Whole Leaf Tobacco

Deluxestogie Grow Log 2020

deluxestogie

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I intended to roll up one this morning, but I over-sprayed the crispy filler. So I had to wait for it to dry down, prior to rolling. Now it's all rolled and happy, and resting overnight. The filler is all home-grown Corojo 99 from 2018, wrapped in a double binder of Cameroon. Nothing fancy.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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So, let it be written. So, let it be done.



I have just set up my tobacco germination for 2020. Each of these jars, which I filled with starting mix some time ago, received ¼ cup of tap water (well water, no chlorine). With only one cup's lid off at a time, the appropriate seed was lightly sprinkled from its tiny Ziplock onto the surface. This was misted several times, then the lid closed. The seven jars will live on a baking sheet that rests on a seedling heat mat.
  • Corojo 99
  • Piloto Cubano
  • Olor
  • Prilep 66-9/7
  • MD 609
  • Swarr-Hibshman
  • Little Dutch
I collected the Little Dutch seed in 2011. So this is also a reality check on my seed preservation approach. I have newer seed for Little Dutch, in case the nine year old seed is toast.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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Leaf in the shed was in case, so I stripped all the hanging stalks of Piloto Cubano this morning (before the temperature rose, and dropped the humidity). Since the lower third of each stalk had been leaf primed (the 8+ foot stalks won't fit my hanging space), this represents all the leaf from the upper 2/3 of 16 stalks.



The leaf is jammed into the bag fairly well. I'll allow the open bag to dry down indoors, since I can't kiln it right now. All together, I discarded maybe 6 or 7 leaves that looked crummy.

Bob
 

LeftyRighty

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I collected the Little Dutch seed in 2011. So this is also a reality check on my seed preservation approach. I have newer seed for Little Dutch, in case the nine year old seed is toast.
Good Luck - I also am trying to start Little Dutch from 2011, started my seed on March 9th, about 2 weeks ago, along with a several other cigar strains from 2011. Finally, got 4 of the Little Dutch seedlings to pop up, out of about 3+ dozen seeds.
Of the other cigar strains, The Florida Sumatra sprouted like new seed, Havana 142 and Wisc Seedleaf was almost as good, and a few TN Red. No seedlings from the others yet. FYI - these seeds were stored in a mason jar in a cardboard box in the basement.
I've ordered a dozen new cigar seed packets from NWT, will get this week, and started.
I haven't grown any cigar stains since 2011 (am a cigarette smoker), and most of that cigar crop was a flop - I didn't tend to these like my cig tobac. Anyway, my son is now into an occasional cigar smoker, and asked about me growing some for him. I will give it another go this season. I'm trying about a dozen strains, just a few plants of each, and we'll see if he likes Missouri-grown cigars.
 
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LeftyRighty

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Good luck with your grow. I can't remember if you have a kiln.

Bob
yep - I flue-cure my bright leaf strains in it.
After I've flue-cured them, I start flue-ferment aging the burley, turkish, etc.
Usually, at least the last few years, I let the air-cured strains over-winter in the unheated shed, and ferment them in the spring. I've found that if you have a few green streaks in the air-cured tobacco, letting them go in-out of case over-winter, the green goes away.
 

deluxestogie

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Of the 7 varieties that I started, 5 of them show green, and the other two are waking up. Today, Little Dutch looks like Little Forest. I'll probably begin transferring seedlings to their tray cells tomorrow. Just as an aside, the MD 609 seed came from Knucklehead in 2014, and germinated well.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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My Little Dutch and Prilep 66-9/7 have now been transferred to their individual cells in a 1020 tray.





The three other trays are set up and ready to receive their guests. Maybe tomorrow.

After recharging the battery of my Oh Deere! lawn tractor for two days straight, it finally sprang to life again this afternoon. With about 1 acre to mow, I was able to get about half of it belatedly mowed for the first time this season. Gosh, it was really deep and succulent. But with 20 mph winds, I felt like I was slowly driving through a blizzard. Unfortunately, it will likely rain most of the day tomorrow, so I'll have to assuage my profound disappointment with some other activity.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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Ho. Hum. Not very interesting, watching the roots grow on my tiny tobacco seedlings. Tick...tick...tick...tick. A few veggie seeds popped up in their 3" pots. Today was my first lunch without eating a peanut butter and jelly sandwich in longer than I can remember. Ran out of sandwich bread yesterday. I'll have to bake some...mañana, maybe. But I have plenty of food. It was definitely time to eat some of those stale oyster crackers sitting on the back corner atop my fridge. [No matter how stale crackers get--except for mold, they never become toxic. Just meh.] The antidote is, as everyone knows, a fistful of honey roasted peanuts.

But it was an exciting day nonetheless. I went around the house, collecting the small trash bags from three (Count them! Three!) different rooms. Then I crushed 4 empty milk jugs, and added them to the kitchen trash. Nearly nothing that will spoil and stink goes into my kitchen trash. I then bundled up the kitchen trash bag, replaced it with a clean one, and drove to the local trash dumpster. (Rural areas don't usually provide residential trash pick-up. Rather than pick-up, it's delivery.)

This was the first time I've gone anywhere in three weeks. I tossed the bags, got back into my 1995 Buick Regal, and returned home. Didn't even need to wear a mask.

Hmm. Now, what to do with the rest of the day.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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A storm just blew through here. Small hail turned my gravel driveway completely white in a span of about 30 seconds. 60+ mph winds. The air temperature dropped 15°F in about 1 minute. Awesome. Fortunately, my four ancient maple trees have not yet leafed out. I shut down my computer, took it inside from the front porch, then sat out there again to watch the storm--since I had just lit a freshly rolled cigar. [Some things are more important than life and limb.] The filler was one very large leaf of Mata Fina and a very large leaf of Habano 2000, wrapped in a double binder of Cameroon. The Mata Fina burns so easily that it brought the fire-proof Habano 2000 along with it, even at 100% humidity and severe winds.

Power is still on, and my Internet cable still works.

If this had happened with tobacco in the ground, there would be nothing left but stalks and stems. And it wouldn't have blown down, since the hail preceded the high winds.

Bob
 

desert_pioneer

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Hey deluxestogie, I recently started moving the strongest looking seedlings into pots, which will be their home until hopefully outside. Now I have read about transplant shock, but generally, the examples I have seen of transplant shock involve more mature plants (several weeks old).

So far, two of my seedlings have "wilted" (they're so small that it is more accurate to say their stems do not stand up and are on the ground. Is it possible that these seedlings are experiencing the same "shock"?
 

deluxestogie

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They are more likely toast. In transferring tiny seedlings, I use forceps to grasp the soil beneath the seedling, rather than the seedling itself. Once the stalks have a bit of meat on them, then you can handle them directly.

Bob
 

desert_pioneer

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They are more likely toast. In transferring tiny seedlings, I use forceps to grasp the soil beneath the seedling, rather than the seedling itself. Once the stalks have a bit of meat on them, then you can handle them directly.

Bob
oof, that's too bad :(

I have many more germinated seeds than I can fit outside when they are fully grown, but I feel saddened at the untimely death of my sprouts haha

Do you think using a toothpick to slightly upturn the soil around the seedling and then taking a grasp of the seedling (pulling with it a small clump of dirt around the root) is a somewhat okay way of going about transplanting them? (I ask cause that is what i have been doing before today)

Nevertheless, I may use tweezers, similar to your forceps.
 
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