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Whole Leaf Tobacco

Perique: The Native Crop

deluxestogie

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#24
After thinking about the Perique process for several years, I have finally decided to develop a method that does not require a massive press or large quantities of tobacco. It does not involve a trash can, but uses a 4" ID Lexan canister from Walmart, and could easily make a 3 year supply for 1 person in a single batch.

It needs about 40-50 psi continuous. With a 4" diameter:

Πr[sup]2[/sup] = 4Π = ~12.5 in[sup]2[/sup]

12.5 x 40# = 500# to the piston (an HDPE 4" follower for a cheese press)

That's too much for my wall-mounted lever arm press, which can do about 120# before it starts to pull out of the kitchen wall.

So I would need a large C-clamp or lever press that can do 500#. I think the Lexan can stand up to 40 psi everywhere. I've never fussed with a giant C-clamp, so I'm not sure if the handle can generate enough torque to do that. (Maybe add a breaker bar.)

Since I'm not growing Perique this season, I'll probably use Harrow Velvet. (Don's fabulous Perique processed leaf used--if I recall--Brownleaf. I think Larry may have used the Perique variety to make his excellent Perique.)

Once I've worked up the simple contraption, I'll write it up in a separate thread. I'm off to the skunkworks.

Bob
 

BigBonner

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#25
The problem that messed me up was the hot temperature . I made a whiskey barrel full and made my own press with two hi lift jacks .
I pressed them and a few days later I aired them out then put it all back in . It looked and smelled really good .I was using my big tobacco barn for this contraption and I could easily move it around with the fork lifts on my tractor .When it came time for needing my barn to put the years crop in , I moved it to a hay barn of mine and the temperature was hot . The weather was over 105 Degrees .I noticed the fermentation was way different than when it was in my big cooler barn .It formed a head crust two inches thick on top and began to smelling really bad , soured . Before I moved the barrel it would ferment just like beer and the smell was good .
So my advice is to keep the temperature around 75 to 80 degrees .
 

BarG

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#26
These "How to" forums directed toward home growers will likely be responsible for the introduction of new types of perique processed tobacco. The new understanding of the multitude of heirloom varieties will undoubtedly lead to creations like Perique processed Samsun 15 or any of the other types with highly distinctive characteristics. While Perique production might end some day, these boards and others like them will preserve the knowledge of process.

I sure wish I would have saved the video about the Martin farm. The entire process was documented in detail. Endless searches have yielded no returns. Maybe it was too informative, whatever the reason...it's gone.
I'm home growing about 70 perique this year. The info when you guys first started disscussing perique got me real intrigued about it. Perique? The more I learned the more I was intrigued!!
 

deluxestogie

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#27
Larry, good point. I've never thought about the ambient temperature for pressure curing. In St. James Parish, Louisiana, the average mean daily temperature is between ~51 to ~82ºF, and stays below 70ºF October through April. So I think you've hit the nail on the head.

http://www.usa.com/school-district-2201500-weather.htm

Have you allowed the over-fermented Perique to air-out? It should smell like a cross between prunes and manure.

Bob
 

BarG

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#28
.It formed a head crust two inches thick on top and began to smelling really bad , soured . Before I moved the barrel it would ferment just like beer and the smell was good .
So my advice is to keep the temperature around 75 to 80 degrees .
Dedecated!:cool:
 

BigBonner

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#29
Bob

It is still sitting in the barrel . I have been tempted to open it up . It does smell like manure on top . I just wonder if it is like that all the way through or if the bottom may be different ..
 

Fisherman

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#30
The one video where the people opened the 10 year old barrel. I dont know if you can hear the people comment or not about smell. A few really bent down and stuck their whole faces into the barrel so I would assume that the smell wasnt real strong.
 

BarG

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#31
Bob

It is still sitting in the barrel . I have been tempted to open it up . It does smell like manure on top . I just wonder if it is like that all the way through or if the bottom may be different ..
You might be a REDNECK if?

Your not sure if one of your barrels thats been sealed for years might explode when opened.;)
 

Fisherman

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#32
Ever smell KimChee? Not the spelling but is smells like crap warmed over and is made of chinese cabbage basically. Is fermented in ground in a crock pot. Sauerkraut is also cabbage fermented without a piece of the cabbage being allowed to touch the air. Would this be that other than anerobic fermentation?
ANOTHER THOUGHT....... MANURE TEA............ dam caps./............. when done correct is not supposed to stink. but if not done right [ critics say use an air stone from fish tank] .......... that it will stink worse than it's first ingredient...................
 

Fisherman

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#35
I am to dam dum to figure out what needs to be grown and if it don't have a catchy name or come recommended, I would pass it up most likely but would help grow some out.
 

BarG

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#39
Thanks guys. I want to play with it later using yall's methods. I am going to add the white oak charred to the equation. If it would matter?
 
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#40
Now I wonder if someone would try a "mini" version of this process with like a 5 gallon bucket and duplicate the lever system and possibly see if the addition of molasses which was grown by the original growers and sometimes suspected of being added to set off the fermintation process also. I will later if I succeed in growing any
I've read that as well. When I can figure out how to find BigBonner (Larry - I've gathered from reading on here) and buy some seed/lings; I will grow some white burley on a patch of ground that I've already put composted molasses and dried molasses. I don't know if that will help the fermentation process or speed of of it but it's worth a try. Sure will be a lot of activity below ground surface though! ;)
 
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