Whole Leaf Tobacco

Boiler2326's grow blog 2019

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#21
Getting the garden ready. This is also the first year for it. Lots of work to do but I'm getting there. I could use a few more of these dry days.

526570575_polarr.jpg IMG_20190406_200204-2024x1518(1).jpg

The bamboo, if you can see it, will be for the peas.

The idea, for now, is to attempt a no-till garden. However, should that be unsuccessful, it will still remain very tillable.
 

deluxestogie

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#22
My tobacco planting approach has varied from double-dug beds to no-till, with most grows in between. The tobacco in double-dug (~24" deep tilling) required more initial labor, and more water through the summer, but seemed to produce larger leaf. And double-dug beds can be planted more densely, if you need to do that. No till required the least water, but growth was a bit slower. The real difference was in the blow-down rate. Every summer I get at least one hefty wind storm at a point when the soil is already saturated. The double-dug plants toppled like paper dolls. The no till plants hardly budged.

For my garden, erosion is a zero problem, so that doesn't enter the question.

Currently I do a light tilling (to mix in my fertilizer), and leave it at that. If it's time to add more compost, then I dig more deeply. So every year with a good wind storm, a few plants need re-standing (tedious but easy), but none are flattened or snapped off at the ground.

Looks like you wouldn't need to haul out much of a hose to water that tidy garden. You're off to an excellent start.

Bob
 
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#23
Some of my Wisconsin 901 leaves have started to yellow slightly. Attached is a picture. There was no fertilizer in the soil to begin with, do you think they could benefit from some fish emulsion? IMG_20190413_140533-2277x3036.jpg

Top middle are the ones I'm talking about. Not the small plants, the larger ones.
 

GreenDragon

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#24
When my seedlings reached that size I started watering using Miracle Grow at 1/2 strength. They greened right back up. Also, you might want to give the larger leaves a haircut.
 
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#25
I had been thinking hair cut for the past few days, I just haven't had time to get around to it. They will be getting miracle grow today, will report back how everything greens up.
 

deluxestogie

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#26
I had been thinking hair cut for the past few days, I just haven't had time to get around to it.
Forgive me. I'm going to moralize.

Admiral William McRaven wrote a book entitled, Make Your Bed: Little Things That Can Change Your Life...And Maybe the World. One core concept is not about the importance of having a made bed, but rather about the psychological burden of leaving little things undone. Starting the day by immediately clearing a simple task sets a pace for the remainder of the day.

This probably applies as well to folding the laundry, washing the dishes, and any other simple but nagging task. For myself, having a zero backlog of truly simple things liberates my motivation to initiate other activities. And I am always, always surprised at how little time these weighty tasks actually require.

I have 196 seedlings. It takes me 15 minutes to do a haircut. It's an annoying nuisance, about weekly, for a few weeks. I can't account for how much better I feel about the world after clipping them each time.

I never make my bed.

Preacher Bob
 
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#27
I would rather hair cut once. The physiological response of the plant to it happens. Why do subsequent haircuts other than to save space? Is it because you don't want to repot?
 

deluxestogie

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#28
The physiologic response (by the roots) wanes with time. (Why--the plant asks itself--waste precious root resources after the leaf predation has ceased?) So, repeated clipping prolongs the effect. Also, as I've noted before, it prevents shading within the 1020 tray. Re-potting seems to make zero difference in plant height and growth by 3 weeks after transplant, when compared to repeatedly clipped plants kept in the 1020 tray. I would expend the additional labor and money to re-pot, if there were a significant, measurable benefit.

Bob
 
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#30
Perhaps a question I should have asked prior to fertilizing. I made the assumption that the dose you use for fertilizing is half the indoor plant recommendations on the box (1 tsp?). That was the lower of the two, so I feel confident I did no harm. Less confident that what I used was sufficient to eliminate the yellowing.
 
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