Whole Leaf Tobacco

Gabeb123's 2021 grow

ChinaVoodoo

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I still think you guys should be hesitant to speak conclusively about this factor for those of us who's ground temperatures lag significantly behind yours. If I compare years, my yield is significantly affected by growing season length, and it follows that larger seedlings with more roots would be beneficial. My smaller plants added to replace blow downs and cut worm casualties don't seem to catch up to the original planting. Also, if seedling size is irrelevant, why start indoors at all? Why the 6 week rule of thumb?

I don't think it's necessary, but I haven't seen enough evidence to conclude that potting up has no effect, at least for me. And, Minnesota may be more like Alberta than like VA and AL - - I Iived on the Lake of the Woods - - and I wouldn't rule out potting up until more study has been performed.
 

Gabeb123

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Maybe I will have to do an experiment and up pot a couple of each variety. I am worried that they will get root bound in those cells.

I planted them beginning March which was probably too early. I had a bad case of spring allergies and was afraid it was covid. I figured I better get them planted in case I'm out of commission for a few weeks.

I will be able to plant them in the ground early-mid May but I'm thinking I can start acclimating them to the green house today and just bringing them in if it gets too cold at night.
 

Gabeb123

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After double checking the forecast I think I will probably be better off waiting at least another week before starting the acclimation process. I thought I saw that it was going to be in the 60's and 70's all week but now it's looking like the highs are only in the 50's.
 

Knucklehead

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I still think you guys should be hesitant to speak conclusively about this factor for those of us who's ground temperatures lag significantly behind yours. If I compare years, my yield is significantly affected by growing season length, and it follows that larger seedlings with more roots would be beneficial. My smaller plants added to replace blow downs and cut worm casualties don't seem to catch up to the original planting. Also, if seedling size is irrelevant, why start indoors at all? Why the 6 week rule of thumb?

I don't think it's necessary, but I haven't seen enough evidence to conclude that potting up has no effect, at least for me. And, Minnesota may be more like Alberta than like VA and AL - - I Iived on the Lake of the Woods - - and I wouldn't rule out potting up until more study has been performed.
Great point. About every three years or so we get a dusting of snow that sticks to the car hoods and everybody goes outside to look at it then call our friends to make sure they saw it, too. If there’s any ice it’s like the demolition derby on the roads because nobody knows what to do.
 

deluxestogie

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if seedling size is irrelevant, why start indoors at all? Why the 6 week rule of thumb?
The traditional tobacco growing regions of the US were often defined by those locations where outdoor seed beds (started after last frost) could consume 6 to 8 weeks of the warm weather, yet still leave enough time before first frost to grow, harvest and barn-cure the tobacco. While this was the way it was done for hundreds of years in North America, indoor starting gained acceptance in the early 20th century. [It allowed tobacco farmers to get paid sooner!]

With the advent of indoor starts, growing of tobacco, tomatoes and most other warm-climate vegetables became accessible to those who, in the past, could hope to grow only turnips and cabbages.

My "thumb" is 6 to 8+ weeks long.

Bob
 

Gabeb123

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I got my plants in the ground today in two separate beds. They are probably not the ideal height yet but I'm risking it because the leaves are yellowing a little and they are all bigger than they were last year when I planted outside. I think as long as I can keep my dogs from trampling them I shouldn't have any issues.

20210512_154536_HDR.jpg20210512_154522_HDR.jpg
 

Gabeb123

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Quick update on my plants. Everyone is chugging along as they should despite the heat, drought, and freak hail storm a couple weeks ago. One of my little dutch looked dead after the hail but it looks like it is recovering nicely.
20210618_054419_HDR.jpg20210618_054436_HDR.jpg

Here is a picture of what I suspect is a rustica. I saw a seed packet in my collection that was labeled "sacred tobacco" I have no idea where I got it but I decided I would plant one and see what happens.
20210618_054508_HDR.jpg
 

Gabeb123

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Everything is harvested except my rustica and 4 little dutch that I planted too close to some trees. I'm just going to compost the little dutch because it doesn't look nearly as good as the one little dutch plant I planted further away from the trees.

Here is a picture of my rustica "bush". I just let it grow. The bees seem to love the flowers.
20210922_101922.jpg
 

Oldfella

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Looking at your pictures you have a lovely crop. Re the Bees I noticed that they liked my baccy flowers as well. I think they like the nicotine hit. In NZ and I think Aus, Manuka or Tea Tree honey is produced and is very expensive, perhaps there's a market for Tobacco Honey :unsure:
Oldfella
 

deluxestogie

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Sus bees no son mis bees. I have a neighbor who maintains stacks of bee hives. His honeybees very seldom pay attention to my tobacco blossoms, though bumblebees will occasionally fuss with them. My thought is that the N. tabacum blossoms are so long and narrow, that most bees are unable to reach their nectar. But they can easily reach the anthers, for collecting pollen. By contrast, N. rustica blossoms are short and fat, so that most insects can reach the nectar. But the assorted species of bees in different geographic regions are of different sizes, have different needs, and have different resource alternatives.

Bob
 

Gabeb123

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Here is a picture of my plants hanging. Everything looks pretty much color cured except the black mammoth and a single Lancaster seedleaf plant that I harvested a couple days ago. The black mammoth looks ugly but I'm thinking that is just how dark air cured looks while it is color curing. Now I need to build a kiln.
20211001_082317.jpg
 
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