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Whole Leaf Tobacco

Hurricane Florence expected to cause loss of 150 million pounds of FCV.

FmGrowit

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#1
Heads up, Fair Warning, don't say I didn't tell you.

If this hurricane stays on track and at it's expected strength, the American Flue Cured Tobacco crop is expected to get hammered.

There is a real possibility that I won't be able to buy any FCV this year and nobody has any idea what is going to happen to the price.
It might not be a bad idea to stock up while you can.
 

deluxestogie

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#3
Tobacco Farmer Newsletter. 5 Sep 2018 said:
How much flue-cured has been harvested? As of September 4, USDA estimated that 91 percent of the Georgia crop, 70 percent of the South Carolina crop, 58 percent of the North Carolina crop and 58 percent of the Virginia crop had been harvested.

http://modtob.blogspot.com/2018/
It looks like what has already been harvested is unlikely to meet current contracts.

Bob
 

FmGrowit

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#4
I was told 150 million pounds represents 25% of the crop. The biggest fear is losing power to the barns that are curing tobacco right now.
One thing is for certain, there will be a lot of people working with little or no sleep for the next few days.
 

deluxestogie

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#5
Well, they've had enough advance warning to avoid being caught in the middle of a 5 day run--unless they are really pressing their luck. I guess 3 or 4 days of flue-curing, followed by a hiatus is way better than tobacco in the field ending up in a neighboring county. The Roanoke barns are heated with gas (propane maybe), but their controllers, baffles and fans are electric. A generator could take care of that.

For me, flue-curing is stressful for even my teeny tiny hobby grows of Virginias. I find it hard to imagine entire acres of leaf at stake in a single flue-cure run. I do wish them luck.

Bob
 
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#8
Not sure if this is good news but they expect the storm to move over the Carolinas
This is the problem. Obviously, any lost crop is terrible for every individual farmer, but if you look at Bob's post, a few back, you will see that N. Carolina, and Virginia are tied as the furthest behind on their harvest numbers, and have the most to lose.
 

deluxestogie

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#14
CNBC 12 Sep 2018 said:
Hurricane Matthew caused widespread damage and destruction to the Carolinas after making landfall in South Carolina back in 2016, devastating South Carolina's peanut crop as well as its cotton and soybeans. The 2016 storm also was blamed for killing more than 200,000 chickens.

"Matthew was the worst thing I ever lived through as far as natural disasters," said Ott. "We called it a '1,000-year flood' during Matthew, so I hope we don't get another one of those."

About 50 percent of the tobacco produced in the U.S. comes from North Carolina. The tobacco production alone represented about $724 million to the state's economy last year.

"We probably still have 50 percent of our tobacco in the field," said Wooten. "When you get 40, 50 and 60 mph winds, that tobacco will basically be done. What's not blown off will be rendered useless."

Wooten said farmers are "feverishly trying to get tobacco into barns. But when they get it into barns, they are still not through, because it's important that you have air to dry that tobacco."

Virginia also has tobacco still being harvested and could get heavy rainfall from Hurricane Florence. As of last week, only 65 percent of the flue-cured tobacco was harvested in the state, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Tobacco in bulk-curing barns requires a constant supply of electrical power, so Wooten said farmers are getting back-up generators ready since there's a good chance power could go down due to the storm.

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/09/12/fro...e-in-the-bulls-eye-of-hurricane-florence.html
Bob
 
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