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Whole Leaf Tobacco

Exceptional tobacco does not go bad.

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#21
I too went for a long shot one day and started rifling through my grandmas seed catalogs and came across a book called the Tobacco Cultivators Handbook and that Golden Seal Special is what came with It. I was not impressed with my smoke but grew some nice plants and here we are today. On to bigger and better tobacco
My first year of successful curing, I grew Gold Seal Special Burley. I got the seed from a website in British Columbia. It snowed and I picked it too early. It's still terrible after 4 years of aging, but then again, I had no idea what I was doing back then.

Here's a photo.
 

OldDinosaurWesH

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#22
I only bagged one plant of Golden Burley last season. I have 7 or 8 grams of GB seed in my little collection.

I sent some (a few 100) GB seeds to one of the other members last winter. I don't know however, if he actually grew any of these.

I planted 16 GB's this year. So far, they are some of my best looking seedlings, but you never know what mother nature will throw at you.

As I've said, I got my original GB seed from northwoodseed. I'll bet he has more.

All I can say, is that after 30 days in the kiln, GB came out with a nice floral fragrence.

Wes H.
 

Levi Gross

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#23
My first year of successful curing, I grew Gold Seal Special Burley. I got the seed from a website in British Columbia. It snowed and I picked it too early. It's still terrible after 4 years of aging, but then again, I had no idea what I was doing back then.

Here's a photo.
That is to funny. I started to grow it again this year but gave the plants away to a friend of mine who does not even use tobacco. It just brings up childhood memories for him in the fields of Tennessee. I’m still struggling with curing China... I know it will all work out though and I know what I am growing next year!!! Golden Burley!!
 

Levi Gross

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#24
I only bagged one plant of Golden Burley last season. I have 7 or 8 grams of GB seed in my little collection.

I sent some (a few 100) GB seeds to one of the other members last winter. I don't know however, if he actually grew any of these.

I planted 16 GB's this year. So far, they are some of my best looking seedlings, but you never know what mother nature will throw at you.

As I've said, I got my original GB seed from northwoodseed. I'll bet he has more.

All I can say, is that after 30 days in the kiln, GB came out with a nice floral fragrence.

Wes H.
I will be ordering some ASAP and I have to get this kiln deal going.
 

burge

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#25
I have never liked Burley and only a couple I have tried that for me I could smoke 1 is Don's double toasted burley and Bigs yellow twist bud. China as mentioned bad leaf is bad leaf you may however still be able to salvage it. Moisten it and try to re kiln it. Toast in then remoisten and toast it again. When that happens to a bad tobacco its cased to hgh heaven and sold as a value brand.
 

deluxestogie

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#26
But...but...but Harrow Velvet Burley is a Canadian burley! That's my preferred home-grown burley. It cures to as bright a color as Virginia lemon flue-cured, and seems milder than Golden Burley.

Seriously, there is a huge difference among burley varieties, as well as from the bottom of the stalk to the top. Although I have rolled, smoked and enjoyed cigars made entirely of burley red tip (from BigBonner), the leaf needs to be kilned first, in order to use it like that. In general, burley is used in cigarettes and pipe tobacco as an ingredient below 50% (sometimes as just a minor condiment). A cigar binder of burley interacts in a magical and delicious way beneath a wrapper of CT Broadleaf.

Burley has a higher nicotine content than flue-cured, and also a higher pH, meaning that more of the nicotine is absorbed. But you simply can not duplicate the nutty flavor and full body of burley with other varieties. Burley is usually more hygroscopic than flue-cured Virginia, a property that may slow a hot-burning burley/VA blend.

And I will say that some of the most godawful commercial tobacco I've ever encountered (India Dark Air) is a brilliant addition to a cigar filler blend that would otherwise be too mild and flavorless. The matter of "bad" tobacco is usually just the challenge of discovering its proper use.

I will heartily agree that when smoking a pure tobacco varietal (without blending), exceptional tobacco cannot be created from mediocre tobacco through manipulations. If stored improperly, even exceptional tobacco can lose some of its loveliness.

Bob
 
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