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Whole Leaf Tobacco

Deluxestogie's Endoskeletal Wood Tobacco Kiln / Flue-cure chamber

Charly

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I think you should add at least one fan (I have 4 in my kiln) to ensure the air is well circulating, it helps the temperature and humidity to be the same everywhere in the kiln.
Even in well insulated kiln you can have condensation if your leaves are too close against the walls, let some place to allow the air to pass.
 

deluxestogie

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For a kiln the size of my kiln, you really need a fan. The least expensive fan for use in such a warm and humid environment is the kind designed as a bathroom exhaust fan. They come in "cheap" and "way over-priced". Mine cost about $15. Although I configured a speed control for my fan, I usually run it at full speed anyway, so you don't need that complication.

Bob
 

Valahnuk

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For a kiln the size of my kiln, you really need a fan. The least expensive fan for use in such a warm and humid environment is the kind designed as a bathroom exhaust fan. They come in "cheap" and "way over-priced". Mine cost about $15. Although I configured a speed control for my fan, I usually run it at full speed anyway, so you don't need that complication.

Bob
Well I do have a bathroom fan that I´m not using, but I´m not really sure how I would be able to mount it because I don´t have any frames inside the kiln like you do, it´s all styrofoam.

Do you think i just could attach it to some steel wires?
 

deluxestogie

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If you can place some reinforcing material (giant "fender" washers, or perhaps sheet metal) on both the inside and outside surfaces of bolt holes, that would allow you to mount it on a wall. Or you can place something similar on just the outer roof, and string the steel wire down to the fan.

Although my kiln fan usually is hooked onto the underside of my middle wire shelf, sometimes I have to remove that shelf. Then, I simply support the fan from two 17 gauge aluminum wires that hook onto the wire "shelf" near the top of the kiln. There is little vibration, and the fan is easily supported.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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Worked for me without a fan. Leaves touching the wall yellowed slightly slower then the rest. But that was 6 leaves.
I believe we're talking about different situations. Leaf goes into a kiln after it has cured. Your description sounds either like a flue-cure chamber or a curing chamber.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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The terms that all of us throw around for various heated boxes are not very clear: fermentation, curing, kilning, flue-curing, yellowing. Part of the problem is that, depending on one's present intention, and the temp selected, the very same box may be used for any of these procedures. And the descriptions and names we use (as well as the chambers themselves) have evolved over the past decade.

Bob
 

Valahnuk

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If you can place some reinforcing material (giant "fender" washers, or perhaps sheet metal) on both the inside and outside surfaces of bolt holes, that would allow you to mount it on a wall. Or you can place something similar on just the outer roof, and string the steel wire down to the fan.

Although my kiln fan usually is hooked onto the underside of my middle wire shelf, sometimes I have to remove that shelf. Then, I simply support the fan from two 17 gauge aluminum wires that hook onto the wire "shelf" near the top of the kiln. There is little vibration, and the fan is easily supported.

Bob
Now i have a fan in the kiln!
Perhaps not the most professional installation, but it works.
 

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