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Deluxestogie Grow Log 2018

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skychaser

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Man, you are lucky. You will have a Christmas with snow!
Spoken like someone who hasn't had to live and work in the s*** for 4 months a year all his life. lol

I want to spend Christmas with Jenny. Sitting in the shade sipping lemonade while the steaks are on the barbecue. No shoveling or plowing to do and no frozen toes! That would be a nice Christmas. :D
 

deluxestogie

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Our Tilted View of Things

Garden20181211_4078_sunriseMovement_700.jpg


Ah! The wayward sun! It rises; it zooms across the sky; it sets. It peeks above the horizon at different locations, depending on the time of year, and sets at different points. The days are faster or slower.

But we all know, deep down inside, that the sun just sits out there, never rising, never setting, completely ignoring us. In summer or winter, day or night, it's just there, busily consuming itself. We define out days and our seasons and our years by the movements of a sun that does not move.

Garden20181211_4076_zeroTemp_600.jpg


But at least it's there! Otherwise that zero on my porch thermometer this morning would be absolute.

Bob
 

skychaser

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brrr You have my usual weather. It's a balmy 29 here this morning with light snow. Only 3 inches on the ground.
The sun has nearly bottomed out. In a few days it will start returning to the north.
 

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ciennepi

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Spoken like someone who hasn't had to live and work in the s*** for 4 months a year all his life. lol

I want to spend Christmas with Jenny. Sitting in the shade sipping lemonade while the steaks are on the barbecue. No shoveling or plowing to do and no frozen toes! That would be a nice Christmas. :D
The bad and the nice is always relative.;)
I life in Northen Italy at an altitude of about 3400 ft and normally there are about 4 months of snow. This lasts years, perhaps for the climate change,the snow come later and vanish early and for me this is a bad thing.
 

JennyLeez

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China:
I guess your mailman isn't as dedicated as this one:
Your post 617 - I would be jumping up and down if my courier attempted that. Talk about lazy !!!!

CT Tobaccoman:
I loath windows 10. As with each version, bigger, slower, a memory hogger. Bring back windows 95.
I actually dont use windows if I can help it. Linux is the way to go :)

Skychaser:
want to spend Christmas with Jenny. Sitting in the shade sipping lemonade while the steaks are on the barbecue. No shoveling or plowing to do and no frozen toes! That would be a nice Christmas.
Yes must admit a summer Christmas is easier especially with family home. We pitch tents and send them out back with instructions, no peeing on my tobacco plants :)
It does not snow here so I am unfamiliar with what that entails and prefer it that way after reading the above :)

Cheers
 

deluxestogie

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This may come as no surprise, but I currently have a well-preserved, now seldom run, 1991 computer--a Gateway 2000 Intel 386/33c desktop computer (the absolutely fastest thing you could buy). It's been upgraded all the way to a Pentium 66 over the years. [For the techno-minded, that's 66 megahertz. Todays systems are running at about 500 times that speed, at ~3 gigahertz.] But the beast still runs--and it runs Windows 95! A full 16 megabytes of RAM; a custom 1 MB graphics accelerator; 3 hard drives, each storing 80 mebabytes; a cutting edge 3.5" floppy drive; and the 5.25" floppy drive has been replaced by a Zip drive.

I own only one keyboard capable of connecting to the Gateway. A mouse connects using a 9-pin serial port. It's never heard of USB, and couldn't run the drivers for it anyway. I no longer have a printer that will connect to it, and it's monitor (the latest that Windows 95 will support) is a massive CRT. It can't recognize an LCD monitor, even if I could devise a cable adapter. Windows 95 will crash during boot-up, if the system has more than about 400 MB of RAM memory. [I'm posting this using a 4-year-old system with 12,000 MB of RAM.] The max hard drive size is 32 GB. Windows 95 is a hybrid 16-bit/32-bit operating system. It can't run any of the current 64-bit programs.

As for games, it can run StarCraft (released in 1998). Most newer games (i.e. from the last two decades) just won't run, even if the system had enough room to install them, which it doesn't.

I wouldn't dare to rig my Windows 95 system to connect to the internet today. Back when it's telephone land line modem connected, the Internet was a safer place. If it were to connect today, it would be invaded and infected within less than a minute. Totally hopeless. Windows 95 never anticipated the nastiness of people, and security was only the venue of hardware firewall vendors. A conscientious user would regularly run an anti-virus scan once a month, and the anti-virus vendors would update their virus data once every few weeks. [Today, I run a real-time anti-malware application, which updates its malware data every hour. The system is scanned daily by two different anti-malware programs. None of this software would even run on Windows 95.]

Nearly every current application and every current piece of hardware would not be recognized by Window 95, and drivers from the vendors would not run on Windows 95. (No "plug and play" here!)

Summary: Windows 95, like any nostalgia, is a fantasy of yesteryear, but would be virtually useless today. Don't wish for a '57 Chevy, unless you've actually driven one of the clunkers recently.

Bob
 

ChinaVoodoo

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I used a 2.56MHz "IBM compatible" with no hard drive or modem from '91 until '99. It was capable of doing everything i needed it for in technical school from word processing to spreadsheets to tables and graphs.

By the way, until we switched from handwritten carbon copy reports at work, some time in the last decade, to modern software and laser printers, I was using a dot matrix printer, spreadsheet and mail merge to populate and print reports through carbon copy.

My thumb thanked me for it.
 

deluxestogie

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Um...My first home computer (1976) was a SOL-20, S-100-bus monster that ran the latest Intel 8080A chip. 48k RAM (the max). I rigged it with three 5.25" floppy drives as well as one 8" floppy drive. The 8-bit system (NorthStar DOS) booted from one of the small floppies. My dot-matrix printer was a 128-column DEC-writer that stood on the floor like a teletype machine. The whole shebang cost about $6000 (in 1976 dollars!). That was way before IBM ventured into the home-computer market. In order to connect my DEC-writer to my SOL-20, I had to write my own driver software in assembler, then compile it into machine language. [Which bits of which 8-bit CPU registers should be assigned to which of the 25 pins of the printer interface for each 8-bit byte of text output?]

I owned the very first word-processing software (Electric Pencil) written for a home computer. And I actually created the very first mail-merge application for a home computer (and stupidly did not market it).

I was a contributing editor to Creative Computing magazine in 1979, and published articles on related subjects there, as well as in Kilobaud and Interface Age. Today, the average 9 year old knows more computer stuff than I ever wrote in those magazines (except maybe for binary search algorithms).

Again...nostalgia is nice, but today's smart doorbell is more powerful than that old SOL-20.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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When it comes to computers, the giants are standing on the shoulders of midgets. In the early 20th century, an automobile driver had a lever on the side of the steering column for advancing and retarding the ignition spark. The setting had to be adjusted with the current rpm of the engine. Never mind the ratchet crank needed to start the engine.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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Here's a wonderful article from the BBC on the woman who designed the first stand-alone word processor.

Word processor pioneer Evelyn Berezin dies aged 93
Ms Berezin had intended to buy the processors required from Intel, which had gone into business in 1968. But it said it was too busy dealing with orders for its memory chips.​
The solution was that Redactron had to design some of the chips required itself and provide the schematics to two manufacturers.​
There were further problems with a prototype when it was put on display in a New York hotel for reporters to see.​
The issue was that in dry weather, it was prone to a build-up of static electricity, which caused sparks to fly between its circuits, preventing it from working.​
"To our horror it was a dry day and the engineers were setting this non-working machine up for our big story," Ms Berezin said.​
"Ed Wolf [our head of engineering brought] a full pail of water and without a word to anyone throws the pail of water over the whole thick carpet in the room.​
"The water sank into the carpet, which stayed damp for three or four hours, and the machine worked perfectly."​
Bob
 

Charly

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I begun playing with computers way after Bob, but I remember clearly those 386 and 486 (DX2 66MHz ! With 8 Mo Ram) which were powerfull enough to run Windows 3.1 and a good amount of softwares and games !

When I compare with the power nowadays PCs have, I can't believe how slow they are...
(Of course, we can do a lot of things we weren't able to do before, but how many times do I run out of Ram with only a few softwares running... with exactly 1024 times more Ram than in those old years....)
 
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