• Dear Guest,

    We've been using a forum format called vBulletin for over seven years and the program is no longer being developed, so that means no more updates or security patches. vBulletin has never been compatible with search engine optimization and it does not support the multitude of various devices most people use to access the internet, so it's time to say goodbye to vBulletin.

    For these reasons we have moved our forum to a new format that will support and encourage growth for the next generation of grower and DIY tobacco users.

    So please post any issues you're having with using the new site.

    As usual, you may login with your old password.

Whole Leaf Tobacco

OldDinosar's 2018 Grow blog

OldDinosaurWesH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
866
Likes
162
Points
43
Location
Dayton Wa.
More curing photos.

I now have 14 strings of initial color cured leaf that I have set out into the main basement for dry down.

Tobacco seedlings 9-23-18 new crop colored down & hung to dry out.jpg Tobacco seedlings 9-23-18 new crop colored down & hung to dry out 2.jpg

This is a temporary situation 'till the fat stems dry out. Then I will hang the strings from the ceiling two or three strings at a time vertically to save space.

Wes H.
 

OldDinosaurWesH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
866
Likes
162
Points
43
Location
Dayton Wa.
My Swarr-Hibshman cigar tobacco is starting to color down on the plant. This makes me hopeful that I might be able to actually color this stuff down and eventually use it. The Piloto Cubano and Corojo 99 are still very green. I guess that I'll let them stay "on the hoof" till frost is eminent.

Tobacco seedlings 9-29-18 swarr coloring down.jpg Tobacco seedlings 9-29-18 swarr coloring down 1.jpg Tobacco seedlings 9-29-18 swarr coloring down 2.jpg

Wes H.
 

OldDinosaurWesH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
866
Likes
162
Points
43
Location
Dayton Wa.
These are the last photos of my tobacco garden before I started taking off tops today. Photos taken Saturday 9-29-18

Tobacco seedlings 9-29-18 west garden.jpg Tobacco seedlings 9-29-18 east garden.jpg Tobacco seedlings 9-29-18 GL 939.jpg

Photo one, west garden. Photo two, east garden. Photo three, Gold Leaf 939 patch (31 plants).
 

OldDinosaurWesH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
866
Likes
162
Points
43
Location
Dayton Wa.
Photos taken today after starting to take off tops this morning.

Tobacco seedlings 10-01-18 8+' terno.jpg Tobacco seedlings 10-01-18 10' Piloto.jpg Tobacco seedlings 10-01-18 harvest debris.jpg

Photo one, tallest Ternopolskii 7 a little over 8 feet. 8 foot long 2" x 2" board is being used for height comparison.

Photo two, tallest plant Piloto Cubano, using the same 8 foot board as a measuring stick, about 10 feet at the crows foot.

Photo three, debris left over after trimming and hanging Ternoploskii 7. This goes in the trash. I would have trimmed these off some time ago but they were too high to reach on my little step ladder.

Wes H.
 

OldDinosaurWesH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
866
Likes
162
Points
43
Location
Dayton Wa.
Oh, I'm just getting started on the hanging. A couple of hours per day, and I'll have it in a week or so. I just kind of plod along, no big rush. The 10 day forecast isn't showing anything below 44 degrees. So I should be good for now. I bagged one of the Ternopolskii's on August 5th, and that individual seed head is just covered with big fat pods. Many of those pods are already dried out, and there aren't any fresh blooms. I guess that seed head had run its course.

I can't explain the Piloto Cubano. Not knowing anything much about this variety, I was surprised. The Corojo 99's aren't nearly this tall, only in the 5 to 6 foot range. But that one Piloto is the grand champion tallest plant I have this year. All of the Piloto's have been pretty tall. Last year one of my Bolivia Criollo Black plants got to 10 & 1/2 feet. But, I already knew that the Bolivia's would get tall.

Meanwhile, I have Ostrolist 316's that are as much as eight feet tall that are just now showing bloom heads. I guess these silly things haven't figured out that it is October first. The seed is from the Ukraine, where they get serious winter. They must produce the seed for this type in a greenhouse. That's the only way I could see that you could get viable seed on such a late bloomer. I was checking my bag tags, and the earliest bloom head on this variety was August 28th.

Adventures in tobacco growing indeed.

Wes H.
 

Charly

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 1, 2016
Messages
1,238
Likes
135
Points
63
Location
France
Yes ! That's a BIG Piloto Cubano !
The biggest I had this year was only about 7 feet high with flowers (the 10 plants were very uniform)
(again, we had drought and I had trouble to water them enough...)
 

OldDinosaurWesH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
866
Likes
162
Points
43
Location
Dayton Wa.
I have a question for Bob or other members about whole-stalk hanging and curing conditions for same.

I whole-stalk hung my Swarr Hibshman plants this year. Half I put in my high-humidity curing area, and half I put in the main basement as an experiment. The high humidity area maintains 70 - 75 % humidity pretty constantly. The main basement hangs in at around 55% humidity. I assumed that the higher humidity environment would be better for color curing. So far this has not been the case. The plants in the lower humidity area of my basement have been coloring down much faster and more completely than the high humidity environment. I can't explain this, but the difference is quite noticeable.

Any ideas or suggestions?

Wes H.
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
12,733
Likes
1,597
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
You didn't mention the temperatures of the two curing spaces.

All of my stalk-curing occurs within an outdoor shed, with all of the ups and downs of temp and humidity. So I'm afraid I can't clarify what you are seeing. Generally, higher humidity during color-curing results in a darker leaf color, so long as it's not so persistently high as to promote mold.

Bob
 

OldDinosaurWesH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
866
Likes
162
Points
43
Location
Dayton Wa.
Slow I can live with. Green flash I don't care for. That is my main concern re: lack of color down.

I thought it was really odd that the lower humidity stalks were color curing faster than the higher humidity ones. Especially given that the temps were comparable. I could add heat to the high humidity room. If you thought that would do any good. My main basement isn't really practical to add heat to. Too many cubes there without costing a fortune for the heat. It's only a modest amount of tobacco after all.

Wes H.
 

OldDinosaurWesH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
866
Likes
162
Points
43
Location
Dayton Wa.
I check on progress every day or two. It has only been nine days and so far so good. I should have some time before mold or green flash set in.

I grew twelve of this type. If I can get all or most of it to color down reasonably well, I should have a fair stock of leaf to play with. Maybe I can even make a few "deluxestogies" with them.

Thanks Bob.

Wes H.
 

Charly

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 1, 2016
Messages
1,238
Likes
135
Points
63
Location
France
Thank you Wes, it's an interesting information about stalk curing !

I have cut half of my TN90 plants for stalk curing and I was wondering if I should put them in a place with less humidity (with equal temperatures) compared to where they are hanging right now !
If your plants color cure faster in low humidity, I will put them in my garage, maybe it will help them.

Maybe stalk curing in high humidity is not recommanded (or necessary) since the plant stalk have still a lot of moisture to give to the leaves.
 

OldDinosaurWesH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
866
Likes
162
Points
43
Location
Dayton Wa.
Charly:

This is my second year stalk curing. I have had good luck in the past doing this, with one exception. I got significant green flash on Costello Negro. Everything else cured up nicely and without any rot. Swarr Hibshman is new to me and I thought as an experiment I would split the individual stalks between the two environments.

I have not had much luck so far this year curing the primed Swarr Hibshman leaf. I mostly got green flash.

I like your idea about the stalks providing moisture to the leaf. Perhaps my high humidity room is having some effect on the stalks that I don't fully understand. Versus the lower humidity area stalks. I guess I'll have to wait and see how this experiment works out. I live in a naturally low humidity area, so humidity control is a pretty big deal.

Good luck with your crop.

Wes H.
 

Charly

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 1, 2016
Messages
1,238
Likes
135
Points
63
Location
France
Where I live is the opposite : too much humid a big part of the year (this summer was exceptionnaly dry and I had some flash dried green leaves).
I have to take care of drying the leaves fast enough and bring them home as soon as possible to avoid mold ... the weather is becoming colder and more and more humid ! It's time to hurry up (for me)
 

OldDinosaurWesH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
866
Likes
162
Points
43
Location
Dayton Wa.
I just observed an interesting phenomenon and I thought I would share.

I'd been digging tobacco stumps out of my garden for disposal when I saw one of the resident squirrels jump up on my chopping block, not six feet away, and give me the eye. This lasted several seconds until the squirrel jumped down off of the wood block and went over to where I'd been digging. The little rascal rummaged around in the dirt and soon came up with an acorn. She promptly dug a fresh hole and buried the nut. It finally dawned on me that my digging had disturbed one of her caches. Miss squirrel had been watching me from the nearby tree and decided to come down out of the tree and correct my nut disturbing activities. The squirrel scampered off, presumably looking for another acorn to bury.

As a post-script to this story, I have several Oak trees as well as the neighbors having Black and English walnut trees. Every year I have a fresh crop of "volunteer" tree seedlings to deal with thanks to the resident squirrels.

Wes H.
 

OldDinosaurWesH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
866
Likes
162
Points
43
Location
Dayton Wa.
Latest photos.

Tobacco seedlings 11-02-18 GL 939.jpg Tobacco seedlings 11-02-18 east garden 1.jpg

Tobacco seedlings 11-02-18 west garden.jpg Tobacco seedlings 11-02-18 swarr.jpg

Photo one, this seasons' G/L 939 patch, stumps dug up & covered with freshly deposited fall foliage.

Photo two, east garden reduced to stumps, & a few seed heads. Who'd have thought it would still be green on November 2, 2018.

Photo three, west garden picked clean.

Photo four, one lonely Swarr Hibshman I left behind (intentionally) looking a little weather and wind beaten. I'll put it out of its' misery this weekend.

We still have no freezing weather in the 10 day forecast. I'm getting significant secondary growth out there. Maybe there will be some worth picking later.

Wes H.
 
Top