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Whole Leaf Tobacco

Nicotine exposure from rolling?

mwaller

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#1
I'm interested in trying my hand at growing, curing, and rolling my own cigars. Do I have to be concerned about nicotine exposure when rolling cigars? I only smoke cigars on occasion, and strong sticks can make me feel quite sick. Thoughts?
Mwaller
 

SmokesAhoy

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#3
If tolerance is very low you probably will feel something at least from handling the moistened wrapper leaf, doubt you'd get sick though.
 

Ben Brand

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#6
I get my wrappers very wet before wrapping and spray water on my rolling granite, basically sticking the leaf on the granite. I do get a very slight nicotine buzz sometimes, a slight headache.
 

Smokin Harley

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#8
I'm interested in trying my hand at growing, curing, and rolling my own cigars. Do I have to be concerned about nicotine exposure when rolling cigars? I only smoke cigars on occasion, and strong sticks can make me feel quite sick. Thoughts?
Mwaller
concern, maybe. I have found while harvesting all day I get a little buzz .And at times when I've been rolling a while. My hands at that point are brownish black and very sticky.
 

Floppy2

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#9
I have a friend of mine who warned me, as I was topping my rustica this summer to wash my hands afterward. She is a geneticist/biologist and said that if I was not a regular smoker that the nicotine could make me feel strange in low doses. I took her advice and, as I was harvesting leaves I made sure to wash my hands and not to handle the leaves if I had cuts or scratches.

I also make natural dyes from plants to color raw wool for spinning and do the same thing. Some of the plants are a low level poison so I do take care.

Barb R.
 

squeezyjohn

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#11
I don't think that the effect is as large as some people suggest. The amount of free nicotine available in even quite wet wrapper or green leaf is only a small percentage of the nicotine you would get by smoking it - and the skin is not the best way to absorb chemicals (as anyone who ever used a nicotine patch will tell you!). I've picked whole patches of tobacco and ended up with hands covered in sticky residue and still not really felt a thing from it.
 

Floppy2

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#12
Sounds to me like it effects each person differently and if you are not used to nicotine, then you may be effected. Also, as I now understand, certain tobaccos have more nicotine so that sounds like it may make a difference. Those of you who smoke a lot and grow, process and handle the tobacco all the time may not feel anything at all. Each one of us is unique in this area. Just like alcohol. Some can drink till the cows come home and some can have half a shot and are out on the couch.

Do what is best for you.

bjr
 

Tutu

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#14
I do not smoke, only the occasional cigar on a Friday night, and have worked in harvesting green leafs in Brazil. You can definitely absorb nicotine through your skin and you will notice it after picking a full morning, but not from rolling a cigar. That is, I highly doubt anyone ever will. Regardless of whether you smoke and are used to nicotine or not.
 

juan carlos

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#16
i roll 18 at a time. my hands are brown and sticky when done, i can feel it. it's actually just a nice dose. i can't puff anything more than seco with a small strip of ligaro or maybe a half leaf of viso, or it will turn me green.
 

OldDinosaurWesH

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#17
When I harvest and string my tobacco leaf, my hands get black and sticky with the juice and dust. I rarely have noticed any nicotine sensation. Although, I did read a piece when I was doing tobacco research some time back. The article stated that the school kids that they used to hand harvest tobacco would become nauseous and pass out. Presumably from nicotine exposure. The solution for the problem was to use gloves. If you don't want the nicotine exposure from handling tobacco, use disposable gloves. A cheap and easy solution.

Wes H.
 

deluxestogie

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#18
When Green Tobacco Sickness was first published in the medical literature, back in the 1980s, it was with regard to adult tobacco pickers going out to pick early in the morning, while there was still dew on the leaves. The route of absorption seemed to be primarily from bare forearms (which have thinner skin than the palms of the hands) brushing against the wet leaves, as the workers passed between the rows of plants.

Bob
 

davek14

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#20
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Tobacco_Sickness

I used to work in Kentucky and knew many folks who grew commercially or helped growers harvest for hire. Tobacco farming used to be a very common sideline. Tobacco bases were cut some years ago.

Green tobacco sickness was apparently pretty common. People would say that it helped if you did smoke or chew (more common) since you would be used to the nicotine.

Still, that was hot, sweaty, all day work with green, uncured tobacco.
 
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