• Dear Guest,

    We've been using a forum format called vBulletin for over seven years and the program is no longer being developed, so that means no more updates or security patches. vBulletin has never been compatible with search engine optimization and it does not support the multitude of various devices most people use to access the internet, so it's time to say goodbye to vBulletin.

    For these reasons we have moved our forum to a new format that will support and encourage growth for the next generation of grower and DIY tobacco users.

    So please post any issues you're having with using the new site.

    As usual, you may login with your old password.

Whole Leaf Tobacco

Easy method for oily wrappers

Gdaddy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2014
Messages
673
Likes
137
Points
43
Location
Lake Mary, Fl
#1
There's no question that an oily wrapper looks more inviting to most people. I've look at them and wonder why or what kind of leaf can have that much oil to leave a sheen on the cigar.

However, as Jorge Padron points out...

"There are some manufacturers that use some sort of oil to give their cigars the "oily sheen" on the wrapper," said Jorge. "I am not sure what type of oil it is or how it is applied. Needless to say that Padron Cigars would never even consider doing something like this. Much has been talked about oily wrappers and how consumers should look upon this as a positive attribute of a cigar. At Padron we look at oily wrappers as wrappers that have not been fermented completely."

If, after reading this, you still would like an oily sheen then there is an easy way.

I thought this was worth sharing....

There have been many reports of using glycol, glycerin and even mineral oil to enhance the wrapper to give that nice oily look that some cigars have. I've tried the oils and found they don't come close to the desired result. They make the wrapper burn poorly and can remain sticky. Attracting dirt and dust. Not good.

The 'La Flor Dominicana Double Ligero Chisel Maduro' is one example of a beautiful 'oily' wrapper. I love the deep rich look of this cigar so I used it as my model.

large-la_flor_dom_dbl_ligero_chisel_mad_box.jpg

The thing I find is that these cigars don't feel oily. They feel dry to the touch.


For you wood workers....Anyone who has ever done any finishing on raw wood knows how a clear coat of lacquer or varnish brings out the vibrant color of the under lying wood grain. It makes the wood color and grain pop big time.

Here's what I've used that gave desired results...

1/2 cup of warm water mix 1 tablespoon of black strap molasses. Pretty simple, cheap and easy to apply.

When laying out the wrapper the leaf gets wet down with this solution especially focused on the finished side of the wrapper. Roll the cigar and smooth the solution over the surface when finished. Don't get too heavy with it. A light coat is just fine and looks more natural. If you decide you want more shine then add a second coat as the first coat begins to dry. Lay it out to dry. Believe it or not this will completely dry out in a day. Totally dry to the touch yet a nice sheen will remain. No oily feel.

The wrapper I used was a nice size dark ligero leaf. When this solution is applied the color of the tobacco comes alive just like clear coat on the wood. Beautiful and even darker in color.

Once dried for a few days the cigar had no sent/odor of molasses and no one knew it had been applied. They smelled like cigar tobacco. Just the sheen remained along with the gorgeous color.

This will enhance any wrapper leaf not just the dark maduro's. If you want an oily appearance... give this a try.

These are my sticks... Not a great photo and it was under a bright halogen light to show detail. At night they look almost black in color. The darkest cigars I've rolled. Notice the enhanced highlights revealing the mottling of the natural tobacco. The molasses doesn't add the color. It is NOT like adding a stain but more of a clear coat. The sheen is identical and matched perfectly to the La Flor Dominica.

One last point... they burned extremely well for having so little time on them.

The top two were hand rolled and the bottom one was put in a mold.


Ligero.jpg
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
12,398
Likes
1,266
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
#6
Some of my top leaf just comes out glossy--"oily" if you will. This is leaf that is fully fermented and aged. I don't have a method. Some of it just come out that way.

Vuelta Abajo, Machu Picchu Havana and Florida Sumatra (as well as Hickory Pryor) are prone to yielding glossy oscuro from the top leaf, with full fermentation. The taste tends to be slightly sweet and earthy.

Bob
 

webmost

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2013
Messages
1,762
Likes
101
Points
63
Location
Newark DE
#9
Tried this trick using Karo (blackstrap too dark for my sticks). Didn't work out much. Looks like a glazed doughnut.


The naked one above actually has a muted shine which doesn't show in the pic.
 

Gdaddy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2014
Messages
673
Likes
137
Points
43
Location
Lake Mary, Fl
#10
I didn't try Karo but you might try using a little less. May take a little experimentation to get the perfect appearance.

BTW... I really like the shape!
 

USHOG

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 30, 2014
Messages
240
Likes
18
Points
0
Location
Iola, Texas
#12
Have a question for those that grow wrappers how can I make a more oily looking wrapper? Is there anything I can do to add to the sheen to the leaf during the growing process? I know how to manipulate the thickness by lowering or raising the available light but what else can we do to improve the wrappers we grow during the growing period?
 

rainmax

Well-Known Member
Founding Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2013
Messages
966
Likes
105
Points
43
Location
Ljubljana, Slovenia
#13
One lady told me that composted horse manure and peanuts seeds gives the shine and elasticity to the wrapper. I haven't tried yet.

Bravo Gdaddy...
 

USHOG

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 30, 2014
Messages
240
Likes
18
Points
0
Location
Iola, Texas
#14
I was thinking neem oil and peanut oil in the soil is my next test on wrapper leaves. I have figured out that high magnesium doses gives the leaves some crackling sounds but makes it taste not so good, but it sure greens the leaves up nicely
 

Tutu

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2016
Messages
669
Likes
134
Points
43
Location
Dominican Republic
#15
I am fully agreeing with Bob on this topic here. Any good cigar variety may come out oily looking after thorough fermentation. Some varieties are just more prone to do so than others. Top leaf has a higher tendency as well. Varieties that are more dark will be more prone. But in the end, if you over-ferment Besuki, especially the top leaf, it will come out oily looking as well
 
Top