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Whole Leaf Tobacco

Heirloom American Indian Tobacco lines

PeacePipe

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#1
Curious if anyone else here might be growing any of the older tobacco genetics of Turtle Island. The most commonly known would be the Rustica but this plant too has been highly adapted to many regions and varies in stock. I grow the Iroquois/Algonquin line. It was found growing in the wild of both Michigan and Ontario after decades and possibly centuries untold.

The other type I am growing is an ancient mother to common Burley. It is nothing like the modern Burley found within the seed banks or commercial fields, even though it appears to look just the same as any common Burley. The seeds where from an ancient vault and have been shared through tribal members and associations..

Neither can be considered to be everyday smoking material unless one includes ceremonial use. The samples I have given to Burley lovers threw them off and they did not like it lol.. The Rustica on the other hand is strictly for ceremony but I doubt anyone would want to smoke it by itself unless one really wants nicotine agony and its onset...
 
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#2
That's very interesting. Sadly, I've no use to grow rustica because I'm after flavour, not a buzz. It would be interesting to have a primitive Burley, but it might drive me nuts, not knowing exactly what it was.

Ceremonial tobacco is a big topic. As a white guy, I believe it would be cultural appropriation to treat it like I knew what it meant to First Nations people. Nevertheless, I find it sacred to a point. There is something very different from buying a pack of smokes, and having a 5 minute indulgence versus planting, nurturing, curing, aging, cutting by hand, packing a bowl and savouring.
 

PeacePipe

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#4
That's very interesting. Sadly, I've no use to grow rustica because I'm after flavour, not a buzz. It would be interesting to have a primitive Burley, but it might drive me nuts, not knowing exactly what it was.

Ceremonial tobacco is a big topic. As a white guy, I believe it would be cultural appropriation to treat it like I knew what it meant to First Nations people. Nevertheless, I find it sacred to a point. There is something very different from buying a pack of smokes, and having a 5 minute indulgence versus planting, nurturing, curing, aging, cutting by hand, packing a bowl and savouring.

Much respect found in your words and perspective..I fully agree as well with your sentiment about the art and feelings that come with this procedure verses just picking up a processed tobacco and smoking it.. We all put our own essence into what we grow, one way or another just by observance along with the other aspects of care and attention that is involved from striking seeds to smoking the finished product...

We smoke Rustica... 4 like 2 like not...To smoke this tobacco makes serene
see the plug, it's rustica (Mapacho)

http://www.pipegazette.com/2016/03/au-fumoir-du-cubana-cafe-video.html
Beautiful, I wish more knowledge was known here of the North-East woodlands entheogen aspects and rituals lost through assimilation and time..That Mapacho is known here as Asayma (Algonquin/Ojibwe) and Oyeaugwa (Iroqouin/Mohawk) and highly revered.. I have a deep respect for the cultures in South America that still use it in ceremonies such as the Ayahuasca.. But I do admit to seeing several Native pipe keepers here getting awfully giddy over freshly dried green Rustica lolz.. Its very uplifting to say the least as long as you smoke it in moderation..Once you cross the line its a major depressant for some folks ........
 

Chicken

redneck grower
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#5
Very curious of this "" ancient vault "" you spoke of.

Can you elaborate on that ?
 

SenorRojo

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#6
I am a new grower, I recently got some seeds of N Rustica "Azteca" and "Hopi" I am growing them for their spiritual purposes, I don't actually smoke cigarettes regularly. I sowed the seeds today so I am very excited.
 

SmokesAhoy

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#7
Here you go chicken, only the very brave should enter ancient vault for special seed.
vaultb.jpg
 

Levi Gross

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#11
Yes! Very much. Please!!! And I may have some seeds for you if interested.
1. Ta 101 Goldenseal special 2. I-35 Insect Resistant 3. Pennsylvania Red 4. Samsun Maden 5. Mississippi Heirloom 6. K 358 7. Little Yellow 8. Red Russian 9. Orinoco Oily
 
Joined
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#12
Im from AZ originally. Im indian(Tohono O'odham) I grow a variety that an elder gave me a while back ago. The elder said its been with him before the spanish reached AZ. Let me tell you its some of the strongest ive had. I also grow a variety that i give to elders and family for everyday use. I call it I'itoi(Elder Brother) tobacco. I got that one from a friend that says its been in his family for a very very long time. Its not rustica so its more mellow but the one i mentioned first is a rustica.
 

deluxestogie

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#13
Welcome to the forum, Mrflufay. Feel free to introduce yourself in the Introduce Yourself forum, and consider adding your general location to your profile (so it will appear beside each of your posts).

Since Nicotiana rustica has been intentionally cultivated in the desert southwest for at least several thousand years, your elder's tobacco could well be of Hohokam origin.

I've grown the N. tabacum varieties Papante and Mt. Pima, and even crossed them with the quite similar looking Little Dutch. I saved the seed of those crosses, but have never propagated them.

I personally do not enjoy smoking N. rustica, but a number of forum members grow various varieties of it.

Bob
 
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#14
Thanks for the welcome deluxestogie, how did you cross the two species? Did you use a brush because i've tried and failed to cross them. I also looked up the varieties you said but mines don't look like that they look more like the Hopi variety with wrinkly leaves and greenish-yellow flowers.
 

deluxestogie

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#15
Crossing tobacco: http://fairtradetobacco.com/threads/1084-How-to-Intentionally-Cross-Tobacco-Varieties

Crossing varieties of N. tabacum with one another is fairly straightforward.

Crossing N. tabacum with N. rustica usually doesn't work, though in the rare instances that it does, it's N. tabacum pollen on a N. rustica pistil. There is a separate thread on that: http://fairtradetobacco.com/threads/7679-N-Tabacum-x-N-Rustica

Also, you might want to bookmark the Index to Key Forum Threads: http://fairtradetobacco.com/threads/3868-Key-threads-in-the-FTT-forum

Bob
 
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