• Dear Guest,

    We've been using a forum format called vBulletin for over seven years and the program is no longer being developed, so that means no more updates or security patches. vBulletin has never been compatible with search engine optimization and it does not support the multitude of various devices most people use to access the internet, so it's time to say goodbye to vBulletin.

    For these reasons we have moved our forum to a new format that will support and encourage growth for the next generation of grower and DIY tobacco users.

    So please post any issues you're having with using the new site.

    As usual, you may login with your old password.

Whole Leaf Tobacco

Paraord's grow blog 2018

deluxestogie

Administrator
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
12,733
Likes
1,597
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
You can smoke color-cured leaf. Some varieties aren't bad after a month or two. Most will taste raw and unfinished. But it's safe to smoke.

I would fill that Crockpot with hot tap water, then just check the feel of the leaves once a day. As long as they are somewhat pliable, they will kiln. Using less water just increases the frequency with which you have to add water again. (Don't add cold tap water to a hot, empty Crockpot.)

Bob
 

Paraord

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 8, 2017
Messages
100
Likes
47
Points
28
Location
Western NY
Crockpot is filled with hot water, temp sitting at 119 +- .5 degrees, fan on 1/3 speed. And the lid is just a touch off to the side. And the great experiment continues!

Ill try some of that tobacco I cut just to do it. Its hard to wait any longer seeing as this process has eclipsed 7 months so far! I want to try some results!! Albeit a rough representation of the finished product.
 
Joined
Sep 1, 2014
Messages
3,137
Likes
575
Points
113
Location
Edmonton, AB, CA
They
Crockpot is filled with hot water, temp sitting at 119 +- .5 degrees, fan on 1/3 speed. And the lid is just a touch off to the side. And the great experiment continues!

Ill try some of that tobacco I cut just to do it. Its hard to wait any longer seeing as this process has eclipsed 7 months so far! I want to try some results!! Albeit a rough representation of the finished product.
They say tobacco is a Thirteen month crop, so you're right on schedule.
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
12,733
Likes
1,597
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
a rough representation of the finished product.
More like a misrepresentation.

I am generally quite pleased with the quality of tobacco that I produce...AND...it is usually truly crappy and disappointing when I sample it before it has been kilned and then rested for at least a week after kilning. Sometimes it needs a month or more of rest after kilning, before it shows me what its character has become.

I think your plan for kilning is fine. [see my latest post in my Grow Log for a clarification of my present kilning practice]

Bob
 
Last edited:

OldDinosaurWesH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 31, 2017
Messages
866
Likes
162
Points
43
Location
Dayton Wa.
That's why you kiln tobacco. To drive the excess nitrogen off. I'll guess the tobacco you shredded without kilning will have an ammonia taste. I have tobacco that has been hanging for a year or in some cases more, and they could still use some kilning.

Wes H.
 

Paraord

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 8, 2017
Messages
100
Likes
47
Points
28
Location
Western NY
I don't stave off nothing. Try it as it goes and you learn more. What you learn might be intangible, but, whatever.
Well tonight I tried the color cured/ pre kiln stuff I cut with the Teck 1. The leaves I cut were pretty leathery after sitting in this 90 degree 80 percent humidity for a few months. I mixed up equal parts Tennessee Red Leaf, Indian Black, Little Crittenden, and Yellow Orinco. It was really quite pleasant, tastes of hay and slightly sweet. Reminded me a lot of my last tin of Dunhill Virginia Flake. Well any Virginia really. Which is what I like! Maybe get a little perique in there someday but this seems like a fine mixture for me and a great start into this.
 

Paraord

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 8, 2017
Messages
100
Likes
47
Points
28
Location
Western NY
Man oh man! Almost 2 weeks in and those leaves in the kiln are really nice looking/smelling/feeling. Im thinking about getting another couple rows in there or simply stack them on top of the grates in piles. Any thoughts on that? Here's a couple pictures but without smell-o-vision its lacking the best part.







Mrs. Paraord said tonight "Your room smells amazing, like my Oolong tea." I can live with that! Because I quite enjoy the smell as well (of course).
 

Paraord

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 8, 2017
Messages
100
Likes
47
Points
28
Location
Western NY
Having another pipe of my 4 tobacco blend. Boy is it nice and mild. The jar has a semi sweet scent, smells like raisins actually.

Anyone have thoughts on just piling up leaves on the grates in piles? I have a good bit more ready to enter the kiln.
 

Paraord

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 8, 2017
Messages
100
Likes
47
Points
28
Location
Western NY
Went thru and was pulling leaves off for the piles, lucky me I had 2 bunches with some mold in between the leaves. Chucked the whole cluster that was contaminated, and not really too worried about that level of attrition given the starting quantity. I mean I have plenty. Ill grab a space heater for the room to make sure the top stays a little hotter. Maybe for next year Ill get into the Attic and set it up for drying with paracord lines throughout. Ill have to get a drop down ladder thing. And I have to get some red bricks for the hearth I am planning on building. I think Ill head to Lowes......

I did get a pile of Tennessee Red Leaf on the top grate, and Little Crittenden on the bottom.
 

Paraord

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 8, 2017
Messages
100
Likes
47
Points
28
Location
Western NY
Well, we are creeping up to the end of 4 weeks in the kiln. What now? The next batch is ready to go in, and I put in a batch a week ago. I know I am supposed to let them rest somehow but I think I need to explore more on post kilning and long term storage. I am pretty partial to those half gallon Ball jars as I have a good stock of them. I would imagine prior to long term storing it would be advantageous to destem them in order to minimize moisture for mold? I know I have some research ahead of me, better get to it!
 
Top