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Deluxestogie Grow Log 2018

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With all their nooks and crannies, morel mushrooms can hide tiny insects. I toss the mushrooms into a dish of water, to encourage the insects to abandon ship. Since the stipe is hollow, I always slice the mushrooms in half to rinse them. Then...saute in butter.

Bob
That's another good reason, but Charly is referring to their monomethylhydrazine content which goes away when dried, sauteed, or fried.
 

deluxestogie

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My Share of Hurricane Michael



The remnants of this hurricane did not come here, but the rain was heavier than from the one that did.





It's at the severity level of messy and inconvenient, but nothing more. We'll have some additional wind tonight, but hopefully that won't be too much for my big maple trees.

I've been following the damage to the Florida panhandle fairly closely. I used to live in Panama City, while I was stationed at Tyndall AFB. I lived in Ft. Walton Beach while stationed at Eglin AFB. Eglin and Ft. Walton Beach weren't too severely hit, but both Panama City and Tyndall sustained extensive damage.

Aerial footage of Panama City and Mexico Beach (the point of landfall, just to the east of Tyndall) show many damaged houses. More dramatic are the scenes where about 80% of the houses are nothing but a concrete pad--not even any strewn rubble. Just swept away entirely.

Bob
 

OldDinosaurWesH

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Tobacco seedlings 10-14-18 first fall mushrooms.jpg

Left to right: Coral, King Boletus, Chanterelle. We finally had some rain, 7/10ths of an inch. The season is just starting. These are the first. Collected yesterday.
 

OldDinosaurWesH

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Ramaria is very much edible except that it is somewhat bland. We have two species here. The main bloom is in the spring. (Ramaria rasilispora & Ramaria botrytis) I'm still looking for Bear's Head (Hericium abietis), I know we have them, I have yet to find one though. Such is the luck of the draw on collecting wild things.

I also found some Evergreen Blackberries, a native plant, and ate the ones that were ripe. Interesting that these little guys were just putting on their fruit in October. The Evergreen Blackberry is similar to the domestic blackberry but smaller and less productive. EB's are rare around here but common in rainy Western Washington. We also have a native strawberry that is very tasty when you can find them. And of course, nothing beats Huckleberries for flavor, which we have in abundance in our mountains.

Yes, a printed newspaper. I subscribe. Said newspaper is filled with local sports and other local news. Otherwise, it makes poor toilet paper.

Wes H.
 

Charly

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soap ? what's this ?
... are you sure it's safe ?

We live in a world where people are losing the more elementary notions...
 

deluxestogie

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Are you sure you want to kill all those probiotics that are living on your hands?
That is actually an important point. We live in a culture of chemical remedy for bacterial issues that man has successfully dealt with for a hundred-thousand years. Basic hand washing has saved countless lives and prevented countless illnesses world-wide. But that's just the process of rinsing away poop, dirt and gunk from the hands.

I use only Ivory soap for my hands. Plain old white bar of ordinary, pure soap. For the shower, I use Kirk's Castile soap. Plain old white bar of pure soap.

Any soap that is "deodorant", anti-bacterial, or antiseptic does indeed disrupt normal skin flora, increasing your risk of an overgrowth of pathogenic bacteria. Yup, all that "anti-" stuff kills a lot of bacteria, but not the ones that you want to kill off. The same is true for those ubiquitous cleansing wipes and antiseptic wipes.

I admit that I posted the hand washing day notice simply because I think it is about as absurd a Global "X" Day as I can imagine. If it were instead "Global Don't Use Anti-bacterial Soap on Your Skin Day", then that would be meaningful.

Bob
 

OldDinosaurWesH

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Interesting, I also use Kirk's Hard Water Castile soap. Castile soap contains Calcium Sulfate, also known as gypsum or Selenite in its crystal form. Calcium Sulfate is also a major ingredient in Epsom Salts.

A friend turned me on to Kirk's back in the 80's and I've been using it ever since. Just plain clean. No perfumes, dyes, or other unnecessary ingredients. Kirk's is a brand name by the way, Castile is the variety of soap. Although I've never seen another brand of Castile soap. (We talked about Castile soap in Chemistry class.)

Wes H.
 

deluxestogie

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Traditional Castile soap is made entirely from a vegetable oil (was always olive oil, in the past) that is mixed with just enough lye to fully convert the oil into soap, with no lye left over. That's the basics of all plain soap--saponified fat. Since Castile soap (unlike many commercial soaps) is made with no lard or other animal fats, it is a frequent choice of members of various religious groups who observe dietary constraints regarding animals. It also makes vegans happy.

I have used it for decades simply because it cleans, and doesn't leave a slimy "moisturizer" film or perfume on my skin. Ivory bar soap is not quite as aggressive as Kirk's Castile, and is better suited to my already quite dry hands. Kirk's Castile is a wonderful shampoo as well. No softeners, stiffeners, etc. Your hair squeaks once it's rinsed.

There aren't more than a couple of commercial brands of Castile bar soap, since most people are afraid they might smell like a human. Often, boutique shops will carry artisanal Castile soaps made from the milk fat of various animals--goats, sheep, camels, llamas, yaks, etc.--but it's not really Castile soap.

Bob
 
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