .

    But in the winter time those lights shine through the leafless trees . One neighbor a quarter mile down the road has a light on the side of his house that shine toward my house . I swear it is a high powered spot light of some kind and is very annoying . At times I would like to knock it out .

    Bats swoop down by us at times but they mean no harm .

  8. #538
    Administrator deluxestogie's Avatar
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    Re: deluxestogie Grow Log 2017

    Quote Originally Posted by Charly View Post
    I think that life is easier when you have a good smoke.
    Quote Originally Posted by BigBonner View Post
    We sit on our front porch every night.... Just a big wide hole that you can see up to the stars.
    People speak of "urban blight" as the occurrence of abandoned homes and businesses within the core of an otherwise "healthy" city. By contrast, I consider urban blight as more of a mentality. I'll call it "urban mentality blight." Urban blight, for short.

    The root of the matter is that "civilized" comes from the Latin, civitas, which simply means "city." We think that being civilized means that we must live and think in the context of a city. While it's not surprising that suburbs carry on the practices of their adjacent cities, such as street lights and night-long illumination of the exterior of a home, I'm more puzzled by adoption of needless "city" characteristics in otherwise tranquil and beautiful rural areas. Are relatively isolated farm homes really "safer" with lights blazing all night long? Who sold us on this notion?

    Quote Originally Posted by NYC Data Science Academy
    ...an increase in crime rates appears with an increase in population density, but only up to 500 ppl/sq.mi...

    http://blog.nycdatascience.com/stude...ncrease-crime/
    In areas below a population density of 500 people per square mile(!), the more isolated you are, the lower the crime rate.

    In 1973, I took a nighttime commercial flight from St. Louis to San Francisco. Across 2000 miles of our continent, only cities and towns stood out in the night. Everywhere else was asleep and invisible from 33,000 feet. Even California was mostly dark, until we approached the "string of pearls" illumination of the San Francisco Bay area, and its long, brightly lit bridges that stretched over the black waters of the bay. The rural people of America were just as civilized then as today, but accepted the natural order of night and day.

    By the time I flew from Roanoke to Oakland one night in 1999 (25 years later), it was a different picture. You could actually delineate the boundaries of planted fields in the heartland. They were the non-lighted areas. Nearly every humble habitation from Virginia to California maintained nighttime lighting. Bright lighting. Urban blight.


    Take note of Puerto Rico.

    Now, we are truly civilized.

    Bob

  9. #539
    Senior Member OldDinosaurWesH's Avatar
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    Re: deluxestogie Grow Log 2017

    Bob:

    An Agronomist and a philosopher! I though I was the Old Dinosaur!

    Keep up the good work.

    Wes H.
    amaryllis 2017 (2).jpg

    My indoor hobby, I have regenerated this Amaryllis bulb every year since I bought it in...2002. I had to kill a few of these before I figured out how to regenerate them. I don't know how long these live, but it is on my front porch for its annual regrow and is looking good. Hopefully more beautiful blooms next spring.

  10. #540
    Administrator deluxestogie's Avatar
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    Re: deluxestogie Grow Log 2017

    Quote Originally Posted by OldDinosaurWesH View Post
    My indoor hobby, I have regenerated this Amaryllis bulb every year since I bought it in...2002.
    Very nice.

    I've perpetuated some potted tobacco plants for up to 3 seasons, then watched them explode into full-size beasts when belatedly placed into the ground, for their last hurrah.

    My only other humble success has been a potted chrysanthemum that I've sheltered indoors every winter for the past few years, then returned to my front steps each spring. Some years it's bloomy, other years mostly leafage.

    Bob

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