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Whole Leaf Tobacco

When to smoke

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#1
I've just started to roll and was needing advise as to when I could smoke them. I have seen that you need to rest them and what is this about ammonia.
 

deluxestogie

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#2
What is it that you are "rolling"? Cigarettes or cigars? Also, what is the source of the tobacco? Is it air-cured, kilned, purchased?

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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#8
If you roll it with filler in low case, binder in medium case, and only the wrapper in high case, you can smoke it immediately. Allowing it to rest for a magical period of time will alter the feel a lot, and the aroma some.

My thinking is that a beginning roller needs the feedback of "roll one; smoke one," in order to improve his or her skill at achieving a proper draw, and a cigar that doesn't fall apart. Once you're able to reliably create a smokable cigar, then you can indulge yourself in the nuances of various periods of rest prior to smoking.

I've rolled between 10 and 20 thousand cigars, smoke 4 or 5 a day, and nearly always smoke each cigar immediately after rolling it. [Some members consider this a crude approach to a fine art.]

So, those are my thoughts. Post a pic of your first cigar.

Bob
 

Matty

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#11
The ashes look like it burns well. Couldn't have been too wet. Cigars can be rolled and smoked immediately, the only thing that would compromise that is if it were too wet to burn right. I used to roll and smoke all the time but now that I've got a grasp on blending and rolling I make batches of 10-12 and put them away for later. If a fresh cigar is too wet to smoke after rolling just leave it out in the open awhile to dry out some.
 

Knucklehead

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#14
Aussie just a heads up to avoid hard feelings in the future, Don (FmGrowit) owns this forum and also www.wholeleaftobacco.com. The place you posted is his direct competitor. I know you're a noob and didn't realize it cause I didn't when I first joined. I'm not getting on you or trying to be a smart aleck, just trying to let you know the lay of the land.
 

webmost

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#15
I've just started to roll and was needing advise as to when I could smoke them. I have seen that you need to rest them and what is this about ammonia.

Ammonia is the diaper pail smell you get when damp cigar leaf ferments. It gives you headache if you smoke it. Ammonia takes a few days to develop. So if you smoke them right off the table (the deluxestogie method) they won't have had time to make ammonia.

To me, the real purpose of aging is to meld and mellow the various flavors in your blend. So long as you don't spritz your filler at all, and don't over damp your binder, a fresh cigar is perfectly ready to fire. I smoked on last night which had about twenty minutes on it -- just enough time to feed th dog. Burnt fine down to the nub.

Combining these two thoughts, we get this: When experimenting to find a new blend, smoke them right off the table. So long as your binder and wrapper aren't too damp, you are good to go. Only way to compare is to get smoking. While you are sampling your experiment, imagine how much better it would taste if you aged it four months to take the edge off.

If this is the blend you are looking for, then roll to stash. Roll a batch, set them out on the desk for a few days to a week, then put the best looking of them in a loose lid cigar box. By loose lid, I mean use a box without flanges, so that it doesn't seal super well, and which has not been seasoned like you do a humidor. A use a plywood box that Indian Motorcycles sent me some swag in. No humidification. Leave it set for a week or so. I call this dry boxing. Stir the contents of the box from time to time. Once they feel dry, label that box with a date and contents, and stash it in a coolidor for four months. This is my method here in super damp Dull-Aware. The air may be drier where you live.

The ones that don't look best, smoke them as you go, so that when you open your stash months down the road you aren't ashamed to pass them out to friends..
 
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#16
Thanks Mate for the heads up!
Aussie just a heads up to avoid hard feelings in the future, Don (FmGrowit) owns this forum and also www.wholeleaftobacco.com. The place you posted is his direct competitor. I know you're a noob and didn't realize it cause I didn't when I first joined. I'm not getting on you or trying to be a smart aleck, just trying to let you know the lay of the land.
 
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#17
Thank you for the great info!
Ammonia is the diaper pail smell you get when damp cigar leaf ferments. It gives you headache if you smoke it. Ammonia takes a few days to develop. So if you smoke them right off the table (the deluxestogie method) they won't have had time to make ammonia.

To me, the real purpose of aging is to meld and mellow the various flavors in your blend. So long as you don't spritz your filler at all, and don't over damp your binder, a fresh cigar is perfectly ready to fire. I smoked on last night which had about twenty minutes on it -- just enough time to feed th dog. Burnt fine down to the nub.

Combining these two thoughts, we get this: When experimenting to find a new blend, smoke them right off the table. So long as your binder and wrapper aren't too damp, you are good to go. Only way to compare is to get smoking. While you are sampling your experiment, imagine how much better it would taste if you aged it four months to take the edge off.

If this is the blend you are looking for, then roll to stash. Roll a batch, set them out on the desk for a few days to a week, then put the best looking of them in a loose lid cigar box. By loose lid, I mean use a box without flanges, so that it doesn't seal super well, and which has not been seasoned like you do a humidor. A use a plywood box that Indian Motorcycles sent me some swag in. No humidification. Leave it set for a week or so. I call this dry boxing. Stir the contents of the box from time to time. Once they feel dry, label that box with a date and contents, and stash it in a coolidor for four months. This is my method here in super damp Dull-Aware. The air may be drier where you live.

The ones that don't look best, smoke them as you go, so that when you open your stash months down the road you aren't ashamed to pass them out to friends..
 

Cigar

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#19
I have question here? I just rolled several nice cigars [first ones in awhile] and after few days resting tried 2/3 tonight and they lit and burned great [even had nice white ash on them] they were so harsh tasting like how can explain? like trying to relite a cigerette butt!! harsh/charcoal/burnt taste and these are {suppose to be} great cigar leaves?? Am hopeful that I just let them age/rest alittle longer maybe mellow out more?
 
Joined
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#20
I have question here? I just rolled several nice cigars [first ones in awhile] and after few days resting tried 2/3 tonight and they lit and burned great [even had nice white ash on them] they were so harsh tasting like how can explain? like trying to relite a cigerette butt!! harsh/charcoal/burnt taste and these are {suppose to be} great cigar leaves?? Am hopeful that I just let them age/rest alittle longer maybe mellow out more?
A little more info? I could see rolling nothing but ligero being harsh. What's the blend?
 
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