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Whole Leaf Tobacco

Dark Virginian

mwaller

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 11, 2016
Messages
616
Likes
30
Points
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Location
Kirkland, WA
#21
Did you ever try out one of these Dark Virginian types? Which did/would you choose, and why?

I'm sure there's folks who can share their experience with dark Virginian type tobaccos. I have none. I am already planning next year (I know I'm not the only one). Next year will be nothing but air cured varieties. I was thinking of Goose Creek Red as one of them because I like the name, how it can be pin pointed down to originating from a specific place, the look of the plant, and how skychaser describes it not only as a pipe tobacco, but also usable as a cigar wrapper.

Has anyone compared the three varieties from Northwood - Goose Creek, Shirey, and Stag Horn?
 

burge

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2014
Messages
701
Likes
31
Points
28
Location
Alberta
#23
I just found this thread and got some baccy from Larry and I would call his orangey a dark Virginia tobacco. I am not sure what seed he uses. When shredded to me its a natural red.
 

Alpine

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 16, 2015
Messages
519
Likes
72
Points
28
Location
Eastern alps, near Trento, Italy
#25
Based on my tasting experience, GCR tastes nothing like a burley. I may have already said this, but to me it tastes like a “double” Virginia: more intense flavour, higher in nicotine (well, my grow at least). Plant form, signs of ripeness and smell while kilning completely different from the burleys I’ve grown. But I’m no genetist for sure. Just my 0.02 $

pier
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
12,549
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1,390
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
#26
That study looks at an isolated, specific genetic similarity. It would be like categorizing vegetables by their color alone, or a person's ethnicity by the shape of the toenail on the 3rd toe. A telling comment is their "surprise" that Xanthi, Basma and Izmir don't seem to be related. Doh!

Research published by CORESTA is usually of high quality. I believe this study is properly done, and interesting. But the authors' invalid deductions from the results fall outside the bounds of what the data they reported can support.

So, Goose Creek Red has a toenail shape on its 3rd toe that is similar to that of the burley they evaluated.

Bob
 

CobGuy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Messages
506
Likes
103
Points
43
Location
Central Arizona
#27
Based on my tasting experience, GCR tastes nothing like a burley. I may have already said this, but to me it tastes like a “double” Virginia: more intense flavour, higher in nicotine (well, my grow at least). Plant form, signs of ripeness and smell while kilning completely different from the burleys I’ve grown. But I’m no genetist for sure. Just my 0.02 $

pier
Sounds like one I'd enjoy in my pipe ... thanks! :)

-Darin
 
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