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Deluxestogie Grow Log 2018

deluxestogie

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#1
My current garden plan for 2018.



I have to rest several beds, due to virus issues, so the total tobacco plant count is only 128, in 8 varieties. However, unlike most other years, there are no closely-spaced Orientals to pad the numbers. [for example, a single 5'x5' bed can easily hold 44 small Orientals] These will all be full-size plants.

In the spot where my late raspberry bramble faded to nothing, I may dig a fresh bed. Or maybe not.

I was tempted to plant mostly Corojo 99, since it is fabulous. But monocultures are always a recipe for disaster. Piloto Cubano is not on the list, since I really don't have adequate tasting results from the 2017 crop yet.

My two experimentals for this season will be Rabo de Gallo Negro, and Sweet Orinoco, both from Don.

Ideally, all the beds would get a 3 year rest before the next tobacco crop, but that's not going to happen.

There is also the specter of Xylella fastidiosa, a bacterial plant pathogen that is transmitted by insects. It is capable of affecting 379 (and climbing) different plant genera, including all the solanaceae. It is currently at epidemic levels, and has completely wiped out various fruit orchards and olive groves in the Mediterranean. All of Europe and the UK are on high alert for the pathogen. It doesn't seem to be on the tobacco radar yet, here in the US, though the American grape industry is quite concerned. It's been known as "Pierce's disease" on grape vines for over 100 years. We'll see where this goes.

[It's just what we need--another pathogen that affects tobacco.]

Bob
 

Leftynick

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#2
Nice layout. Thrilled to see you already planned for new season. Looks like I am not the only one watching out for virus in the garden.
 

Thedbs999

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#4
Looking great Bob.

Iam down sizing to 3 varieties this year.Amazing how time is flying by. Heck Iam still kilning last years crop.

Dan
 

rainmax

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#6
I will follow this blog. You are always first with your plan.
Last year I was sure that this year I will take a break..but I'm not so sure anymore.
Some wrapper and some Corojo 99. Criollo Colorado maybe...
 

deluxestogie

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#8
Bob - What has been your experience with Olor? How productive is it, and how is the flavor?
Most of my Olor crops were sturdy and productive, some with very large leaves. How is the flavor? In general, excellent. More than with most cigar varieties, the distinctive flavor ramps its intensity from the stalk base to the top leaf. All of it is full-bodied. The tips are potent condiments. The lower 2/3 of the plant makes wrappers/binders.

It is distinguishable at a distance from the named Havana varieties, as well as from Criollo and Corojo. My preferred Olor variety, and the one that I grow, was labeled by GRIN as "WRAPPER DOM REP". The other three varieties of Olor that I have grown were from Puerto Rico. Although they appeared nearly identical in side-by-side grows with the Dominican Olor, the Dominican was more productive, with slightly larger leaf.

Bob
 

Hasse SWE

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#9
Very interesting grow Bob, you are really great on this. I will for sure follow this. Even I will grow Corojo 99 this season because it sounds like a really good variant. I really like that you tell about problems and tell what should be done to minimize the risk (and problem) but the same time say "but that's not going to happen". Because that is close to always true for us hobby grower. I have my favorite grow please in my garden. I try to switch the Solid (but that ain't always help) Even if I cleaning everything I use in my garden.
 

deluxestogie

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#11
I thought Dominican Olor had relatively long, narrow leaves... is yours different?
Here is a leaf photo for my Olor:



My data sheet for that grow indicates that the average measurements for the 10th leaf was 25" x 9.5", with an average leaf count of 22. Plant height 54 - 60"



The variety shown in both of these photos is specifically PI 552617. This appears to be the same variety offered by skychaser at Northwoodseeds.com (as Dominican Republic Olor: filler).

Bob

EDIT: Skychaser's photo:


You can check out the ARS-GRIN photos here: https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/accessiondetail.aspx?id=1447589
 
Last edited:

Charly

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#12
Once again, I will read your grow blog with great pleasure :)
Thanks for pointing out the source for Dominican Olor, I will definitly order some seeds from Skychaser this year again.

Good luck with your crop.
 

rainmax

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#14
Wow, cold. We have 10+ (50 F) this days, but Celsius. I can not remember when it was last time so hot in the peak of the winter.
Not in my town.
But don't worry, Bob. This is just good for this tobacco season. Pray it will hold for at least 10 days. No horn worm and other pests...
Put double socks and long under ware, fur hat like I have on my avatar picture. Drink jagertee and smoke Panatelas.
Is there any snow already or it is just frizzy windy?
 

deluxestogie

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#15
No snow out there.

I'm wearing everything you describe, just to sit indoors. The insulation of my old farmhouse is...old. I've cut off the bottom end of an old sleeping bag as a cozy for my feet. And I regularly fill a 1 quart bottle with hot water, and keep it beside my feet. My coffee is hot, and so is my pipe bowl.

I'm willing to open peace talks with the hornworms, if this cold will end.

Bob
 

Thedbs999

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#18
Bob

I understand I wear a hoody constantly with the hood up. It was minus 6 here this morning. Thank God my son bought me a electric blanket for Christmas a couple years ago. My schnauzer enjoys it as much as me.

Dan
 

OldDinosaurWesH

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#19
All our Christmas snow melted by New Years and we have resumed our normal winter pattern of below freezing at night and above freezing in the day. Most of the snow melt went down the creek. We had high water but no flooding. Thankfully, I live in a fairly modern house (1950's) with reasonable (and updated in the 70's) insulation. I can heat the place modestly and not have to go into debt to do it.

Bob: I've seen the map on the weather channel and it looks like that cold blob is hitting your area pretty good. Stay warm, and best wishes for the new year. Spring will get here, it just may take a while.

Wes H.
 
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