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Whole Leaf Tobacco

Paraord's grow blog 2018

Paraord

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Ok so there was one day left for the 4 week mark yesterday and I wanted to check out some tobacco. Should it be darker? Or is it just luck of the draw. I could leave it in longer if that will have a benefit.

Top from left to right (Little Crittenden, Tennessee Red Leaf, Indian Black)
Bottom from left to right (Yellow Orinco, Yellow Twist Bud, Tennessee Red leaf)


Its gotten a touch darker while resting but not much. This picture was like straight out of the gate from the kiln.

My longer term storage thought was destem and vacuum pack in those food saver bags after letting them rest for a few days post kiln. Thoughts on that?
 
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They would be darker if the kiln had higher temperature and humidity. Lower humidity requires longer kilning in my experience. I've been trying different parameters from my normal 124° x 80% this summer. Right now, the tobacco is in smokable (non-moldable) case @118°. I'm three months in with some Piloto and it's starting to smell like I had hoped it would. The color has hit Colorado. Higher temps and humidity would likely have made it Maduro in a month.
 

deluxestogie

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While temp and humidity can influence the final leaf color, the primary determinants are the variety and the priming level. My kiln batches, for years, have been of mixed varieties and mixed priming levels. The lower leaf always comes out lighter and thinner than the upper leaf, under identical conditions. I have kilned tied hands of stalk-cured leaf--each hand typically containing all the leaf from two entire plants. When the tied hand come out of the kiln, the lower-stalk leaf is often a light claro, while the upper-stalk leaf is a maduro or even oscuro. Priming level and variety.

One aspect of kilning for lower vs higher primings that I've noticed is that leaving lower leaves in the kiln for 6+ weeks makes no difference, compared to 4 weeks, whereas leaving upper leaves in the kiln for 6+ weeks tends to shorten the subsequent rest and aging required for it to rate as excellent.

If you use FoodSaver bags, I would suggest not sealing the bag. Just roll the top, and hold it closed with a wooden clothespin.

Bob
 
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