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Whole Leaf Tobacco

Tobacco strain selection guide for minimal processing

SmokesAhoy

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#1
Every once in a while I see a post where someone remarks that their tobacco was really good smoking after only a few weeks hanging, and i know when i talk about the subject most people are turned off by the aging or processing requirements to get a nice smooth smoke. If we compiled a list of strains that do not require extensive aging, kilning etc I think we might be on to a new segment of the market.

What strains have you grown that were great right out of the field? 2 weeks hanging? 4 weeks?

I think a lot of people on the fence regarding this hobby might only be undecided due to the processing. Lets build a list of plants that don't need anything more to be a great smoke than 2-4 weeks hanging.
 

FmGrowit

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#2
I've been saying this for a long time, but I'll say it again. Some people disagree, but I think it's because they are trying to maximize harvest weight therefore sacrificing quality.

Yellow Twist Bud is one of my favorite field cured smokes. The lugs can be smoked right of the stalk. Priming YTB before it is ripe will yield one of the best cigarette tobaccos money can buy. The higher stalk positions are stronger, but can be blended or kilned for cigar filler.

Bursa is another no aging required tobacco. It's an Oriental that can be stalk cured. Once it's cured and dried, it can be smoked.

I've noticed the same thing with Ottoman, but it has much less "Oriental" flavor characteristics than Bursa. In my opinion, Ottoman can be a stand alone cigarette tobacco.

White Flower is a great tobacco that can satisfy the cheap cigar smokers. Field cured lugs proved to be smooth, full flavored strong tobacco taste with a touch of sweetness without aging.
 

Jitterbugdude

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#3
I've been saying this for a long time, but I'll say it again. Some people disagree, but I think it's because they are trying to maximize harvest weight therefore sacrificing quality.
I believe this to be 100% true. The bottom line for a farmer is money. Tobacco is sold by weight. Burley harvested at 4-5 weeks is heavier than Burley harvested at 3 weeks. When you are growing acres of it, the weight difference really adds up. This does not mean harvesting at 5 weeks makes the best tasting tobacco, it means it makes the heaviest yielding tobacco instead.

If you want a smooth quick smoke right after harvest. Try this: Harvest some leaf at 1 week after topping, then 2 weeks etc. Once a plant is topped all kind of things happen, nicotine levels increase, nitrogen, potassium etc increase too. I harvested a large amount of my tobacco this year 10 days after topping. That was on the 13th of July and it is all mostly cured. I've been smoking a lot of it and it is very smooth and tasty. Over the winter I will reevaluate my grow from this year and make some changes. One of those changes might very well be harvesting 1 week after topping. I will wait till next spring to decide.
 

BarG

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#4
I think the perique is a great standalone variety that can be smoked as soon as it is cured as a cigar filler and cigarette mix without kilning for the lugs.
 

Chicken

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#5
i think that un-aged or uncured bacca,,, is very strong and extrememly harsh,

it's like liquor, it gets better with age,
 

Aaron

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#6
I think the perique is a great standalone variety that can be smoked as soon as it is cured as a cigar filler and cigarette mix without kilning for the lugs.
I'll have to give some a try this evening. Out of all the varieties I grew this year the Perique has given me the most trouble color curing.
 

Aaron

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#7
Well, I tried a leaf of my perique and it was tasty. I picked it about 8 weeks ago. The first half of the pipe was smooth with no bite and nice flavor. The second half did start to taste a bit raw but it wasn't overpowering. I wouldn't have guessed it would be that good already. I was not planning on growing any next year because of my troubles curing but I may have to rethink that. The plant did grow nicely for me. :) Thanks BarG.
 

FmGrowit

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#8
There are a couple of "Perique" seeds floating around. Which one did you grow...the one from GRIN or from Seedman? I've grown both and have found the one from seedman to be quite unruly in growing habits. The one from grin was a little more cooperative, but produced small leaves with wide spacing between leaves.
 

Aaron

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#9
Mine were seedlings from BigBonner. I didn't think to ask him where he acquired his seed from. Here's a picture of one of them I grew if it helps.

8192393285_890646e258_z.jpg
 

Markw

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#13
I believe this to be 100% true. The bottom line for a farmer is money. Tobacco is sold by weight. Burley harvested at 4-5 weeks is heavier than Burley harvested at 3 weeks. When you are growing acres of it, the weight difference really adds up. This does not mean harvesting at 5 weeks makes the best tasting tobacco, it means it makes the heaviest yielding tobacco instead.

If you want a smooth quick smoke right after harvest. Try this: Harvest some leaf at 1 week after topping, then 2 weeks etc. Once a plant is topped all kind of things happen, nicotine levels increase, nitrogen, potassium etc increase too. I harvested a large amount of my tobacco this year 10 days after topping. That was on the 13th of July and it is all mostly cured. I've been smoking a lot of it and it is very smooth and tasty. Over the winter I will reevaluate my grow from this year and make some changes. One of those changes might very well be harvesting 1 week after topping. I will wait till next spring to decide.
Thanks for posting this JBD. As this was my first year I had no idea when to pick my leaves. I was waiting for them to yellow up but due to the weather it took ages so I had to start picking at some point. What I found was the leaves that I picked and color cured and then dried fairly quickly are still faily harsh. The leaves that I hung up the dry in the garage took ages to dry are not harsh at all. I don't think they will even need to go in the kiln. If I could pick them earlier that would help loads.Some of the leaves nearly took 7 weeks to dry and I still had to finish drying the rib in a far hotter area

Markw
 

oceansgreen

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#14
i simply must subscribe to this thread, simplicity is probably the only thing that will keep the smokers in my family growing their own baccy after i move away, and the healthier the baccy i can have them smoking the better i feel, that commercial junk is straight up terrible health and quality-wise
 

Chris A

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#15
For cigar filler, is White Flower the only / best choice? This will be my first attempt at growing and I will be growing just a few plants. Don't think I want to attempt a kiln in year one.

Thanks for any advice.

Chris
 

johnlee1933

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#16
For cigar filler, is White Flower the only / best choice? This will be my first attempt at growing and I will be growing just a few plants. Don't think I want to attempt a kiln in year one. Thanks for any advice. Chris
My goodness no! Just about every guy I know has his own favorite filler. Some swear by a bled of two or three. My current favorite is Havana 142. -- John
 

SmokesAhoy

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#17
There are thousands of types, this thread is just exploring a few we have found that are good after a few months hanging, and don't need to be kilned. So experiment and if you grow a type that is pleasant in short order without doing much work on it, post it here:)
 

Knucklehead

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#18
For cigar filler, is White Flower the only / best choice? This will be my first attempt at growing and I will be growing just a few plants. Don't think I want to attempt a kiln in year one.

Thanks for any advice.

Chris
Of those listed so far I think Yellow Twist Bud and Perique would be good cigar fillers. I'm not sure about the Ottoman or Bursa. Maybe someone with more experience can weigh in on those.
 

Chris A

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#19
Just so I'm clear, the Havana 142 does not need to be kilned, just hung & air dryed?

Sorry, but you can see I'm very new to this.
 

Knucklehead

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#20
No tobacco plant needs to be kilned. It can be naturally aged for about a year to remove the harshness and give a better tobacco taste. Using a kiln reduces the age time to about a month by accelerating the aging process. This thread lists those plants that smoke well after curing but with very little or no natural aging or accelerated aging by the kiln. As you can see from the responses there are a very limited number of varieties that taste good right out of the curing stage. Of the other varieties you can naturally age for a year, or kiln for one month. I plan on growing two years worth my first year growing and buying Don or Larrys' whole leaf for this year while mine ages. Next year I will grow one years worth of tobacco and put it in rotation with my aged tobacco. From then on I will always have naturally aged tobacco to smoke. You can be patient, have a plan and not need a kiln. Or you can fail to plan ahead, be lazy, wait to the last minute, have no patience, etc. and you will need a kiln. It all depends on who you are as a person. Kilning is not a preference as much as it is a lifestyle.


ROFLMAO -- sorry, Kiln Guys, I just couldn't resist. Oh, I wish I could see the looks on your faces!!! That's funny I don't care who you are. fencing.gif
 
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