• Dear Guest,

    We've been using a forum format called vBulletin for over seven years and the program is no longer being developed, so that means no more updates or security patches. vBulletin has never been compatible with search engine optimization and it does not support the multitude of various devices most people use to access the internet, so it's time to say goodbye to vBulletin.

    For these reasons we have moved our forum to a new format that will support and encourage growth for the next generation of grower and DIY tobacco users.

    So please post any issues you're having with using the new site.

    As usual, you may login with your old password.

Whole Leaf Tobacco

How Hurricanes Kill People

deluxestogie

Administrator
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
12,542
Likes
1,386
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
#1
What Killed People During Hurricane Irma?
FL, GA, NC: 4 Sep 2017 through 10 Oct 2017

This interesting analysis from the CDC of the actual causes of death related to Hurricane Irma in 2017 debunks some common assertions (e.g. the false warning that most deaths are from flooding)
https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/mm6730a5.htm?s_cid=mm6730a5_e

129 people died as a result of the storm or its immediate aftermath, but less than 6% of those deaths were from flooding, and another 3% from tree-related injuries.

A staggering 115 people (89+%) died from indirect hurricane causes. Percentages shown below are of the total deaths. The top 3 are in bold face.

[table="width: 500"][tr][td]Stress-related cardiac disease[/td][td]23[/td][td]17.8%[/td][/tr]
[tr][td]Heat-related[/td][td]17[/td][td]13.2%[/td][/tr]
[tr][td]Oxygen-dependent[/td][td] 3[/td][td]2.3%[/td][/tr]
[tr][td]Disruption of emergency medical services[/td][td]3[/td][td]2.3%[/td][/tr]
[tr][td]Floodwater infection[/td][td]2[/td][td]1.6%[/td][/tr]
[tr][td][/td][td][/td][td][/td][/tr]
[tr][td]Carbon monoxide poisoning[/td][td]16[/td][td]12.4%[/td][/tr]
[tr][td]Preparation/Repair injury[/td][td]15[/td][td]11.6%[/td][/tr]
[tr][td]Motor vehicle crash[/td][td]13[/td][td]10.1%[/td][/tr]
[tr][td]Falls from standing height (elderly)[/td][td]13[/td][td]10.1%[/td][/tr]
[tr][td]Other[/td][td]12[/td][td]9.3%[/td][/tr][/table]

So, cardiac stress, heat stress, carbon monoxide, prepping and repairing, motor vehicle crashes together account for 65% of the deaths, plus another 10% for old people being knocked over.

The mere acts of preparing for the storm, providing emergency power, and repairing storm damage led to a quarter of all hurricane related deaths.

Bob
 

CobGuy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Messages
504
Likes
102
Points
43
Location
Central Arizona
#2
Wow ... that's some really interesting stat's!
Seems like the advice, "stay calm and stay put" may have some real bearing in these instances.
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
12,542
Likes
1,386
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
#3
Well, those numbers don't tell everything. For example, people died preparing for the storm, but we don't know how many lives were saved by preparation. People died from motor vehicle crashes, but we don't know how many lives were saved by evacuating high risk areas.

But the report does loudly tell us that how we handle ourselves both before and after a hurricane may be as important to survival as during the actual storm. It also carries the same lesson as snow storms: clearing your walkway or driveway can kill you.

Bob
 

CobGuy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2015
Messages
504
Likes
102
Points
43
Location
Central Arizona
#4
It also carries the same lesson as snow storms: clearing your walkway or driveway can kill you.
Which is why you should hire disposable, punk kids to do it for you! LOL :)
Growing up in central Illinois taught me a lot about shoveling snow and how NOT to do it.
Smaller scoops and a calm pace will save the ole ticker some stress.
As for prepping, the time for that is now and not after being told the event is coming ... avoid the rush of madness.

-Darin
 
Top