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  1. #871
    Senior Member OldDinosaurWesH's Avatar
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    Dayton Wa.
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    Re: let's see your veggie garden {pics}

    A common weed we have around here is brasica nigra, the black mustard. I'm guessing that is probably what you have. Black mustard seeds are smaller than most cultivated mustards. If you can manage to capture the seeds, they are edible. The plants are pretty efficient at scattering their seed all over the place, making the harvesting time a critically narrow window. Black mustard is a cultivated plant that has escaped and dispersed itself all over. Black mustard and white mustard have significant botanical and culinary differences. Most of the mustards grown for food are in the white mustard group.

    There a few people around here that have occasionally grown mustard, mostly for the oil seed industry (canola, which is in the rapeseed group), and of course for a crop rotation. The fields are very beautiful in the spring blooming season, and can bee seen from many miles away. Of course around here you can drive ten miles or less and gain enough elevation to see Steptoe Butte from here. That's nearly 100 miles away. For the aircraft stationed at Fairchild AFB outside Spokane Wa. Steptoe butte is a major navigational beacon, formerly for the B-52's, now the air-tanker squadrons. We call those giant aircraft an "aluminum overcast" especially when they practicing radar avoidance by flying low. The navy also uses Steptoe as a navigational beacon when they fly out of Whidbey Island NAS. I used to see EA6-B's flying low on a regular basis. They like to "hide" in the Snake river canyon which in places is 2,000 feet deep.

    Wes H.
    Last edited by OldDinosaurWesH; 10-09-2017 at 09:52 PM. Reason: Additional info

  2. #872
    Administrator deluxestogie's Avatar
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    Re: let's see your veggie garden {pics}

    My wild mustard is more likely B. juncea, since it grows only to a height of about 3', and tenaciously keeps its seed within the long, dried pods.

    Bob

  3. #873
    Senior Member OldDinosaurWesH's Avatar
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    Re: let's see your veggie garden {pics}

    Good luck and have fun!

    Wes H.

  4. #874
    Senior Member ChinaVoodoo's Avatar
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    Edmonton, AB, CA
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    Re: let's see your veggie garden {pics}

    This is really cool. My tomato stalks filled up with frost and exploded.
    IMG_20171012_111417017_HDR~2.jpg
    This blanket is a necessity. It keeps me from cracking up. It may be regarded as a spiritual tourniquet. Without it, I'd be nothing, a ship without a rudder. - Linus

  5. #875
    Senior Member OldDinosaurWesH's Avatar
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    Re: let's see your veggie garden {pics}

    Wow! That must have been some very cold temps. Up on the north slope in Alaska, when it gets cold enough (-50 or less) the trees literally explode like they had a small explosive in them.

    Wes H.

  6. #876
    Administrator deluxestogie's Avatar
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    Re: let's see your veggie garden {pics}

    Pepper Clean-up


    4 pounds of mixed peppers.

    It looks like I'll get a frost late tonight. It's that time of year that I need to consider bringing my pot of fall Mums indoors at night. But I still have 4 varieties of peppers laden with fruit, and still creating more.

    I picked every pepper that looked developed enough to be worth eating: Sweet Red Cherry, Sweet Banana, Golden California Wonder, and Quadratto d'Asti.

    The green cherry peppers will turn red on the window sill. The banana peppers just get dumped into a crisper drawer in the fridge. This season, of the Golden Cal Wonder bell peppers, I've gotten exactly one to actually mature to yellow. (That gives new meaning to the term, "wonder".)

    Quadratto d'Asti is an Italian square bell that is supposed to produce a nearly burgundy red, richly flavored flesh. For some reason, all the blossoms on both of these heirloom plants dropped off shortly after forming. This happened all summer long. A few weeks ago, both plants began to form fruit. As they were plucked, still green, from their stems today, the largest was a little under 3", and still deep green. I can leave them on the window sill, so long as they don't dehydrate too much. Maybe I'll get a red one.

    The sad part of this tale is the several dozen huge blackberries that are still immature. They will either freeze or not.

    So, my food gardening season for 2017 is history.

    Bob

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