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Whole Leaf Tobacco

Ciennepi 2018 Grow Blog

ciennepi

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The leafs in low case put in a big (30x80 cm) poly-nylon bag closed with clothespin.
I will open every week to monitor the leafs and exclude the grow of mold. Ready to kiln in a feew month.
20181007_071240~2.jpg
 

ciennepi

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OT Post. Excuse me if I pollute the tobacco post with other topic.
Saturday was sauerkraut day.
This are about 130 kg (286 lb) of clean cabbage grow in our garden ready to be shredded.
20181012_104004.jpg
And this is the plastic barrel and the shredder (Austria made Silvretta) used for the job and the fermentation. As learned from the "old" people (my father and my father in law ;) ) I add 130 gr of natural salt for every 100 kg of cabbage.
20181012_104023.jpg
And this is the wife that try to compact the cabbage to eliminate every air poket.:love: The problem is that the cabbage weigh more than two time the wife! :D
20181012_113726.jpg
 

ciennepi

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The kraut take about 50-60 days to complete the fermentation. At about half of december the temperature in our cellar has dropped enough to constitute a natural fridge and stop further fermentation. We leave the kraut in the fermentation barrel (made of alimentary plastic suitable for contact with acid food) and withdraw the needed quantity. The important thing is to keep the kraut ALWAYS covered with they water of fermentation.
 

ciennepi

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If we don't eat all the kraut at the end of march when the temperature begin to raise we deep freeze the remaining in little freezer bags. Keep in mind that we live at 1000 m s.l.m (3280 ft above sea level).
 

deluxestogie

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Although I have not tried this, I have read that a tight seal can be made above the kraut by partially filling a food-safe plastic bag with water, then resting it atop the kraut.

Bob
 

Charly

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Thank you Charly. In winter kraut, polenta (I don't find a traduction word, It's a
cooked dough of corn flour) and pork meat It's a typical meal.
I know polenta :)
But I have never heard of polenta and sauerkraut together.
From where I come (Alsace region in France), we have "la choucroute" : sauerkraut, potatoes and a lot of different meat (some of which are smoked) :)
 

deluxestogie

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In the US, "polenta" is the term the upper middle class prefers to use for corn meal mush.

I had choucroute once in (I think) Lyon, decades ago. I've made it myself many times since. Now that I cook for just me, the variety of meat becomes more limited.

Around Philadelphia, a traditional breakfast (derived from German immigrants) is fried corn meal mush served with sliced, fried scrapple, which is a loaf composed of random pig parts.

Bob
 

ciennepi

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I have made one of the least harvest of this year due to the imminent freezing temperature. The leafs are Nostrano del Brenta ligero. Half of them will be pile cured as usually and half, as experiment, are hanged in my greenhouse where temperature and humidity are still very high.
I will see and compare the results.
20181019_142802.jpg
 

CobGuy

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Nice looking greenhouse! :)

As for Polenta ... it's pretty popular in the Southwest US and generally grilled or fried. I Like it!

~Darin
 

ciennepi

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I have finish all the curing of this year.
Now I will begin the kiln off all the leafs probably in three rounds.
My kiln hold perfectly well the temperature due to its isolation ( double panel of XPS 5+4 cm) but it is small in volume and the leafs hung up in hands take up too much space. So I will try to kiln the leafs in high case in closed poly bags to keep the humidity up. Every week I will bring out the bag and open briefly to outgass it and let come in new oxygen.
Yesterday I prepared the poly bag for the kiln. To close it I cut in piece those plastic back that hold togheter the paper sheets. I find it more practical than the clothespin.
20181125_101824.jpg
Before I mist slightly the leafs with plain water to bring in high case.
This are some example of different leafs.
This is Vuelta Abajo volado.
20181130_100714.jpg
This is Vuelta Abajo ligero. Notice the more intense colour.
20181130_101031.jpg
And this is Nostrano del Brenta ligero. Notice the almost black colour ;)
20181130_100145.jpg
 
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