Whole Leaf Tobacco

A Kiln, Tobacco, the Process, and Why

Shao

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Hallo guys.I have always wondered why cigars had such a specific flavors.Sometimes I think they are making such flavors artificially.For example the leather flavor.I can't imagine how the plant should have an animal odor(The smell of a horse).
 

deluxestogie

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The leather-like aroma of cigar leaf is entirely natural. My home-grown Little Dutch, PA Red, Long Red, Dutch Ohio, Lancaster Seedleaf, Swarr-Hibshman and Glessnor all finish to a leathery, woody aroma. No magic. No artificial anything.

Finished leather does not smell anything like the sweat (butyric acid) of a horse or steer. What you are smelling in leather is a combination of volatile compounds from the staining and oiling.

Bob
 

vilbertob

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I am a little desperate .... I have fermented Virginia Bright and kentucky fire cured leaves in my kiln closed in cellophane bags. 11 weeks have passed and while kentucky no longer smells of ammonia the virginia leaves have it and it is still very strong ....
I also followed Bob's advice and brought the kiln from 122 to 127 fahreneit always with 80/85% humidity .... Nothing, however ... When I open the envelope the ammonia is very strong. What I do? Do I open everything and let them rest for a while?
 

Knucklehead

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I am a little desperate .... I have fermented Virginia Bright and kentucky fire cured leaves in my kiln closed in cellophane bags. 11 weeks have passed and while kentucky no longer smells of ammonia the virginia leaves have it and it is still very strong ....
I also followed Bob's advice and brought the kiln from 122 to 127 fahreneit always with 80/85% humidity .... Nothing, however ... When I open the envelope the ammonia is very strong. What I do? Do I open everything and let them rest for a while?
Yes. Let them rest awhile and allow the ammonia smell to dissipate. It is normal and not a sign of a problem.
 

burge

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I am a little desperate .... I have fermented Virginia Bright and kentucky fire cured leaves in my kiln closed in cellophane bags. 11 weeks have passed and while kentucky no longer smells of ammonia the virginia leaves have it and it is still very strong ....
I also followed Bob's advice and brought the kiln from 122 to 127 fahreneit always with 80/85% humidity .... Nothing, however ... When I open the envelope the ammonia is very strong. What I do? Do I open everything and let them rest for a while?
I have that happen when I open a vapor proof bag it is normal and part of the aging process. The leaves need air.
 

Jitterbugdude

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Did you open the bags once a day while they were in the kiln. As the leaves go through the fermentation process they produce by-products that need to be allowed to escape. If the bags were sealed the entire time there would be nowhere for the ammonia to go but to stay in the bag.
 
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