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Deluxestogie Grow Log 2021

Yug

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Sep 5, 2021
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I’d say time is categorical (to use the word technically, philosophically) and the clock is the construct. Being requires an existential relation to the experience of time, but not to technical time, the time told by a clock. @Yug described it well above. Or Being=time and time=Being, to paraphrase Heidegger. Or maybe I’m just being overly pedantic…
No, not too pedantic, just cultured. My references are certainly less known, it was a French actor (Gérard Depardieu) who said something that stuck with me. I don't remember it exactly, but here is the interpretation I got from it: "What does the past matter, it's over. The future? I don't know, we'll see. What matters is to live in the moment. The present moment, when you live it, is eternity. "
 

JMorgan

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The time on the clock is a construct, yes but is made to make our lives easier to manage. It is a common agreement like currency, which makes life easier.

It should probably be kept simple though or, as we have seen it can get to be a pain. Certainly @deluxestogie 's post about driving through four time zones, and more so the part about turning the clocks the wrong way was a good laugh. Very relatable.

My first boss was an alcoholic, and if anyone ever looked at him funny for opening a can of beer he would say sincerely to them 'it's 5:00 somewhere in the world right now', and get on with his life. Now where would he be with no time zones?
 

Oldfella

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Sorry Bob, it looks like your log has been hijacked again and it's all my fault. I have forgotten about time, I chucked my watch in the drawer the day I retired, so time is not relivent to me. I miss an appointment, oh dear,how sad,never mind. The only thing that is important is my baccy cure, and that's in hours and days and months. But there is no need to be at a specific time, any old time will work.
Oldfella
 

deluxestogie

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hijacked again
Passing time? Spending time? Wasting time? Having time? Using time? Taking time? Just in time!

Despite my chronologic status, the local stores refuse to open their doors to me, unless I arrive during their specified "open" hours. And all the pills that keep me appearing to be among the living demand a schedule.

For over a half-century, I have aggressively pursued an understanding of time itself. I have read through shelf-feet of books on the subject: philosophy, popular conjecture, theoretical physics, astrophysics. Learned folks have laughed at my "wasting time" on such an amorphous and pointless subject. While I have not yet found the time to solidify my thoughts on the subject, my impression is that time, like solidity, is only apparent. It's all we can relate to, but is nonetheless not what we envision it to be.

Bob
 

Oldfella

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@deluxestogie said, Despite my chronologic status, the local stores refuse to open their doors to me, unless I arrive during their specified "open" hours. And all the pills that keep me appearing to be among the living demand a schedule.

You are correct of course. 0600. take pills. 1200, take keep going pills. 1800 even more pills.
Dr appointment, X hours. Y day.
Can't win, we're stuck with it. I guess that the older we get the less important time becomes.
Oldfella
 

deluxestogie

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Similar experiences, yet a different count of significant events.

In 1963, I hiked for 7 days with a group of scouts, along the Appalachian Trail (AT), from the Delaware Water Gap, over the high balds of northern New Jersey, to High Point State Park. To this day, I can recall nearly hour by hour (sometimes minute by minute) that entire trip in cinematic detail. Thirty-five years later, I hiked for 10 days with my eldest brother, along the AT from near Irwin, Tennessee to Damascus, Virginia. The trail there passes through terrain dramatically different from that of northern New Jersey. Although I do have some wonderfully clear recollections of it directly from the experience, I can recall it now mostly from the photos that the two of us captured, and the trail log that I updated once or twice a day. On both hikes, I came across a rattlesnake in the middle of the trail. Only one was the first rattler that I had ever seen. Between those two hikes, I had enjoyed numerous AT hikes, each on a different section of the trail.

My internal measure of the passage of time depends on the ticks of significant (read, "new") events that I experience. That first AT hike provided a bounty of numerous ticks per hour--a count rate that diminished with each subsequent hike in new areas. The older I become, the lower the count of events that rank as significant. Instead of thousands or hundreds or tens of new experiences per day, the count sometimes sags to one new experience per month or two. So the clocks and the calendars become discordant with my sense of the passage of time.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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We've had a number of nights of hard freeze, and no precipitation for over a week. Looking out my study window at the random, standing suckers of Corojo 99, I saw what appeared to be many dozens of moderately large leaves that appeared to have freeze/sun-cured to a light brown, and held well off the ground. With the temp 60°F today, I walked out there to have a look.

On closer inspection, nearly every leaf revealed at least one reason or another for rejecting it as potential Cavendish: mold, persistent green, etc. I'll look once more tomorrow afternoon, since rain is predicted for 2 days from now. But my impression is that none of it would be worth the time of fussing with it.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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Frozen Suckers for Cavendish

Garden20211111_6109_frozenSuckers_600.jpg


From a distance, this looks like a bounty of potentially useable leaf for making Cavendish.

Garden20211111_6110_frozenSuckers_closeup_600.jpg


A closer inspection reveals that nearly every leaf has serious issues: decay, persistent green, etc. I got down on my knees, and examined every marginally promising leaf, then plucked those that would not require manicuring prior to use. What I ended up with, from the entire garden, irrespective of variety, was a handful of thin, floppy leaves--maybe 20 to 24 of them. I will allow them to dry down a bit, to more easily stem them, then I will cook them into Cavendish ice cream.

Garden20211111_6111_frozenSuckerLeaf_600.jpg


Bob
 

new boy

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norfolk
Frozen Suckers for Cavendish

Garden20211111_6109_frozenSuckers_600.jpg


From a distance, this looks like a bounty of potentially useable leaf for making Cavendish.

Garden20211111_6110_frozenSuckers_closeup_600.jpg


A closer inspection reveals that nearly every leaf has serious issues: decay, persistent green, etc. I got down on my knees, and examined every marginally promising leaf, then plucked those that would not require manicuring prior to use. What I ended up with, from the entire garden, irrespective of variety, was a handful of thin, floppy leaves--maybe 20 to 24 of them. I will allow them to dry down a bit, to more easily stem them, then I will cook them into Cavendish ice cream.

Garden20211111_6111_frozenSuckerLeaf_600.jpg


Bob
Cavendish ice cream ?
 

deluxestogie

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Frozen leaf. Must be ice cream. Was glistening like ice cream when I primed it. At the moment its appearance belies its aroma.

Seriously, the now mostly dry, frog-legged, frozen sucker leaf smells like newly mowed, stinky weeds. I'm considering kilning it prior to cooking it. This sort of leaf is really labor-intensive, and not encouraging. But my mind is still open to the possibility that it may make useable Cavendish. I suppose that's better than nothing, if you've got nothing better to do with your time.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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My stinky, frozen suckers spent a mere two weeks in my kiln. Today, they smell wonderful, and are certainly ready to be cooked to Cavendish. (Why only two weeks? Because my two month kiln run ended today. End of the line. Everybody off!)

Garden20211128_6128_frozenSuckers_afterKiln_500.jpg


Years ago, maybe in 2014, I purchased 10 pounds (I believe) of burley red tips from @BigBonner. I seem to recall that it was already "old burley" at that time. It had been baled, like all commercial burley, but had not subsequently been made more "photogenic" by bringing it into case, and flattening the individual leaves. I've used portions of that lot from time to time, but had never gotten around to kilning it.

Now, I realize that most people on planet Earth do not kiln their burley prior to use. [That explains the toasting and casings and the frequent forum questions about how to make burley "smoother".] You don't "need" to kiln it in order to use it. My simple answer as to how to make burley smoother is either patience or kilning. Kilning has no impact on the nicotine or the characteristic aroma of burley. It just makes it older and wiser faster.

I decided that despite its respectable age, I would finally just kiln the entire lot of it. These burley red tips have always been quite nice, right from the start. Now, they are even smoother. I think I have about 5 pounds of it. They have been kilned 2 months inside a very large, open bag inside my kiln.

Garden20211128_6127_oldBBBurleyTips_kilned_700.jpg


Burley red tips are from the upper portion of the tobacco stalk, and naturally color-cure to a darker brown than burley from lower down the stalk. The red tips are stronger (nicotine) and more flavorful. I love them.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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Yesterday, I cooked 3 batches of Cavendish (at the same time). Leaf was sprayed with distilled water as I packed it. The 3 jars were sealed, and cooked in a boiling water bath for about 9 hours.

Today, I spread one of them to dry:

Garden20211130_6131_OneSuckerCavendish_drying_700a.jpg


This One Sucker was the last I had. It has been excellent as shipped, and has also made excellent Cavendish. I expect the color to shift to less of a black and more of a dark brown as it dries.

The other 2 batches were all my frozen suckers, and a portion of @BigBonner's "Old" Burley Red Tips, both of which came out of the kiln just the other day.

Garden20211130_6132_CavendishInvertedJars_600.jpg


Once I've removed the jars from the processing bath, I like to stand them upside down. (Removing the rims confirms a good seal on the lid.) Since at this point, there is usually more moisture in the bottom of the jar than the top, inversion allows the moisture to distribute more evenly.

As you can see above, all the leaf is wet. But as you can see below, it is not so wet that any liquid drips down onto the white enamel of the lid lining.

Garden20211130_6132_CavendishInvertedJars_closeup_600.jpg


Both of these should dry to a darker color than what you see, as the nicotine oxidizes. Rather than having drying Cavendish strewn about everywhere, I prefer to dry one jar of leaf at a time, while the others remain unopened (sterilized).

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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I've found that setting up the huge pot of water, and watching it all day long is the biggest pain in the butt (frequently checking the water level, and adding more boiling water if it gets low). So, the more jars (varieties) that I process at the same time, the less work it is per variety. Quart jars are too tall for small pots. The pot I used held three 1-quart jars of tobacco, two 1-quart jars of water, and one 1-pint jar of water--to keep it all stable. I should have also done a jar of flue-cured bright leaf, and a jar of sun-cured Oriental, but I was feeling lazy. I've got Maryland 609 hanging in the shed from my 2021 crop. That also makes a wonderful Cavendish.

Once the frog-legged Cavendish leaves have dried, they will be bagged as-is in 1-gallon Ziploc bags, ready for on-demand shredding and blending.

Bob
 
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