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Fermenting in jars

deluxestogie

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50°C does not kill mold. It simply prevents vegetative growth. I set my kiln to run between 122°F and 128°F (50°C and 53.3°C), so that it avoids any mold growth. A 3 day average of °50C would mean that it is hovering in the range of vegetative mold growth half the time. What I'm saying is that it should be kept above 50°C.

I'm not a mycologist, and can't offer any greater detail about the issue. I suppose you could just sacrifice some leaf, and give it a try for a couple of months.

Bob
 

deluxestogie

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That method would work, maybe.

Problems:
  • At 50°C (122°F), the tobacco is right at the top of the temperature zone in which mold can grow—the tobacco might mold if the oven temp is off by a degree.
  • I ferment my tobacco for 2 months, and even then, some of it needs to age further for months.
  • The oven method monopolizes your oven for the duration.
  • You can only do tiny quantities at a time.
Bob
 

baccy

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Thank you for responding. I have a second oven in the summer kitchen-bbq area I could use. And it's an old school oven made in late 80s, so it should endure working non stop for a week lol. I guess won't be an issue to set it a bit above than 50 C. I can't afford to build a good quality kiln now. I made a simple one last year, a small box from insulation fibran with a wire light bulb in it. It was maintaing 50 + degrees C but since there was no humidity source I was opening every few hours and spray the leafs. The result after one month was very unique smooth aroma and taste but the leafs became so curley that was impossible to flaten and shred. Also when I forgot sometimes to open and spray they got toasted so it was very light smoking despite the good taste. I will post a pictures of this box next days to see if it could be improved for cheap. Maybe I can place a crockpot in it.
 

Alpine

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An old no longer working fridge or freezer can be converted in a useful kiln by simply adding a crockpot and a cheap temp controller. Ask your neighbors, probably someone will be very happy to get rid of an old fridge for free. A kiln doesn’t need to be complicated: if a container of some sort can maintain adequate temp and humidity, then you can use it and call it “a kiln”. Of course, the better the sealing and insulation, the less hassle for you to keep it working properly, and less energy to keep the temp consistent.

pier


pier
 
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