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BarG's Bull Stuff

skychaser

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I feel that killing is a natural but dirty business and making it a "sport" by making it "fair" is just a way to lie to oneself to avoid shame that you shouldn't have in the first place. Besides, it will never be "fair" unless you go hand to hand and mount blades on his antlers. Just use the best tool for the job that you can afford.
I totally agree. I have always loved hunting. I love every thing about it except for the actual killing part. No joy there. I want it to be as quick and instantaneous as possible. Rifle only for me and I always go for the neck shot. Hit a deer through the neck and spinal column and they drop in their tracks. They never know what hit them. And if you miss, you miss clean. Haven't missed a one yet. And I don't ruin any good meat. Had a lot of guys knock on my door over the years who wanted to bow hunt on my land. I say nope, sorry.

I always have thought it should be legal to hunt anything you want year round. As long as you use only what nature equipped you with. It takes a real man to wait perched in a tree, leap onto a passing bear, and then choke it out with your bare hands. :)
 

plantdude

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I feel that killing is a natural but dirty business and making it a "sport" by making it "fair" is just a way to lie to oneself to avoid shame that you shouldn't have in the first place. Besides, it will never be "fair" unless you go hand to hand and mount blades on his antlers. Just use the best tool for the job that you can afford.
Does don't have antlers:ROFLMAO:
Got to disagree with you about that shame aspect. To me bringing deer in over a food source gets to be a little too much like feeding pets. You get meat, but you miss out on the learning opportunities. I would rather study the deer and learn their movements without as much human interference as possible. They are fascinating and there is a lot to be learned and appreciated from them and the days spent being out in nature. The number of deer I see and let walk away generally out number the amount of a deer I kill a season by easily 10:1. Im not a trophy hunter and personally I could care less about antlers, I'm after meat. Bucks in the rut generally taste strong to me and have a funny odor, I don't care for them. I've gotten to where I prefer to take a few young deer/fawns or does if I see that there are plenty of deer in the area.

There is a huge disconnect in the modern world where it's to easy order a Big Mac and not think twice about where it came from. It was once a living breathing being with feelings and emotions - and that probably applies to the small amount of beef in the hamburger as well;) I think there would be a lot less waste and a lot more vegetarians if people were responsible for killing and processing there own meat - which could be a good thing. A nice quick clean kill is always the goal, and often much faster and more kind than death in the natural world typically is.
 

plantdude

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I totally agree. I have always loved hunting. I love every thing about it except for the actual killing part. No joy there. I want it to be as quick and instantaneous as possible. Rifle only for me and I always go for the neck shot. Hit a deer through the neck and spinal column and they drop in their tracks. They never know what hit them. And if you miss, you miss clean. Haven't missed a one yet. And I don't ruin any good meat. Had a lot of guys knock on my door over the years who wanted to bow hunt on my land. I say nope, sorry.

I always have thought it should be legal to hunt anything you want year round. As long as you use only what nature equipped you with. It takes a real man to wait perched in a tree, leap onto a passing bear, and then choke it out with your bare hands. :)
Longer seasons would be nice. Most public land in Arkansas only has a five day modern gun deer season even though bow season runs a few months. Got to get out there during the archery season and learn what the deer are doing before modern gun season. Of course opening day of the modern gun season changes everything as soon as the first few shots are fired and the onslaught of hunters descend.
I don't know about leaping from a tree to choke out a bear, but I did flash a group of does once. Walked in off the edge of a field and figured I should take a leak before I walked in to hunt. Leaned the crossbow up against a tree a few feet away and start going and three does and two fawns walked out of the thicket straight towards me. They just stopped about 8 feet away and stared. I'm not sure if they were shocked or laughing (it was cold out you know). @ChinaVoodoo i did feel a little shame on that trip for flashing the ladies:ROFLMAO:
 

skychaser

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China didn't say you should feel ashamed. He said you shouldn't. And that making it more sporting or fair was just a way of kidding yourself about the reality of what you are doing. At least that is my take on it. ??

Baiting deer was illegal here until a few years ago. A change I totally disagree with. Shooting a deer from a blind while it is eating from a feeder isn't hunting in my book. And there are so many deer around here that if you can't find one to shoot, you don't deserve one. My first deer I ever shot was a doe. But shooting does or fawns is considered kid stuff by most people, which I was way back then. Our general deer season is about a month or more. And there is also a late buck season in December. And some areas that are open longer and some for less time than others. Archery season runs for several months starting in Sept and overlaps the general season. I have a few antlers to show off myself, but the best eating are definataly those young guys. Spikes and fork horns.

And yup, I think people should see an animal butchered at least once. They would appreciate that Big Mac a lot more. Or grow carrots. lol Dying a natural death is usually a pretty awful way to go for most animals. Usually it's from disease or starvation in old age. Or if you are lucky, something catches you for dinner and it's over pretty quickly. There are so many deer in WA that if hunters (and cars) didn't thin them out they would quickly over populate the resources they have and there would be massive die offs in winter. So hunters are kind of essential in keeping them at a stable and healthy population level. And so are the wolves, imho.
 

skychaser

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What do you have there plantdude? Whitetails? We have Whitetails and Mule deer here in the east. And Blacktails on the coast. Blacktails are tiny deer. Mules can easily go 200 lbs.
 

plantdude

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Maybe I misinterpreted. I'm ok with his opinion either way and enjoy hearing from him. if people didn't have different opinions from time to time life would be very boring;)
We just have whitetails down here. They are smaller than the whitetails in the northern states. In some areas they are exceptionally tiny. There's a group of them out by the white river that look like pigmy whitetails. I think my dog probably weighs more than some of the deer around here. The further I have to drag them the more I appreciate little deer though;)

One trip I shot three deer within about 10 minutes of each other, two does and a fawn (no spots, but not full grown yet). The first deer came out of the thicket behind me and couldn't have been more than fifteen feet away from where I was sitting on the ground. Couldn't handly see her through the scope she was so close and I made a point of not shooting over her. She took off after the shot and I thought I had missed and must have shot over her after all but made myself sit and wait before I got up to look in the thicket. I didn't think I could miss one that close and figured the bullet wouldn't have expanded as much at that range so I didn't want to rush it if she was just wounded and bleeding out. Not five minutes passed and I see a deer about 60 yards off where I knew a small creek was. I shot and look back through the scope and see a deer standing there and think damn did I miss that one too then realized she must have had a fawn with her. I figured the fawn would need years of therapy after seeing it's mother shot so I went ahead and got that one too.
Get down there and of course they were on the opposite side of the creek so I had to go aways down to find a place to cross. I threw the fawn back across the creek and drug the mom back down to where I crossed. As I'm coming back I see the first deer I had shot, she had run about 50 yards through the opposite side of the thicket and collapsed and probably spooked the mother and fawn to where I saw them. I get back to the fawn and feel like I'm forgetting something. Look back across the creek and my gun is leaning against a tree on the opposite side... Son of a... Back down and across the creek again...
I was a tired puppy after field dressing and making multiple trips dragging all three deer over a quarter mile, I've not complained about small deer since that day:)
 

skychaser

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3 deer would get you a spanking from the game warden here. And one big ticket! I drug a Whitetale buck a good quarter mile through the woods once. He weighed about the same as me at the time. Thought I was gonna die before I got to the road. And you gotta tie up the front legs and head or they flop around and hang up on everything. I always liked hunting the woods behind my house. Sometimes I'd end up getting a deer a half mile away. There are no roads, but I can drive my tractor out there and snake my way through the trees and bring them home in the loader bucket. If it's near dark I gut them and winch them up a tree so the coyotes don't get them, and go bring them home in the morning. Maybe I got lazy in my old age. Or maybe I just got smarter.

I didn't mean to come down on people who like to hunt with a bow. I do get it. It's largely the challenge. You aren't going to be dropping anything from 300 yards off. You gotta get close! But you can get the same challenge with a rifle. Just take one bullet with you. You will get close enough to make sure that one shot counts.
 

ChinaVoodoo

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We have white tail, mule deer, elk, moose, mountain sheep, and antelope. We also, technically have bison, and goat. And then there's black bear and cougar. Depending on where you are, you can get one antlered whitetail, and two antlerless. Mule deer are, in most places, a draw. You can usually get either an antlered or antlerless on the first try. Most elk zones are open for full rack and draws or banned for antlerless. Same with sheep. Goat and bison are a lottery, and I've never met anyone who shot one. Moose is easy to draw for every year if you're willing to travel, or its every few years near the city. Antelope don't live around here. I don't know much about them. Seasons depend on the zone you're in. Some rifle seasons go from mid September to Nov 30. Within 90 ish miles of Edmonton, it's Nov 1-Nov 30.
 

ChinaVoodoo

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You could theoretically get at least 7 deer. There's the three general whitetails, two mule deer draws, then the special Strathcona county, 2 deer of any type license. Then, I think there's another two on a Canadian Forces Base. Then by the Saskatchewan border, there's even higher limits, so maybe you can in theory get like 10 deer.
 

Brown Thumb

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3 deer would get you a spanking from the game warden here. And one big ticket! I drug a Whitetale buck a good quarter mile through the woods once. He weighed about the same as me at the time. Thought I was gonna die before I got to the road. And you gotta tie up the front legs and head or they flop around and hang up on everything. I always liked hunting the woods behind my house. Sometimes I'd end up getting a deer a half mile away. There are no roads, but I can drive my tractor out there and snake my way through the trees and bring them home in the loader bucket. If it's near dark I gut them and winch them up a tree so the coyotes don't get them, and go bring them home in the morning. Maybe I got lazy in my old age. Or maybe I just got smarter.

I didn't mean to come down on people who like to hunt with a bow. I do get it. It's largely the challenge. You aren't going to be dropping anything from 300 yards off. You gotta get close! But you can get the same challenge with a rifle. Just take one bullet with you. You will get close enough to make sure that one shot counts.
I have 12 Acres and any shot from 3 sides of my property could ricochet and hit a house or person not too far off with my 270.
I will stick with my crossbow.
I only take one arrow with me and knock on wood they all dropped within 75 Yrds.
Ain’t Never lost one yet.
 

plantdude

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The place where I got the three was a six deer limit area. The only catch is you have to shoot and check a female before you can take a buck. It's timber country land that they allow the agfc to manage for hunting. There are tons of deer there and they are happy to get the numbers down. That is some of the ruffest areas I hunt though. Most of it either very dense thickets or sparse trees with tall grass interwoven with greenbrier. I made the mistake once of trying to drag a deer straight to the road rather than going back and hitting a small path. Took me close to an hour to get that sucker through about 100 yards of green briar and I was a bloody mess at the end of it.
 
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