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Whole Leaf Tobacco

Is binder an important component in your blend?

Charly

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#2
With my little experience, I say : Yes :)
You can make two cigars : one made with only one tobacco strain and a second one in wich you change just the binder.
I am sure you will feel the difference ;)
 
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#3
I rarely used binder until I recently got the Dominican binder. I just used multiple layers of wrapper before, or a particularly good seco leaf. There's definitely a difference in taste, and they're easier to work with to get a solid cigar with a good draw. I just need to acquire some more binders. I also have the PA binder. It's more neutral in flavor and sort of "blandifies" a cigar if it's not flavorful to begin with.
 

Tutu

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#4
Haha I'm trying to figure out how different layers of wrapper and a binder is a different thing. I think I get what you're saying but in your words, how are they different things?
 

webmost

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#5
Haha I'm trying to figure out how different layers of wrapper and a binder is a different thing. I think I get what you're saying but in your words, how are they different things?
One's right under your nose and right on your tongue. It tends to be delicate in order to make a smooth appearance and slick feel.

The other has to be strong enough to hold the bunch firm.

Both make a diff in how it tastes.
 

Tutu

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#6
Haha I know the difference between a wrapper and a binder. I'm just saying, if you have two layers of wrapper, how would the taste effect of the "first wrapper" you're putting on be different to the effect a binder has on taste.
 

SmokesAhoy

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#7
All I use are binders and I taste the binder more than the filler usually
 

Tutu

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#8
If all you use are binders then the outside binder will have the same effect as what usually the wrapper would have, influencing the taste quite a lot. At least for 20 to 30% I would say.

My point though, is that whether you call it a double wrapper or a binder, as well as whether you call it a double binder or a wrapper doesn't really matter. The leaf on the outside which you see and to much affects the taste, we all know. The question put in this thread is whether the leaf that holds the fillers has a lot of effect on the taste. Regardless of whether it's called a double wrapper or a binder.
 

MarcL

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#9
I believe all the components play an important role. As well as amount and, placement of the components. at times I'll use more then one leaf type for binder. I won't limit any advertised designation to that position. I believe there are almost an endless amount of blend combinations to be had in any given set choice of leaves due to positioning, conditioning, placement priming and vitola.
 

Tutu

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#10
The combinations are endless indeed. I played around with double binders too after I saw that video posted here a while back with the lady placing two binders at once in a very neat way. For me personally, making cigars usually has the purpose of seeing whether a leaf is fully fermented yet. I use an old crop for filler, then use a recent crop for wrapper. Unfermented leafs curl when burning as a wrapper. It happens for the binder too. Now when my binder is not fully fermented, it does leave a bitter taste. This indicates that the binder influences the taste quite a substantial bit, as you would expect.
 
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#11
I believe all the components play an important role. As well as amount and, placement of the components. at times I'll use more then one leaf type for binder. I won't limit any advertised designation to that position. I believe there are almost an endless amount of blend combinations to be had in any given set choice of leaves due to positioning, conditioning, placement priming and vitola.
This is so true. I ran an experiment one rolling session where I alternated binder leaves with the same blend total. For example, with using one seco and one ligero leaf, one cigar would use half of the seco leaf as binder, the next would use half a ligero leaf as binder, but the total was still two leaves. Turned out when I smoked them, I always preferred the ones bound with seco over the ligero bound ones.
 
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