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Whole Leaf Tobacco

Any suggestions?

deluxestogie

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#2
That's a challenge, since Cuban cigar tobacco is never smooth and creamy. I would go with the following suggestions.

  • Honduras Habano Filler
  • Corojo 99 Seco (OR Criollo 98 Seco)
Bob
 

Charly

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#6
That's a challenge, since Cuban cigar tobacco is never smooth and creamy
I am surprised by what you say... I had some really smooth and creamy cuban cigars in past years ! Those were often «old cigar references» since a lot of them are no longer available...
Nowadays cuban cigars seem more strong and «dry» (from.my little experience...)

I remember some great Partagas «serie du connaisseur» or fine La Gloria Cubana... creamy and aromatic !
 

deluxestogie

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#7
Back in the 1970s, when Davidoff (of Geneva) manufactured all of its cigars in Cuba--and while Zino Davidoff was still living, the Davidoff cigars seemed to be the smoothest Cuban cigars on the market, with Montecristo #1 coming in second. Having said that, I never felt that either of them was "smooth and creamy." My assessment of every single Cuban cigar that I've ever smoked (which numbers into many boxes) is that each one would have been better, if it had not been quite as potent. Maybe that is just me.

Bob
 
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#8
Back in the 1970s, when Davidoff (of Geneva) manufactured all of its cigars in Cuba--and while Zino Davidoff was still living, the Davidoff cigars seemed to be the smoothest Cuban cigars on the market, with Montecristo #1 coming in second. Having said that, I never felt that either of them was "smooth and creamy." My assessment of every single Cuban cigar that I've ever smoked (which numbers into many boxes) is that each one would have been better, if it had not been quite as potent. Maybe that is just me.

Bob

Bob,
I find this statement very interesting as I find that Non-Cuban cigars on average tend to be much stronger than Cuban cigars. I've never had my head spinning after a Cuban but have had that many times after a non-cuban smoke.
Pete
 

deluxestogie

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#9
I have no doubt that commercial non-Cuban cigars have, since the late 1990s, been blended with stronger and stronger leaf combinations. They, and the Cuban cigars have also become progressively fatter. I'll take a wild guess and say that with the skyrocketed cost per cigar (mostly due to taxes), the average cigar smoker smokes fewer cigars. So cigars that I would consider outrageously strong have become the norm.

In Zino Davidoff's 1969 book, The Connoisseur's Book of the Cigar, he list the most common cigar sizes being produced in Cuba at that time:
  • Small Corona
  • Demi-tasse
  • Small Panetela
  • Panatela
  • Demi-Corona
  • Little Corona
  • Corona
  • Lonsdale
  • Double Corona
There were, of course, other shapes and sizes being made, but this list accounts for the vast majority of the Cuban cigars sold at that time. Another significant difference from today is the wrapper. Claro, which is a light, golden brown, has now faded from the lexicon, and is often incorrectly considered a term for the double-claro, or candela (green) wrapper.

Of the non-Cuban cigars, Hoyo de Monterrey used to make a Spanish Claro demi-tasse, sold in a box of 50. It's gone. Hoyo Excalibur used to offer a size VI, which was a petite corona. It's gone. In fact, the lighter-wrapped, original Excalibur cigars are vanishing from the market. Petite coronas in general are going off the market. So, the market says, "give me bigger and darker."

I will easily concede that preferences in taste and aroma (and for that matter, size) are an individual thing. Nicotine content and its relative physiologic impact is not. While some folks are certainly more sensitive to the effects of nicotine, each cigar smoker is able to judge the relative nicotine load of one cigar vs another. As a smoker of 5-ish cigars a day, I have found that every Cuban cigar in recent memory has slammed me.

Like a discussion of religion, a debate about something as treasured as Cuban cigars is not likely to persuade anyone of a differing opinion. But this is my experience with them.

My suggestion for the WLT customer who longed for a smooth and creamy Cuban-like filler would offer a medium to full bodied filler that is not too harsh or too potent. Maybe that would be a disappointment.

Bob
 
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#10
I would agree that smooth and creamy cigars are not the norm at this time. I have only been into cigars for the last six years or so and am not a fan of the big/fat cigars. I prefer the lonsdale and robusto sizes followed by the pyramid (6 1/2 x 52). I now make a point of looking for lighter smokes. I find myself gravitating towards the Fuente lines with a Cameroon wrapper (Hemingway and Don Carlos). My favorite CC is the Fonseca #1, definitely one of the milder CC out there.

I need to get more leaf from Don and get to rolling again but time is just so hard to come by right now.

I have traded most of my CC due to quality issues. I shouldn't have to dry box a cigar for 1 or 2 weeks for it to smoke good. I keep my humidor at 65% RH and below 70 degrees so everything should be smokable right out of the Humi. The cigars I rolled with leaf from Don smoke just fine without being dry boxed at all.

Pete
 

Youn

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#11
I'm not an expert but since my short experience, I second what Bob adviced, with a slight difference : I would put the criollo in first choise and the corojo as alternative, because the first one appear to me a little softer than the second one.
I agree totally with the choise of Honduras Habano to go with. This leaf have something magic that soften the others without loosing their caracter… it seems it even highlights the qualities and removes the rough aspects of what you blend with (I've already tried it blended with criollo, corojo, nicaragua habano and piloto cubano ; each time I had this same impression).
 

rainmax

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#12
I had some really smooth and creamy cuban cigars in past years ! Those were often «old cigar references» since a lot of them are no longer available...
I remember some great Partagas «serie du connaisseur» or fine La Gloria Cubana... creamy and aromatic !
I can totally agree with you on Partagas.
Last box I ordered back in last century. 1999 I believe. wooden box no3. without bands. Also one of my favorite cigars.

  • Honduras Habano Filler
  • Corojo 99 Seco (OR Criollo 98 Seco)
Bob
...and I also believe that this is a right choice.
With aging will become softer and maybe creamy.
 

mwaller

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#14
I'm interested in trying a few of WLT's cigar tobaccos, but I'm somewhat overwhelmed by the number of choices! I like my cigars to be strong and rich, but without excessive bite. I've never found a commercial cigar that was 'too strong' for me, but I don't appreciate a cigars that burn my tongue with spice. In the current Habanos lineup, I tend to prefer Bolivar. In non-cubans, I generally enjoy maduros.
Can you recommend a few fillers, and a wrapper or two?
Do I need to purchase binder leaves, or will the filler work for that?
And do I actually need seco leaves to make the cigar burn, or can I just roll with viso and ligero?
Thanks!



That's a challenge, since Cuban cigar tobacco is never smooth and creamy. I would go with the following suggestions.

  • Honduras Habano Filler
  • Corojo 99 Seco (OR Criollo 98 Seco)
Bob
 

ras_oscar

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#15
A year ago I purchased a box of Camacho Triple Maduro cigars. They were harsh and irritated the back of my throat. A year later they have mellowed into one of my favorites. I wish I had purchased an additional box. I suspect the CCs you are smoking have aged for a long while. I suspect those "creamy" CCs would taste a lot different if they were younger.
 
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