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Whole Leaf Tobacco

Exceptional tobacco does not go bad.

burge

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#1
In response to Levi having all that tobacco and getting overwhelmed a bit. Exceptional meaning quality tobacco does not go bad. it does not go stale. it just gets better and better with age. Mist the tobacco and let it dry and keep repeating that formula. Temperature swings help age tobacco. Tobacco never goes bad. I have some of Dons Virginia lemon that is going on 5 years old just left in the vapor proof bags. I had some of it last year and it was really good. When you open the bag it will have a ammonia smell. Don't be afraid to buy in quantity when a sale happens you will be ever so amazed in how it changes and always for the better.
 

Levi Gross

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#2
Having a stockpile of good tobacco to play with the ultimate goal! Once I get my crop in I will really be spinning my wheels. I need to do some more reading up on aging and fermenting as well. I have read somewhere exactly what you just posted that misting it and letting it dry.... repeat repeat.... That it really helps age and change the character of the Tobacco for the better.
 

OldDinosaurWesH

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#3
I'm now in my third year of growing. Last year I grew 240 plants of 13 different types. 240 plants are a lot more than I can use in a year. I wanted to have a surplus in order that I could age my tobacco. I leave it hanging in my basement. You can walk through the strings and stalks and smell the aroma. That aroma just keeps getting better, and stronger with time. One variety in particular has a nice floral scent. I'm re-growing more of this type this year. Along with 7 other types that are new to me. (146 plants this year.)

I just finished up shredding and blending 1 Kg. of my aged tobacco. This is the mildest and best flavored batch I have ever put together.

When it come to tobacco, patience is a virtue.

Wes H.
 

OldDinosaurWesH

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#5
Golden Burley. Seed from northwoodseeds.

Tobacco Seedlings 8-11-17 67.jpg

Long (30 to 32") slender leaves, 5 - 6 " wide. 5 to 6 feet tall. They look a little like a short stemmed palm tree. I had 12 last year, I planted 16 this year.

Wes H.
 

OldDinosaurWesH

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#8
Golden Burley has a nice floral fragrance when cured. You can smell it in the smoke when you burn it. GB still has that Burley flavor to it. I have...14 different types hanging in my basement in various states of curing. The mixture of aromas are hard to describe. I sent some 30 day kilned Bolivia Criollo Black (for cigar making) to one of the members last winter & he seemed to like it. I have good growing conditions here, and seem to be able to produce some fairly mellow tobacco.

I have just a small amount of Brown and Williamson low nicotine left over from my first year (2016). Initially I hated it. But since the B&W has hung for nearly two years, it has mellowed and is now a decent, but not great, cigarette tobacco.

I have received some cured tobacco from a couple of other members, (not mentioning any names here) and some of this was pretty rude stuff. Growing conditions definitely make a difference.

I live in the wheat belt region of the pacific northwest and we have excellent soils and good growing conditions for wheat and other grassy plants. Add some irrigation, and you have good conditions for tobacco growing. Best yet, we don't have Horn-Worms!

Wes H.

Oh...and I fertilize the heck out of mine. That's how I get my best results.
 

FmGrowit

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#10
Somebody must send me some of this Golden Burley you speak of. I've never smoked a Burley worth selling except for a little toasted Burley I was able to find.
Perhaps I'll contract a grow for this variety next year or maybe I'll just grow it myself.
 

skychaser

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#14
Somebody must send me some of this Golden Burley you speak of. I've never smoked a Burley worth selling except for a little toasted Burley I was able to find.
Perhaps I'll contract a grow for this variety next year or maybe I'll just grow it myself.
I can probably spare a few leaves. I may even have a string left that has aged a couple of years. I like it's light flavor and mellow smoke (for a burley) but also that it is super easy to cure and dry, and it ages quickly. You can smoke it in 3 months. Much like Harrow Velvet in that respect. I put in a little over a hundred of those too.

The leaves are very similar to Silver River. But Silver River gets HUGE and matures much later. I have a heck of a time getting seed because of my short growing season. It is officially an unclassified strain, but personally I would classify it as a white stemmed burley. I have a few SR's growing this year too.

The story I recall is that it was given to Don ? (or maybe it was Lonnie?) by another farmer who had some old tobacco seeds in a drawer, and all it had was "Silver River" written on it. I have never grown any other tobaccos quite like it. It's an awesome plant. I need to send Jessica some seed and let her grow it out. Maybe she has seen it before and can match it up to something in the USDA collection.
 

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FmGrowit

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#16
Damn, this thread is really giving me the itch to grow again. I think it's time to find some more farmland.

I'm having a hard time recalling whether SR was from the "Old Farm" or if it was from the local guy who I gave a bunch of plants to. He passed away a few years ago, so there's nobody to ask.
 

FmGrowit

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#17
Well, now that I'm taking that trip down memory lane, I do recall how I actually got into this mess...YTB, and it's a Burley. Smoked the lugs right off the plant...in the field. That was some damn fine baccer and I made the mistake of sharing it with some friends. Life hasn't been the same since.
 

OldDinosaurWesH

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#18
I have grown "Golden Seal Special" that I got from a no-name seed company. GSS is substantially different from Golden Burley in its growth habit and its flavor. The photo posted by Bob a few posts back closely resembles my Golden Burley from last year.

tobacco seedlings 45 white stem burley.jpg

Sorry about the photo quality, Golden Seal Special front and center of this phone camera shot from 2016. The leaves are much broader, shorter and less numerous than Golden Burley. I only had four of these (GSS) and the yields were poor. Each produced 13 or 14 leaves. This was before I'd heard of northwoodseeds, and growing tobacco was a complete long-shot "can I really do this?" I've learned a lot since then.

Wes H.

There are so many different types out there, and limited space to plant them, I haven't looked back. On to bigger and better!
 

Levi Gross

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#20
I have grown "Golden Seal Special" that I got from a no-name seed company. GSS is substantially different from Golden Burley in its growth habit and its flavor. The photo posted by Bob a few posts back closely resembles my Golden Burley from last year.

View attachment 23890

Sorry about the photo quality, Golden Seal Special front and center of this phone camera shot from 2016. The leaves are much broader, shorter and less numerous than Golden Burley. I only had four of these (GSS) and the yields were poor. Each produced 13 or 14 leaves. This was before I'd heard of northwoodseeds, and growing tobacco was a complete long-shot "can I really do this?" I've learned a lot since then.

Wes H.

There are so many different types out there, and limited space to plant them, I haven't looked back. On to bigger and better!
I too went for a long shot one day and started rifling through my grandmas seed catalogs and came across a book called the Tobacco Cultivators Handbook and that Golden Seal Special is what came with It. I was not impressed with my smoke but grew some nice plants and here we are today. On to bigger and better tobacco
 
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