Whole Leaf Tobacco

Does anyone have a nicotine strength chart for the different varieties commonly used

deluxestogie

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If you go to the ARS-GRIN germplasm database, and enter "Nicotiana tabacum" into the search box, you will get over 2000 accessions.


If the search term also includes a varietal name, it may find that. Clicking on an accession leads to a page about it, sometimes with a photo. At the bottom of that page there may (or may not) be a link to "Detailed Accession Observation Page", that would include some specifics about that variety, and may include nicotine concentration. If you should stumble into such a number, take it with a grain of salt. It is highly precise for that leaf from that stalk level of that specific variety for that specific grow during a specific season in a specific climate on a specific farm.

What I'm saying is that many variables dramatically affect the nicotine concentration of the leaf. For your own blending, you can pretty much use this table:

low nicotineMost Orientals
moderate nicotineMost flue-cured
high nicotinePerique, Dark-Air, Burley, most cigar types
very high nicotineNicotiana rustica

In addition, leaf from lower on the stalk has less nicotine. The nicotine increases as you work toward the top of the stalk.

Perhaps more to your underlying question, is how much of the available nicotine you will be absorbing. If you inhale into your (gasp!) lungs, then you get a high percentage of whatever is in the smoke. If you puff it without inhaling (as with a pipe or cigar), the the pH of the smoke will be a greater determinant. The membranes of the mouth and oropharynx and nose absorb nicotine that is in more alkaline smoke (higher pH), whereas more acidic smoke (lower pH) is poorly absorbed. With smokeless, the pH of the actual leaf preparation determines its nicotine absorption.

lower pH of smoke (acidic)Orientals, flue-cured
higher pH of smoke (alkaline)pretty much everything else

Cigarette blends tend to produce smoke that is more acidic (lower pH).
Cigars, pipe blends tend to produce smoke that is more alkaline (higher pH).
Alkali (some manner of alkaline salt) is intentionally added to most smokeless recipes to increase nicotine absorption.

Sorry, no chart of varieties vs. nicotine.

Bob
 

burge

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Where the leaf comes from the plant determines its nicotine strength. Bottom with less top with more.
 

Jitterbugdude

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But.... If aliens were to land and I absolutely had to give them a list in order to save humanity I would say:
Rustica is the strongest, followed by Burley ( tied with Fire cured), then Cigar, then Flue- cured then Turkish followed by Maryland.

Disaster averted!
 

Charly

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I thought Maryland had more nicotine than orientals or flue cured.
But I have not smoked some for a very long time.... (and the one I tried to grow two years ago did not grow well...)
 

deluxestogie

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My experience with Maryland tobacco includes the two varieties that I grew myself (Catterton and Keller), which were mild, and Maryland 609, which I find to be rather potent in nicotine. In terms of flavor and aroma, I think that all three of those are subdued and neutral.

Bob
 
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