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Whole Leaf Tobacco

Little bit of mold

crowdawg

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#1
I left my cigar leaves with too much humidity for a couple days and notice just a tiny bit of mold. 2-3 spots on a few leaves. Specifically my binder and wrapper. Can I just wipe it off and still use the leaves just fine?
 
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#2
Yeah, if you can't taste it, or can't hardly taste it, and you're smoking it rather than eating it, no worries. Don't let the Lysol and bleach generation make you afraid of it.
 

ras_oscar

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#4
Try to identify why the mold has formed and eliminate the conditions to prevent reoccurrence. The easiest way is usually to reduce moisture. I have a 1 gallon ziplock bag I use to store wrapper scraps. After a rolling session, I lay the contents of the entire bag on my rolling table and visually examine it, discarding and portions that have signs of mold. I then spread it out on the rolling board and leave it for a few days. I return it to the bag and give it one squirt of DW before sealing it up. Also, after I have finished a rolling session and returned unused binder, filler and wrapper to its delivery bag, I hang the casing bags upside down and open them to allow air circulation, eliminate residual moisture and greatly reduce the likelihood of mold spores establishing a beachhead in the bag. My kins tell me my rolling station looks like Dexter's kill room. :)
 

deluxestogie

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#5
I agree. Mold spores are everywhere. They're everywhere already. You control it by regulating the moisture. Tobacco molds less easily than bread, and maybe about as easily as cheddar cheese. Tobacco that is stored dry but pliable usually won't mold.

Stems are more hygroscopic than lamina, so they tend to mold more easily. I never worry about using leaf with a moldy stem. I just rip out the icky stem, and use the leaf. Scant mold on the leaf is, like MarcL has stated, inconsequential. If a stemmed leaf smells moldy, I always toss it.

Since everybody's storage and usage environment is different, you just have to experiment. My usual goal is to store leaf or leaf scraps as dry as possible while still being flexible.

Bob
 
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