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Deluxestogie Grow Log 2022

deluxestogie

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Two more of my Piloto Cubano pics that I just dredged up.

Garden20180726_3702_Bob_PilotoCubano_bed_700.jpg

2018

Garden20190806_4595_Piloto_bed_Bob_700.jpg

2019

The fun never stops.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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I find fireflies difficult to photograph. The eye sees a multi-second wave of flashes. But a camera shot (even a relatively slow exposure) gets only a slice of that display.

Garden20220712_6543-5composite_Fireflies_700.jpg


I cheated here. The camera was mounted. I set it to count to 10, then snap 3 long-exposure shots at 2 second intervals between. Then I used Photoshop to combine them. It's still not that great.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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Garden20220713_6549_MachuPicchu_blossom_600.jpg

Machu Picchu Havana blossom (Pi 116159), taken this morning.

In 1936, when Raymond Stadelman (Agricultural Explorer for the USDA) traveled to Machu Picchu by train, he was met at his destination by Carlos Duque, who had been the assistant of Hiram Bingham during the opening up of the Machu Picchu ruins in 1911-1915. There, he identified a tobacco said to have "white blossoms". He subsequently found, in Cuzco, a quite different tobacco said to have "white flowers," that appeared to be an Oriental type.

MachuPicchu_Stadelman_originalAccessionDoc.JPG

Original accession document from ARS-GRIN.

In a personal letter to "Mr. Morrison", accompanying the seed submission to USDA, Stadelman says that the "white blossom" variety, found on Machu Picchu, was referred to by locals as "Havana".

MachuPicchu_letterExcerpt.JPG


This (Pi 116159) is the "Machu Picchu Havana" that I have grown for the past decade. The name is from me. It has always displayed pink, rather than white blossoms. I attribute this difference to the dramatic difference in geographic elevation.

Northwood Seeds currently offers a "White Flower" (Pi 116162) that is an Oriental type (similar in appearance to Samsun, with a fringed petiole), and which I have not grown.

White_Flower_5.jpg

Northwood Seeds' "White Flower" (Pi 116162) Oriental, which I suggest should be renamed, "White Flower Cusco," for clarity.

It is not particularly unusual for the ARS-GRIN listings to introduce ambiguity, and occasionally error in their naming and market class assignment. Here, we have two accessions submitted at the same time (1936), with similar names—both from Peru. One (the Havana type) is from Machu Picchu, while the other (a Samsun-like Oriental type) is from nearby Cusco, Peru.

Bob
 

GreenDragon

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I have two hummingbird feeders and many flowering plants that the hummers love. Lately I’ve enjoyed watching them in the afternoons fighting for ownership of the yard - hummers are territorial. Currently there are four in competition (3 females and one male). As I watch their aerial skirmishes I cannot help but superimpose the sounds of laser fire and engines from Star Wars! Sometimes I whisper in my best Darth Vader voice “I have you now!”
 

deluxestogie

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Local Drama Club
This morning, a bunny munched on the grass a few feet from my porch. I spoke nonsense to it. With surprising suddenness, it scooted about 12 inches closer, then froze.

Nearly simultaneous with that, a Sharp Shinned Hawk emerged from the left (speeding up the grassy driveway), zoomed into my view a couple of yards from my face, and past the bunny, missing it by that same 12 inches. Clever bunny! [Pretend to be an oblivious, sitting duck, until the last second.]

A Sharp Shinned Hawk is a medium-size hawk, when viewed perched on a branch. But when it gets up close, it takes on more of a serving platter (roasted please) size.

In the past, I've asked this same hawk (or maybe its partner) to concentrate on the rodents, and go easy on the lagomorphs. It doesn't listen.

Bob
 

HillDweller

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Local Drama Club
This morning, a bunny munched on the grass a few feet from my porch. I spoke nonsense to it. With surprising suddenness, it scooted about 12 inches closer, then froze.

Nearly simultaneous with that, a Sharp Shinned Hawk emerged from the left (speeding up the grassy driveway), zoomed into my view a couple of yards from my face, and past the bunny, missing it by that same 12 inches. Clever bunny! [Pretend to be an oblivious, sitting duck, until the last second.]

A Sharp Shinned Hawk is a medium-size hawk, when viewed perched on a branch. But when it gets up close, it takes on more of a serving platter (roasted please) size.

In the past, I've asked this same hawk (or maybe its partner) to concentrate on the rodents, and go easy on the lagomorphs. It doesn't listen.

Bob
Tons of rabbits around here this year. They sure do love beans. Anyways, about a month ago I was in the back yard and saw a Red-tail sitting in the lawn down the hill a little ways. He just sat there and sat there. Then with a bit of struggle he took off clutching a bunny, gained altitude and away he went.
 

skychaser

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I suggest should be renamed, "White Flower Cusco," for clarity.
Put that on your list of things for me to change. Jessica told me when I got the seed that I probably wouldn't be very impressed by it. She was right. Very small plants with a very low yield. But the flowers were white. It doesn't produce like Samsun (aka Black Sea Samsun) or like Samsun Maden. I don't think I ever smoked any of the White Flower. Those leaves in the pict are probably still hanging in my barn.

Bob, Have you ever grown Samsun Maden? If so, what did you think of it? I grew a few once before and liked it better than the BSS strain. I like both, but I thought the Maden was a better. It made a really good stand alone cigarette. I have a full section of it growing this year. They are looking great! 4' tall now and growing inches per day. A few have started budding already and got bagged today. Should be a good seed harvest coming. Bagged a couple Harmanli too.
 

skychaser

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Northwood Seeds does not list Samsun-Maden. If you recall, as I'm sure you must, my 2013 grow log, I did grow Samsun-Maden.

Garden20120613_236_SamsunMaden_300a.jpg


Bob
2013? I barely remember Tuesday. When I grew Samsun Maden before I had very few plants and got very little seed that year. Not enough to list it. This year is looking much better. I have 40 nice looking plants and am happy to see them start blooming already. For me, this is early.
 

deluxestogie

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Height in bed vs. potted

Standard for tobacco plant height measurement is from the ground surface up to the bottom of the crowfoot.

Garden20220715_6565_MachuPicchu_bed_height_600.jpg


I have never measured the volume of this pot, but I believe it is about 3 gallons

Garden20220715_6563_MachuPicchu_potted_height_344.jpg


The two measurements are nearly identical. The leaves on the potted plant are thinner, and slightly shorter and narrower. But the potted one promises to provide some nice leaf, as well as a chance to photograph a hummingbird visit.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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Relaxing Retirement

This morning, before my coffee, I went out to the shed, and stripped all the remaining tobacco: 3 large, overstuffed bags from the hanging stalks (Corojo 99), and 3 smaller bags of strung leaf. Whew!

We had a thunderstorm pass through late yesterday afternoon. While sitting out on my porch two hours later, I heard a loud crash. I walked around the front of the house, in the fading light of dusk, and saw that the huge maple branch scheduled to land on my bedroom had missed its mark, and, in fact, had missed everything. It just dropped a 25-foot long hunk onto the yard. It was too dark to go back out with the camera, so I waited until morning.

First thing this morning, I noticed that a 15-foot long branch (~4" thick at the base) had dropped during the night from a different maple tree in the back yard. [I suppose the conservative vs. liberal members of each maple tree had to bicker for hours after the storm had already passed, in order to decide whether or not it had been a severe enough storm to bring down branches.]

The back yard branch:

Garden20220719_6567_fallenBranch_back_700.jpg


The front yard branch:

Garden20220719_6568_fallenBranchFront01_700.jpg


Garden20220719_6572_fallenBranchFront02_700.jpg


Garden20220719_6569_fallenBranchFront03_700a.jpg


Garden20220719_6570_fallenBranchFront04_700.jpg


Garden20220719_6571_fallenBranchFront05_trunk_700.jpg


Bob
 
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