Buy Tobacco Leaf Online | Whole Leaf Tobacco

Cigars by the Pound

deluxestogie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
21,870
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
Cigars by the Pound

Garden20220226_6246_cigarByThePound_326x500.jpg
Garden20220226_6247_cigarByThePound_RosaCuba_241x500.jpg


I just received these. They are from JRCigars Dutch Auctions. In a Dutch auction, the item (say a bundle of cigars) is typically offered as a lot of 20 bundles. You bid what you will pay per item, but can specify any number—1 bundle or up to 20 bundles. While some lots in the Dutch Auction completely sell out by the end of the auction, many sell only a few bundles, and the rest just languish.

For these Rosa Cuba 6 x 60 mixed-filler cigars, I placed my bid for two of the bundles. At the close, only 15 of the 20 available had been sold.

I refuse to pay a vassal tribute or hostage ransom to any company, just for the privilege of spending my money there. (i.e. I am not a "member" or a "prime" anything.) These two bundles cost me $31.50 for the cigars, tax and shipping. So these cigars cost me $14 per pound. Usual JR Price is $43.15 per bundle of 20. The MSRP is delusional.
  • Are they great cigars?: no
  • Are they crummy smokes?: no
  • Are they enjoyable?: definitely yes.
The wrapper is Ecuador Sumatra, and the binder is from Nicaragua.

In general, factory made, mixed filler cigars (short filler), exhibit poor quality control, which is evident in uneven draw (some are unsmokable) and uneven burn. But my home-rolled short filler cigars always, always have an excellent draw and a decent burn. The issue comes down to Lieberman bunchers being fed too much filler for the mold size. At home, when I roll short filler cigars, I can feel how much traction the binder/wrapper should apply to the filler, to assure a decent draw. I simply do not use a cigar mold for these.

My secret to happily purchasing a couple of pounds of cheapo mixed filler cigars is to go for the larger ring size. A minimum of 50 seems to do the trick. A 60 ring is nearly foolproof. The binder tensile strength required to compress a cigar to a particular density increases rapidly as the ring gauge increases. At 60, binders simply split open, if they are required to compress the filler to a density that is no longer smokable.

[By the same logic, I find home-rolling a very thin cigar that draws well to be far more challenging than rolling a fat cigar.]

These fat cigars cost me (total real cost) just under 79 cents each, with no labor.

Cigar snobs can always apply a beautiful, expensive wrapper to these 79 cent cigars. Nobody will know!

Bob
 

deluxestogie

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
21,870
Points
113
Location
near Blacksburg, VA
Garden20221016_6702_cigar_HalfOf_JRExcaliburEmperor_700.jpg


This rather nice robusto (4¼ x 52) began its life as a JR Alternative Excalibur Emperor (8½ x 52). These are routinely priced at $62.80 for a bundle of 20. I purchased the bundle in a JR auction for $27.42.

Since I am not man enough to smoke such a gargantuan cigar, I set my tuck cutter for a length of 4¼", then simply cut the cigar in half, always smoking the foot half first, since the head end is capped and glued.

Garden20221016_6703_cigar_cutting_JRExcaliburEmperor_700.jpg


Although the quality control of JR Alternatives has diminished (after the company was purchased by a marketeering conglomerate), and some of their JR Alternative cigars are no longer well-made, the larger the ring gauge, the greater the probability that the cigar will draw well. This bundle has so far drawn perfectly (especially after being chopped in half!).

Cutting these oversized hunkers in half, means that each 4¼-inch "rubusto" cost me less than 69 cents.

Bob
 
Top