Whole Leaf Tobacco

Full Turkish blends?

Status
Not open for further replies.

Jpcouling

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2014
Messages
155
Points
0
Location
Brighton, Michigan
Hello to all my fellow growers and tobacco lovers!

I am interested to know if anyone on this forum enjoys the taste and aroma of a fully Turkish blend for a cigarette? I have yet to try any homegrown Oriental or Turkish tobaccos either, any suggestions for who's or what I should try?
 

DGBAMA

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2013
Messages
4,418
Points
63
Location
NORTH ALABAMA
For just flavor and aroma, the Turkish Izmir I grew last year is a definite stand-alone favorite. Turkish/Oriental varieties are lower in Nicotine, so for full satisfaction you may need to blend with something that has more kick.
 

Knucklehead

Moderator
Founding Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
10,345
Points
113
Location
NE Alabama
I tried a full Turkish commercial blend that seemed rather light to me, although the taste was wonderful. Istanbulin smokes alot of full Turkish blends and loves them. He recommends a blend of 30% Kozluk or Mutki, 20% Izmir, 20% Adiyaman, 20% Trabzon, 10% Canik. You'll have to gather up the seed for all these and grow them yourself.

Don sells two Turkish whole leaf blends here: http://www.wholeleaftobacco.com/Whole-Leaf-Cigarette-Blends_c17.htm
The Yedi Turkish American and the Turkish light blends.
 

Jpcouling

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2014
Messages
155
Points
0
Location
Brighton, Michigan
Thanks to the both of you! I have a question about how the Turkish tobacco develops, maybe it would fare better in Science, but I will post it here out of sheer laziness. I have read that a prime reason for Oriental tobaccos developing their distinct aroma is due to the plant's adaptive processes of withstanding desert heat. More of these aromatic compounds are produced as a wax or coating to preserve the moisture of the plant. Does this sound correct? Does anyone have any articles or information on this to share?
 

Knucklehead

Moderator
Founding Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
10,345
Points
113
Location
NE Alabama
Thanks to the both of you! I have a question about how the Turkish tobacco develops, maybe it would fare better in Science, but I will post it here out of sheer laziness. I have read that a prime reason for Oriental tobaccos developing their distinct aroma is due to the plant's adaptive processes of withstanding desert heat. More of these aromatic compounds are produced as a wax or coating to preserve the moisture of the plant. Does this sound correct? Does anyone have any articles or information on this to share?
I would have to discount the above statement due to the fact that myself and several growers in the states find their oriental varieties to also have the unique Oriental aroma and flavor. Standard American wide spacing as well as traditional close Turkish spacing have both been tried. Not much desert here in Alabama and I'm extremely satisfied with the orientals I grew at traditional Turkish close spacing, no additional fertilizer, no watering and no topping.
 

istanbulin

Moderator
Founding Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2012
Messages
1,290
Points
66
Location
Stockton, CA
... I have read that a prime reason for Oriental tobaccos developing their distinct aroma is due to the plant's adaptive processes of withstanding desert heat. More of these aromatic compounds are produced as a wax or coating to preserve the moisture of the plant. Does this sound correct? Does anyone have any articles or information on this to share?
None of the tobacco varieties can withstand desert conditions. Yes, resinous formations on the leaf help to keep water in. So, it sounds half correct. There're too many posts about Oriental tobacco in the forum.
 

DGBAMA

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2013
Messages
4,418
Points
63
Location
NORTH ALABAMA
None of the tobacco varieties can withstand desert conditions. Yes, resinous formations on the leaf help to keep water in. So, it sounds half correct. There're too many posts about Oriental tobacco in the forum.
No such thing as too much information.............it just becomes a little more work to decipher the good from the bad.
 

Knucklehead

Moderator
Founding Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
10,345
Points
113
Location
NE Alabama

Jpcouling

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2014
Messages
155
Points
0
Location
Brighton, Michigan
Thanks Knucklehead, that is worth reading just for the nostalgic element! So perhaps the Oriental varieties are just naturally higher in these special aromatic esters? Are they esters?
 

Knucklehead

Moderator
Founding Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
10,345
Points
113
Location
NE Alabama
We have some members with Dr. or Professor in front of their name, and PhD or MD after it. I'm standing aside for one of them to show up when you start talking chemicals and compounds. "It taste good" or "I couldn't finish the damn nasty thing" are about as technical as I can get. :rolleyes:
 

DonH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2012
Messages
1,609
Points
0
Location
Massachusetts
Yes, every now and the I like a 100% Turkish blend. I just mix equal proportions of all the Turkish varieties I have and it comes out pretty good. As for growing it in the US, all I can say is that I really like the Turkish types I grow in Massachusetts and I like it a lot better than Peter Stokkebye's Turkish blend. I taste more aromatic compounds in mine.
 

DonH

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 10, 2012
Messages
1,609
Points
0
Location
Massachusetts
Another Turkish blend that I like is to take my 100% Turkish blend and mix it 1:1 with Flue Cured Virginia. You can also make a standard American blend but triple the amount of Turkish in it.
 

FmGrowit

Head Honcho
Staff member
Joined
May 17, 2011
Messages
5,196
Points
113
Location
Freedom, Ohio, United States
Turkish/Oriental tobaccos have taken centuries to develop. If you grow "Turkish" tobacco here in the States from seeds collected year after year, the variety will no longer be true and eventually lose all characteristics that make it "Turkish.
 

Knucklehead

Moderator
Founding Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
10,345
Points
113
Location
NE Alabama
Turkish/Oriental tobaccos have taken centuries to develop. If you grow "Turkish" tobacco here in the States from seeds collected year after year, the variety will no longer be true and eventually lose all characteristics that make it "Turkish.
How do we keep Turkish varieties true here in the States? I thought they had already gone past the point of returning to their parent plant state.
 

FmGrowit

Head Honcho
Staff member
Joined
May 17, 2011
Messages
5,196
Points
113
Location
Freedom, Ohio, United States
In as little as two years, a tobacco variety can morph into a different variety. The more times the cycle occurs, the further removed the variety becomes.

So a better seed collection practice would be to grow a single years seeds for as long as the seeds are viable...then refresh the supply. Seeds should remain viable for 15-20 years or longer.

Planting seeds from consecutive seasons is exactly how Turkish/Oriental tobaccos were developed. The seeds originated in the Americas and after 500 years of morphing, have become there own type of tobacco.
 

Knucklehead

Moderator
Founding Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2012
Messages
10,345
Points
113
Location
NE Alabama
In as little as two years, a tobacco variety can morph into a different variety. The more times the cycle occurs, the further removed the variety becomes.

So a better seed collection practice would be to grow a single years seeds for as long as the seeds are viable...then refresh the supply. Seeds should remain viable for 15-20 years or longer.

Planting seeds from consecutive seasons is exactly how Turkish/Oriental tobaccos were developed. The seeds originated in the Americas and after 500 years of morphing, have become there own type of tobacco.
And the replacement seed will need to come from overseas once the changes have occurred in seed over here?
 

Jpcouling

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2014
Messages
155
Points
0
Location
Brighton, Michigan
In as little as two years, a tobacco variety can morph into a different variety. The more times the cycle occurs, the further removed the variety becomes.

So a better seed collection practice would be to grow a single years seeds for as long as the seeds are viable...then refresh the supply. Seeds should remain viable for 15-20 years or longer.

Planting seeds from consecutive seasons is exactly how Turkish/Oriental tobaccos were developed. The seeds originated in the Americas and after 500 years of morphing, have become there own type of tobacco.
So it will naturally morph in to another distinctive or new variety. Well wouldn't this mean that almost any tobacco you grow consecutively will soon enough become its own variety?
 

FmGrowit

Head Honcho
Staff member
Joined
May 17, 2011
Messages
5,196
Points
113
Location
Freedom, Ohio, United States
That would be the best way to assure you're growing as true to form plants as possible. Refreshing seeds every year accelerates the transitioning process.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top