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Whole Leaf Tobacco

Making Latakia at Home

Smokin Harley

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#41
Bob. as I read through all 3 parts and took most of it in being a former horticulture student ( with an Associates degree !)the only thing I have to wonder about is the use of the galvanized can...I was always taught by way of experienced welders and smokers of meat anyway that galvanized metal should never be used for smoking (food) because of the zinc content which can cause a very bad gastronomic "experience" . or am I confusing the effects of welding of galvanized metal which is the actual burning off of the zinc with simple heating of the galvanized vessel?
 

deluxestogie

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#42
That's a good question to raise about the galvanized surface.

The interior of the can doesn't really come into more than occasional, momentary contact with the tobacco. Also, the galvanized surface is quickly coated with pyrolytic resins from the smoke. That is, the interior of the can gets as black as the inside of any chimney from pine smoke. So I believe the net mass transfer is onto the surface.

Besides, the galvanized trash can is the holy grail of cheap and simple.

Bob
 

Brown Thumb

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#43
I would think to bring the can up to a way higher temp. To burn off any unwanted thingies in there. Before use with Baccy.
like we do with the kilns we build.
 

Smokin Harley

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#44
Bob, I have a Brinkman smoker too so I will most likely follow with that design. Heres the smokers history...It was gifted to me by my in laws , FIL cant eat smoked foods , makes him sick almost instantly. personally I think its the store bought stuff with way too many preservatives and chemical shit storms they put in the recipes for long term storage. Anyway, they tried to make stuff in it and out of 20 attempts only had one good meal out of it . So i ended up with it . It was a charcoal smoker...only I did a little electrical conversion kit of my own. Theres a local second hand store we like to go to . I found a small portable table top electric grill ,cant recall the brand . It had the electric heat element similar to the old electric charcoal starters. it also has a stainless steel drip pan. the rest was plastic and a grille top of course. the plastic was discarded and the element sits atop the grille with a little help by a block of wood under the control switch housing to keep it from tipping. I took an old cookie tin and "japaned" it for my wood chip pan,for those who dont know what that is , slow heating to the point the paint is burnt off and the tin is down to bare metal. the whole deal fits under the brinkman smoker right between two of the three feet. . I made a wind break from a piece of cardboard and this set up smokes chickens like you wouldnt believe.
Heres another idea - I've seen people convert old office file cabinets into smokers . the 2 drawers are ok for meat on a shelf or grate type rack, 4 drawer ones are nice for hanging stuff like 1 lb salami or sausage . Cover with some foam and its a nice smoke box. Bottom drawer is your fire box and the rest are smoking levels. Now, my wifes uncle is an electrician , he happens upon things all the time...I have an idea to convert one of those electrical boxes you see near traffic lights .stainless steel , two doors side by side for indirect heat or cold smoking or direct heat for hot smoking depending on damping the sides to one another, its vented and its already got the knockout on top that Id use for the damper and chimney...all Id need is a bigger heat element.
 

Knucklehead

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#45
I know we were taught not to breathe the fumes when welding galvanized steel. Respirators under the welding helmet. However, I don't think the temps get high enough in smoking leaf to generate the toxic fumes like welding would.
 
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#46
I know we were taught not to breathe the fumes when welding galvanized steel. Respirators under the welding helmet. However, I don't think the temps get high enough in smoking leaf to generate the toxic fumes like welding would.
The melting point of zinc is 787F, and the boiling point is 1665F. This isn't a clear predictor of the temperature at which it burns, but I think it's safe to say that so long as the heat source is not in direct contact with the zinc, there will be little interaction between it, and the tobacco.
 
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