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Fermentation Culture Recipe

Tobaccofieldsforever

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Joined
Apr 12, 2021
Messages
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Location
Ravenna, Ohio
I have little to no experience with fermentation/sweating yet (that will change in the months to follow), but I came across this recipe in the book I'm reading (Growing and Processing Tobacco at Home, A Guide for Gardeners , 2002, Jim Johnson) and found it interesting and was wondering if anyone has ever tried anything similar to this:
"The culture should be prepared in a non-metal container using the following ingredients and amounts:
Distilled water-1 imperial gallon (4.5 liters)
Citric acid-1 spoonful
Glucose- 1.5lb. (0.2kg)
Protein (essence beef or chicken)- 1 spoonful
To this add a little highly fermented tobacco, (perique/cavendish/latakia/imported havana cigar or American chewing tobacco), raise temperature to 120F (49C), keep at this temperature until fermentation is active. This may be diluted down with distilled water to the quantity required and then sprayed throughout the tobacco before it is put into the kiln. It is very hard to obtain tobacco leaf which is not pasteurized by heat treatment but the above offer the best chance." (Johnson, 2002, p.58) (I'm not sure what is meant by 1 spoonful, teaspoon or tablespoon? The author of this particular recipe is english if that helps clarify at all...)

I was also wondering, is fermentation a process that should be done to ALL tobacco that is grown? I thought a kiln was a way to "force age" tobacco, this is different from fermenting right?? I read some threads on here about some tobaccos not being as good as they could be after coming out of the kiln and needing to sit and "age" for sometimes over a year until they are at their prime...so why not just leave the tobacco in the kiln if it is supposed to replicate the aging process?? Just a few things I'm confused about. Any information would be much appreciated thank you!!
 
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Spike_Indiana

Member
Joined
May 11, 2021
Messages
20
Points
3
Location
Indiana
I have little to no experience with fermentation/sweating yet (that will change in the months to follow), but I came across this recipe in the book I'm reading (Growing and Processing Tobacco at Home, A Guide for Gardeners , 2002, Jim Johnson) and found it interesting and was wondering if anyone has ever tried anything similar to this:
"The culture should be prepared in a non-metal container using the following ingredients and amounts:
Distilled water-1 imperial gallon (4.5 liters)
Citric acid-1 spoonful
Glucose- 1.5lb. (0.2kg)
Protein (essence beef or chicken)- 1 spoonful
To this add a little highly fermented tobacco, (perique/cavendish/latakia/imported havana cigar or American chewing tobacco), raise temperature to 120F (49C), keep at this temperature until fermentation is active. This may be diluted down with distilled water to the quantity required and then sprayed throughout the tobacco before it is put into the kiln. It is very hard to obtain tobacco leaf which is not pasteurized by heat treatment but the above offer the best chance." (Johnson, 2002, p.58) (I'm not sure what is meant by 1 spoonful, teaspoon or tablespoon? The author of this particular recipe is english if that helps clarify at all...)

I was also wondering, is fermentation a process that should be done to ALL tobacco that is grown? I thought a kiln was a way to "force age" tobacco, this is different from fermenting right?? I read some threads on here about some tobaccos not being as good as they could be after coming out of the kiln and needing to sit and "age" for sometimes over a year until they are at their prime...so why not just leave the tobacco in the kiln if it is supposed to replicate the aging process?? Just a few things I'm confused about. Any information would be much appreciated thank you!!
Common spoon is a teaspoon especially in England if that helps
 

Spike_Indiana

Member
Joined
May 11, 2021
Messages
20
Points
3
Location
Indiana
I have little to no experience with fermentation/sweating yet (that will change in the months to follow), but I came across this recipe in the book I'm reading (Growing and Processing Tobacco at Home, A Guide for Gardeners , 2002, Jim Johnson) and found it interesting and was wondering if anyone has ever tried anything similar to this:
"The culture should be prepared in a non-metal container using the following ingredients and amounts:
Distilled water-1 imperial gallon (4.5 liters)
Citric acid-1 spoonful
Glucose- 1.5lb. (0.2kg)
Protein (essence beef or chicken)- 1 spoonful
To this add a little highly fermented tobacco, (perique/cavendish/latakia/imported havana cigar or American chewing tobacco), raise temperature to 120F (49C), keep at this temperature until fermentation is active. This may be diluted down with distilled water to the quantity required and then sprayed throughout the tobacco before it is put into the kiln. It is very hard to obtain tobacco leaf which is not pasteurized by heat treatment but the above offer the best chance." (Johnson, 2002, p.58) (I'm not sure what is meant by 1 spoonful, teaspoon or tablespoon? The author of this particular recipe is english if that helps clarify at all...)

I was also wondering, is fermentation a process that should be done to ALL tobacco that is grown? I thought a kiln was a way to "force age" tobacco, this is different from fermenting right?? I read some threads on here about some tobaccos not being as good as they could be after coming out of the kiln and needing to sit and "age" for sometimes over a year until they are at their prime...so why not just leave the tobacco in the kiln if it is supposed to replicate the aging process?? Just a few things I'm confused about. Any information would be much appreciated thank you!!
I’m still learning but from my research after kilning some tobacco needs to air out/age to release ammonia that is produced during fermentation and as in wine the longer the micro organisms are active in the plant the better it will be. Age adds smoothness in alcohol or cigars I do know that while killing speeds up fermentation I don’t believe it produces the same results as natural aging in humidity of 65-75% at 60-70 degrees Fahrenheit if my research and understanding is correct still waiting to start my first grow hopefully soon.
 
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