• Dear Guest,

    We've been using a forum format called vBulletin for over seven years and the program is no longer being developed, so that means no more updates or security patches. vBulletin has never been compatible with search engine optimization and it does not support the multitude of various devices most people use to access the internet, so it's time to say goodbye to vBulletin.

    For these reasons we have moved our forum to a new format that will support and encourage growth for the next generation of grower and DIY tobacco users.

    So please post any issues you're having with using the new site.

    As usual, you may login with your old password.

Whole Leaf Tobacco

Hasankeyf

istanbulin

Moderator
Founding Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Messages
1,290
Likes
132
Points
3
Location
Stockton, CA
#1
Hasankeyf tobacco which is a N. rustica variety has different characteristics than other tobacco varieties grown in Turkey which are mostly N. tabacum. Hasankeyf is grown in Gaziantep province in southestern Turkey, nearby Syrian border. It’s locally called as “deli tütün” (wild tobacco). Unlike Oriental tobaccos Hasankeyf is grown in plain soils that well irrigated and fertilized. It’s also topped for promoting leaf growth and reaching higher levels of nicotine. It’s told that (a rumour) Hasankeyf is introduced from Isfahan region of Iran.

gaz.JPG
Location of Gaziantep.

Nicotine content of Hasankeyf is higher than other types of tobaccos, like other N. rustica varieties. Leaves have approx. 5.0% of nicotine but may reach higher levels if more fertilizer used.

Height of the plant is 60-100 cm and a single plant produces 8-12 useful leaves. After topping, size of the upper leaves are 25-30 cm in length and 15-20 cm in width. Lower leaves are smaller and are about 15-20 cm in length and 7-10 cm in width. Leaves are petiolate, thick, dark gren and not flexible.

h2.JPG ....... h1.JPG
Photo of a Hasankeyf plant from Jessica's thesis. .........Photo of a Hasankeyf plant in a field.

Hasankeyf variety has no domestic usage in Turkey but some of the local growers use it as snuss with placing it into cigarette rolling paper and call it "ağız otu" (mouth weed). Nearly all of the Hasankeyf tobaccos are exported to Egypt and used for hookah tobacco production by blending it with dark air cured tobaccos of Italy and Malawi.

mara.JPG
"Ağız otu"

In the past farmers used to sow seeds directly to soil in spring but now they first grow seedlings in seed beds and then transplant it to field. Within the growing period the fields are irrigated at least 8-10 times. After formation of the flower, plant is topped and 8-12 leaves are left on the plant. Suckering should be controlled not only after topping but also in growing period. Generally 4 weeks after topping plants are ready to harvest. Hasankeyf is stalk harvested but plant/stalk divied into 2-3 parts while stringing and then sun cured.

diz.JPG
Sun cured Hasankeyf.

Fermentation takes an important place for Hasankeyf. Sun cured dry leaves may be green to yellow or tan colored. Afer 50-60 days of fermentation in "kürsü" (pilone), leaves turn brown and it’s reddish tones.

pi.JPG
Fermentation in "kürsü" (pilone) (with stalk parts).

Companies buy Hasankeyf tobacco from farmers with it's stalks (not stripped) so they strip them and package the leaves with canvas clothes, this bales called as “tonga” and are 40-50 kg in weight.

çuval.JPG ............ tong.JPG
A "tonga" bale of Hasankeyf.

Now the exportation can begin. Who knows, may be some of world famous hookah tobaccos (generally flavored i.e. Nakhla) contains Hasankeyf.
 

bonehead

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2013
Messages
761
Likes
17
Points
0
Location
southington, ct.
#5
Yes all the seasons have their advantage ... Fall/winter = scheduling time.
i am trying to plan and procure new seeds from nothwoodseeds.com. i sen't in one order then sen't in another. i better be careful or i won't have a lawn to cut.come to think of it i don't need a lawn because when i weedwack around the edge of the patch grass gets stuck to my mudlugs and i work to hard to deal with that.
 

leverhead

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2012
Messages
3,055
Likes
76
Points
48
Location
Grimes County Texas
#6
Interesting information, thank you! This variety will be the first Rustica I've grown. What's the traditional row/plant spacing? It looks pretty close plant to plant. I doubt that I will grow enough plants to make a pile that size to ferment naturally. Do you think the fermentation could be done in a kiln?
 

istanbulin

Moderator
Founding Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Messages
1,290
Likes
132
Points
3
Location
Stockton, CA
#7
Traditional spacing is 80x40 cm. I'm sure a kiln will work quite good, growers use pile method because it's cheaper (no heating expense).
 

istanbulin

Moderator
Founding Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Messages
1,290
Likes
132
Points
3
Location
Stockton, CA
#9
you're such a great resource to have! even I am learning new things =)
I guess, the most interesting part for you (let's say for Hasankeyf) is meeting with the "real life" of the variety. As a GRIN accession Hasankeyf is a "number", an "object" to carry some researches on it. But when a scientist realizes that a single variety has a great impact on people's lifes, traditions and has it's own history, that variety becomes "alive". Ethnobotanists are better on this matter. May be I'm over sensitive but it's obvious that our passion of standardization is ruining both varieties and the people.
Don't disregard this man, you may learn more and have a good career of science not money :). Joking aside, thank you colleague.
 

JessicaNicot

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2013
Messages
417
Likes
42
Points
0
Location
Raleigh, NC
#10
I guess, the most interesting part for you (let's say for Hasankeyf) is meeting with the "real life" of the variety. As a GRIN accession Hasankeyf is a "number", an "object" to carry some researches on it. But when a scientist realizes that a single variety has a great impact on people's lifes, traditions and has it's own history, that variety becomes "alive". Ethnobotanists are better on this matter. May be I'm over sensitive but it's obvious that our passion of standardization is ruining both varieties and the people.
Don't disregard this man, you may learn more and have a good career of science not money :). Joking aside, thank you colleague.
finding the stories behind the varieties in the collection is also very interesting for me too. so much of what we have has no information associated with it and I think that's awful.
 
Top