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Whole Leaf Tobacco

Deluxestogie Grow Log 2018

Joined
Sep 1, 2014
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Location
Edmonton, AB, CA
With all their nooks and crannies, morel mushrooms can hide tiny insects. I toss the mushrooms into a dish of water, to encourage the insects to abandon ship. Since the stipe is hollow, I always slice the mushrooms in half to rinse them. Then...saute in butter.

Bob
That's another good reason, but Charly is referring to their monomethylhydrazine content which goes away when dried, sauteed, or fried.
 
Joined
May 25, 2011
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Location
near Blacksburg, VA
My Share of Hurricane Michael



The remnants of this hurricane did not come here, but the rain was heavier than from the one that did.





It's at the severity level of messy and inconvenient, but nothing more. We'll have some additional wind tonight, but hopefully that won't be too much for my big maple trees.

I've been following the damage to the Florida panhandle fairly closely. I used to live in Panama City, while I was stationed at Tyndall AFB. I lived in Ft. Walton Beach while stationed at Eglin AFB. Eglin and Ft. Walton Beach weren't too severely hit, but both Panama City and Tyndall sustained extensive damage.

Aerial footage of Panama City and Mexico Beach (the point of landfall, just to the east of Tyndall) show many damaged houses. More dramatic are the scenes where about 80% of the houses are nothing but a concrete pad--not even any strewn rubble. Just swept away entirely.

Bob
 
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
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Location
Dayton Wa.
Ramaria is very much edible except that it is somewhat bland. We have two species here. The main bloom is in the spring. (Ramaria rasilispora & Ramaria botrytis) I'm still looking for Bear's Head (Hericium abietis), I know we have them, I have yet to find one though. Such is the luck of the draw on collecting wild things.

I also found some Evergreen Blackberries, a native plant, and ate the ones that were ripe. Interesting that these little guys were just putting on their fruit in October. The Evergreen Blackberry is similar to the domestic blackberry but smaller and less productive. EB's are rare around here but common in rainy Western Washington. We also have a native strawberry that is very tasty when you can find them. And of course, nothing beats Huckleberries for flavor, which we have in abundance in our mountains.

Yes, a printed newspaper. I subscribe. Said newspaper is filled with local sports and other local news. Otherwise, it makes poor toilet paper.

Wes H.
 
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