Whole Leaf Tobacco

Flue curing encouragement

ChinaVoodoo

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Building a flue-cure chamber is far less work than growing even a tiny crop of tobacco.

Bob
Yes, wholeheartedly agree, Bob.

I've seen a bit of this sentiment lately--that flue curing is for the "advanced" grower--and it tends to come from people who to my knowledge have not flue cured.

We all have specialized skills that others have said they couldn't do, but we know they can and that all that's holding them back is self-doubt.

Flue curing requires a moderate amount of money, or ingenuity, a modest understanding of insulation, and fire safety, and a decent ability to follow instructions.

In my climate, wholeheartedly, growing is the hardest part, and varies significantly year to year. Flue curing, mind you is the one thing I know was worth it to learn, and is fairly consistent.

(don't look here for instructions. Check the Key forum threads)
 

MRM

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I will be doing my first grow this year.
I will grow Virginia and maybe a couple of prilep.

I have read most everything on here concerning building a flue cure chamber and using it.
Here is my take:

There is a ton of info on here !
The blueprint has been laid out (apparently very successfully) by some pioneers and all one needs to do is follow directions.

I have my seeds on hand, just waiting on mid February. I have started prepping the ground and will have a soil analysis very soon (county extension office).

I haven't started a chamber yet. Im trying to decide whether to build one or use an old deep freezer. I'm leaning towards building just need to determine the proper size.

I am planning for 75 - 100 plants.
I've grown lots of peas and beans before so I am accustomed to the labor and commitment. I have some learning to do on growing tobacco and I think I am in the perfect place for that.

I am very good at following directions and have never felt the need to reinvent what is working well. I am very accustomed to working off of blueprints.

It is a small investment, but one I feel will have a healthy return and lots of learning, enjoyment, work and sense of accomplishment.

This is sure to be loads of fun and I am so happy I found this forum and the guys that occupy it.

With that said - let me add a hardy Thank You to all you guys paving the way, sharing info and making this possible for the average Joe tobacco lover.
 

ChinaVoodoo

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Flue curing actually increases your yield. During air curing, and the necessary fermentation, tobacco loses a significant amount of mass via carbohydrates turning into carbon dioxide. This only happens to a small degree with flue cured tobacco.
 
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