Whole Leaf Tobacco

Air cure methods

2Baccy

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Apr 6, 2018
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I have Virginia leaf that’s been hanging for 3 weeks or so. It is mostly brown with a tinge of green and yellow still. My question is can I remove the stem and place it loose in a cardboard boxes just so it would take up less space. It does not seem wet enough to mold to me?
I realize with too big a box and too much leaf weight I would be basicley pile curing/fermenting. But I’m talking about small amounts of leaf (1lb per box) loosely sitting in a small box inside a house. I want to free up the shed where I hang the leaf.
Also when is the earliest I can start the kilning process so I can start to try making chew? Should I wait till it’s fully browned?
Thanks
 

Alpine

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Eastern alps, near Trento, Italy
If possible, wait until all the green disappears, then expose the leaves to full sun or any other place where it can fully dry. Stems take longer to dry than lamina, so if you want to speed up things you can “frog leg” the leaves. I prefer to store my tobacco bone dry and tied in hands hung in the attic, but I have lots of space. Cardboard boxes are a fine choice since they let the leaves breathe and age, though at a slow pace, if rH and temps are right.
Once fully dried, you can start to kiln them.

Pier
 

ChinaVoodoo

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I'm not sure what state your tobacco is in. 3 weeks in eastern Canada? I kinda doubt it's dry enough to store. If you need the space and the lamina is dry, you can remove the mid rib and store it. Keep in mind, above 75% relative humidity, the likelihood of mold increases.
 

CT Tobaccoman

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Jun 28, 2014
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Southern New England
I have Virginia leaf that’s been hanging for 3 weeks or so. It is mostly brown with a tinge of green and yellow still. My question is can I remove the stem and place it loose in a cardboard boxes just so it would take up less space. It does not seem wet enough to mold to me?
I realize with too big a box and too much leaf weight I would be basicley pile curing/fermenting. But I’m talking about small amounts of leaf (1lb per box) loosely sitting in a small box inside a house. I want to free up the shed where I hang the leaf.
Also when is the earliest I can start the kilning process so I can start to try making chew? Should I wait till it’s fully browned?
Thanks
Wait until the leaf cures fully, and the midrib dries completely, so that it will break with a snap. Then re-humidify the tobacco and remove the midrib. The stem contributes to the curing process by leaking moisture into the lamina, helping to keep the leaf from drying too fast and drying green, which you don't ever want. Never remove the midrib before the leaf is fully cured,
 
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