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Whole Leaf Tobacco

Really Easy Perique Press

greenmonster714

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Question? Probably a dumb one but its crossed my mind. You say the tobacco produces the yeast. Has anyone ever used any form of sugar to expediate the process or would that just gum things up?
 

Jitterbugdude

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Question? Probably a dumb one but its crossed my mind. You say the tobacco produces the yeast. Has anyone ever used any form of sugar to expediate the process or would that just gum things up?
You do not want to add sugar if you want to make "normal" Perique. Historically Perique has always made with low sugar leaf such as found in Burleys. I made some Perique using flue cured Lemon. It came out as a rather zesty twangy tobacco. But as with most things tobacco many of the things we do are because of tradition. I'd suggest making a regular batch of Perique and if it comes out to your satisfaction try another with some sugar added.
 

deluxestogie

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It says here that ideal growth temperature for Pichia anomala is 37C. http://wineserver.ucdavis.edu/industry/enology/winemicro/wineyeast/pichia_anomala.html
Have you ever noticed a difference in the results from varying temperatures?

This site cultures it aerobically at 24-26C https://www.atcc.org/Products/All/96603.aspx
My sense, only from anecdotal evidence, is that warmer temps favor the growth of coliform bacteria (stinky, potty smell), and that in the mixed culture environment of a Perique batch, moderately cool temps (fall-winter-spring average temps in St. James Parish) favor Pichia anomala.



The ATCC article you cite mentions "killer toxin." That sounds bad. But it's not.

Ingeniis et al.: Pichia anomala...Appl Environ Microbiol. 2009 Feb; 75(4): 1129–1134. said:
...all known killer toxins...kill sensitive cells via a two-step mode of action. During the first step, the killer toxin binds a receptor site on the cell wall of its sensitive target.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2643562/
Only plant and fungal cells (yeast, mold) have a cell wall. In addition, they have a cell membrane. Animal cells have only a cell membrane.

Marquina et al.: Biology of Killer Yeasts. Int Microbiol(2002) 5: 65–71 said:
...killer toxins lethal to susceptible yeast strains. These toxins have no activity against microorganisms other than yeasts

http://revistes.iec.cat/index.php/IM/article/viewFile/9357/9353
It's also worth mentioning that "killer toxins" are present only in particular strains of Pichia anomala. And in those, the production of "killer toxin" varies considerably.

Summary:
  • Cooler indoor temperatures seem to be ideal for Perique making.
  • "killer toxin" only kills yeasts and molds. It won't kill you!
Bob
 

DistillingJim

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Your summary is consistent with what one finds when fermenting alcoholic beverages. Too cold and the yeast slows right down but still does what you want. Too hot and goes fast but starts creating funky esthers and off flavours. It seems a similar science is at play here.
 

greenmonster714

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You do not want to add sugar if you want to make "normal" Perique. Historically Perique has always made with low sugar leaf such as found in Burleys. I made some Perique using flue cured Lemon. It came out as a rather zesty twangy tobacco. But as with most things tobacco many of the things we do are because of tradition. I'd suggest making a regular batch of Perique and if it comes out to your satisfaction try another with some sugar added.
Interesting. Zesty n twangy...is twangy even a word? lol. So the tobacco with the higher sugar content finished a bit different. With the talk of natural yeast n all that I just thought maybe a raw sugar or even a dehydrated fruit high in natural sugars like rasins, apple, or maybe even pineapple would produce something a little different or if it would just screw everything up. Of course if I get to try the old method I will not veer from the normal procedure but an experiement would be interesting on the second go round if all goes well with the first batch. Thanks for the reply JB.
 

mwaller

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Thanks to guidance and encouragement from many in this forum, I've decided to take a chance on homemade perique. My goal is to create a potent blending component to spice up mild pipe blends. I only grew cigar tobaccos this year, so my choices were a bit unconventional. My Havana 142 was so thin and crispy that it literally turned to dust in my hands. I decided instead to use Florida Sumatra ligero... Here are the first steps in process... IMG_20170917_163645477.jpg
 

OldDinosaurWesH

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I cook, that's why I asked. If you could see my girth, you'd know I like to cook. I make a really tasty loaf of whole wheat bread. I use locally produced Dark Northern Spring wheat. Mmm. My recipe book is copyrighted 1938, and has some good old-fashioned dishes. I also make a pretty tasty meat loaf. It took a few tries to get it right, but my brother practically demands that I make it. For the last two thanksgivings we have had Meat Loaf, Mashed Potatoes and gravy and green beans. With my special seasonings in the meat loaf. Mmm. I generally restrict my science experiments to the kitchen. (No, not that old joke about the mold in the fridge science experiment.) I like to tinker with spices as ingredients. I have some chili peppers you have to be really careful with!

If I hear a loud boom coming over the mountains I'll know it was you. Just kidding! Good luck with the Perique.

Wes H.
 

mwaller

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So, I clearly need to find a more rigid plug to compress the tobacco. I'm currently using an inverted lid from a pickle jar, and that does not stay flat under load... IMG_20170917_205108983.jpg
 

deluxestogie

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In the way of purchasing a follower, those used for cheese press molds are ideal--IF you can locate the proper diameter, and can find the follower without having to also pay for the mold.

One source for 3-7/8": http://www.thecheesemaker.com/produ...MI18bttPOu1gIVxx6GCh2MCQYeEAQYAiABEgKEU_D_BwE

Although you can carve your own, using untreated wood, you might also check a craft supplies shop for pre-cut wood discs.

I have inquired with cheesemaking.com about a possible source for followers, and will post their reply when I receive it.

Bob
 

mwaller

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A few comments on my process (and I'm hoping those who are more experienced will chime in to correct any blunders!)
- I couldn't find a spray bottle, so I decided to hydrate my leaves under warm tap water. This allowed me to rinse off any remaining bugs and dirt.
- While I removed the first few stems using a kitchen knife, I quickly found that a pair of scissors were much more effective. These particular leaves were naturally folded along the mid rib, so it was quick and easy to remove the stem with single cut - like removing the spine of a book.
Unlike most of my other varietals, these Florida Sumatra tips already had a pleasant, vaguely tobacco-like scent to them after color curing. I'm hoping this translates to a perique with smooth, round flavor. I'm not sure whether this will be a Christmas present to myself or lump of coal in my stocking...

Thanks to guidance and encouragement from many in this forum, I've decided to take a chance on homemade perique. My goal is to create a potent blending component to spice up mild pipe blends. I only grew cigar tobaccos this year, so my choices were a bit unconventional. My Havana 142 was so thin and crispy that it literally turned to dust in my hands. I decided instead to use Florida Sumatra ligero... Here are the first steps in process... View attachment 22004
 

deluxestogie

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You do lose a bit of nicotine when you wash brown leaves, but it probably won't matter much, unless you soak them before rinsing.

I'll be curious to hear how the FL Sumatra Perique turns out.

Bob
 

OldDinosaurWesH

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I use scissors too. Following the natural fold like you do. I brush my tobacco with a "bench brush" before I stem and shred it to get rid of dirt and debris. A time consuming but useful practice.

Sounds like we are thinking in a similar mode. Good luck with the Perique.

Wes H.
 

deluxestogie

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The folks at cheesemaking.com tell me that they know of no source for cheese mold followers alone.

If you have the tools to cut a follower of oak, then you might alternatively consider purchasing an inexpensive, thick polypropylene cutting board (definitely food safe), and cutting a piece (or a stack of pieces) from that to fit your Perique container perfectly. Probably just a saber saw and a rasp would do the job.

Bob
 
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