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  1. #11
    Senior Member riverstone's Avatar
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    Re: Flue-Curing Versus Air Cured

    You can flue cure Maryland and I have a very grainy article on the subject. I flue cured the last of my crop last year and it was as good as the air cured. I did mention it but got no replies or interest. Hope you have good eyes. It basically says that if you follow the same temperatures and times as Virginias you are OK.
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    When you are dead, you do not know that you are dead. All the pain is felt by others.
    The same thing happens when you are stupid!

  2. #12
    Senior Member Orson Carte's Avatar
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    Re: Flue-Curing Versus Air Cured

    I really wish I could actually read this.
    To my tired old eyes it could well be the Rosetta Stone, and I wouldn't know the difference.
    Time flies like an arrow. Horse flies like a ripe tobacco leaf.

  3. #13
    Administrator deluxestogie's Avatar
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    Re: Flue-Curing Versus Air Cured

    When I enlarge the images of the article, and struggle my way through it, it does not appear to be discussing flue-curing the Maryland.

    My understanding of it:
    • Maryland was whole-stalk harvested, and speared onto traditional tobacco sticks.
    • The harvested plants were hung closely packed within a sealed structure.
    • Air was mechanically circulated, and humidity maintained high during yellowing.
    • Temp was raised to 80-90°F after yellowing, allowing the leaf to rapidly dry.

    I would consider this simply barn-curing with optimized conditions. The forced air allowed closer than traditional packing within the barn, while 80-90°F is an ideal temperature for both yellowing and drying.

    I can't say that Maryland can or can not be flue-cured, since I have not tried it. But your own experience flue-curing Maryland does increase my likelihood of giving that a try, the next time I grow a Maryland variety

    Bob

    EDIT: One of the apparent goals of this 1983 study was to come up with a process that could be handled from field to finished product using automated machinery.

  4. #14
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    Re: Flue-Curing Versus Air Cured

    My young eyes can't make this out, maybe I need an optometrist, I must be doing something wrong, Air curing seems easier to me, I just hung out my rustica after a week pile curing, in a dirt floor shed with no door on the back lawn and its all looking nearly ready about 5 weeks later.

  5. #15
    Administrator deluxestogie's Avatar
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    Re: Flue-Curing Versus Air Cured

    This is slightly easier to read, I think.




    Bob

  6. #16
    Senior Member Orson Carte's Avatar
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    Re: Flue-Curing Versus Air Cured

    Because I still haven't got my head fully around the fundamental difference (as far as it affects the chemical changes in the leaf) between air-drying and flue-curing I am compelled to ask the question;

    If a burley, or Maryland leaf has gone through the full run of air-curing and the stem has still not fully dried-off, would it sabotage the whole process if the leaf was 'finished' in a flue-chamber, at 165F (for a period long enough to dry the stem)?
    I ran into trouble last year when the weather became damp before the stems had properly dried and the only way I could think of to get around the problem was to remove the stems before fermentation.
    Time flies like an arrow. Horse flies like a ripe tobacco leaf.

  7. #17
    Administrator deluxestogie's Avatar
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    Re: Flue-Curing Versus Air Cured

    Given your scenario, I would suggest drying the cured burley and Maryland stems at a temperature below 130°F. That should not require much time. In my experience, opening a moist kiln that is at ~125°F, and removing the heated leaf to ambient temperature (~70°F) and air results in both the lamina and leaves rapidly drying, simply because the leaf is much warmer than the air. When I want to bag such leaf with some retained moisture, I have to work fast to prevent it from drying too much.

    Bob

    EDIT: Another possibility is to stack the cured leaf on a seedling heat mat for a few days, turning it a few times. I've done this a number of times (Knucklehead's suggestion), and been happy with how well it dries stubborn stems.

  8. #18
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    Re: Flue-Curing Versus Air Cured

    Deleted. Someone else more knowledgable beat me to it.

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