Whole Leaf Tobacco

Cigarette casing recipe

CT Tobaccoman

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Don, good catch on that, the casing I had devised back then was quite strong and really changed the tobacco flavor. If you're wanting a good casing to make your cigarettes actually taste like cigarettes (;)) get WLT's casing.

The stuff I make and sell is more for pipe tobacco.
I've been using the WLT casing for flue cured and like it fine. Would like a bigger bottle, tho.
 

deluxestogie

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...antifreeze (propylene glycol)
Antifreeze is ethylene glycol, which is poisonous.

Propylene glycol is USDA approved as a food additive, and is often used as the solvent for water-based food flavorings. Propylene glycol also acts as a humectant, and has modest anti-fungal properties.

Bob
 

CT Tobaccoman

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Bob,

Glad to hear that. Interestingly, I "learned" that "antifreeze" referred to a propylene glycol was added to cigarettes on a virulently anti smoking web page. The prohibitionists are not above disinformation, apparently.

CT
 

niko

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I did some research into easy replacements for certain items, recipe scaling down, and reasons for use. If you see an error please discuss it.

ItemMeasurementReplacement ForReason for replacementReason for use
Cocoa power13.4 tablespoonsCocoa and chocolateEasier over all processAdd very light flavor, reduce harshness
licorice extract1 teaspoonLicorice GranulesEasier to obtainAdd flavor, reduce ammonia flavor
honey5 tablespoonsInvert SyrupEasier to obtainpreserves,flavors, helps deliver nicotine
Corn syrup10 tablespoonspreserves
Glycerine USP10 tablespoonspreserves, seems to aid in burning
Table Salt1/2 teaspoonSodium BenzoatePossible Carcinogen (FDA)preserves
Purified Water15 tablespoons“water”Clear of hard water chemicalhelps spread mixture onto leaf
I am new to this forum, so hello all.

I haven't read the whole thread but when I saw table salt in the recipe I wanted to warn readers that putting table salt in something that will burn is not a good idea because it is very likely to cause dioxin formation -which is a really nasty toxin- and it won't do much in the way of preserving at such low amounts. You can experiment with propylene glycol; it has antimicrobial properties equivalent to ethyl alcohol and should be safe in such a scenario, as far as I know.
 

deluxestogie

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Welcome to the forum, Niko. [Feel free to tell us about yourself in the Introduce Yourself forum.]

Your comment about combusting salty mixtures of organics is well noted.

Salt is commonly used in chew and snus recipes. I'm not aware of any casing recipes for smoking tobacco that use NaCl. I'm not sure where Michibacy found that convenient "substitution."

Bob
 

Orson Carte

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I'd be interested to know how other forum members, who have used a prepared casing on their tobacco, actually applied it.
In my first 'experiment' I misted my concoction over the shredded tobacco that I had spread out thinly in large trays. I made it pretty damp and then just left it in my fermenter to dry it down again to about 18% moisture.
I was really quite pleased with the perceived enhancement but now that I am about to case another shredded kilogram I am wondering if there is a better method that someone has discovered.
For example, I wondered if the tobacco was tied in a muslin bag, or similar, and totally immersed in the liquid it might give a better overall penetration of the liquid - but some of the finer stuff might become unrecoverable. I also wondered if it might be better to apply the casing to the whole leaf (and then drying) before putting it through the shredder.
I'd be grateful to hear any comments.
Thanks.
 
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instead of a water base try coffee. 8 oz coffee 1tbs chocolate syrup
Old, old thread I know but I was wondering if I'd read this.
Tobacco is outrageously expensive here so black-market 'chop-chop' is very popular.

It is sold bone dry & needs to be brought back to case (Did I say that right?)
My local tobacconist showed me his. He had used water only & it already smelled of mould.

This can cause lung infections off course so I advised him to ask the supplier how to do it properly (I had no clue)
Next time I saw him he proudly showed me his latest effort. It smelt exactly like a good quality tobacco. Tasted like one too.

The ingredients in the recipe he was given was simply water, vinegar & coffee. Even once told, I could not detect either smell.
The vinegar acts as a preservative I think.

I've been meaning to get the recipe. I'll ask next time I see him & share here if anyone's interested.
 

deluxestogie

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Water works perfectly well for bringing dry tobacco into smokable case (flexible enough to handle without crumbling to dust). Mold is only a problem if the tobacco is brought to so high a moisture content that it looks and feels like commercial tobacco treated with glycerine and polypropylene glycol. Both of the latter chemicals have mold-inhibiting properties, and even better, allow tobacco to be super squishy--forever. Both of them also add bite.

All of my tobacco is brought into case with water only, and stored in low case. No mold. No coffee. No acetic acid (vinegar). No tutti frutti. Just water.

Bob
 
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The difference is Bob is that you've had plenty of experience. The tobacconist had none.
His first effort that smelled mouldy, didn't seem too moist but I'm also not experienced at bringing tobacco back to case.

Apart from the mouldy smell, his first attempt didn't smell as tobacco should. In fact it didn't have much of a smell other than ammonia like.
His 2nd effort with the coffee & vinegar smelled really good.

For whatever reason Idk but he's selling the stuff. And to be fair I'd take the coffee & vinegar cased tobacco over his mouldy stuff any day.
 

deluxestogie

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I'd take the coffee & vinegar cased tobacco over his mouldy stuff any day
Good choice! [McClelland pipe blends used vinegar as their preservative.]

About the mold, tobacco sitting in high case for 3 to 5 days will begin to mold. As it slowly dries, the mold is still there, and there is no way to make it better. Part of my experience is the loss of some of my own laboriously produced tobacco to mold--from carelessness and inattentiveness. One instance was a large bag of beautiful black Cavendish that I began as seed.

The ammonia smell is always from the slow breakdown of albuminous proteins that have not been fully eliminated from the leaf lamina, by curing or by aging or by kilning. Well aged tobacco that has an ammonia smell may have already cleared those proteins, but needs simply to be aired out, due to air-tight storage.

All of us start off uncertain about the hundreds of peculiarities related to producing and finishing tobacco. My personal approach has mostly been to lean away from additives to solve specific problems. There is nothing inherently better about my approach. This forum is chock full of discussions of various additives.

Bob
 

Muggs

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Think the amounts used here would depend on how much tobacco you'll be working.
1 teaspoons of coco powder would be plenty for a hand.
 
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