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Hello from Alberta

deluxestogie

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can I keep them small and healthy for months and then move them out in the spring?
I have successfully kept a number of tobacco plants dwarfed in 3" pots for two years of indoor/outdoor growing. Whenever they got too tall, I clipped off the stalk down to a single leaf node. Eventually, one glorious spring, I transplanted them to the garden bed. Some of these had been completely topped down to about 5" of remaining stalk as many as 5 times. Some of them had even been allowed to bud indoors, prior to being amputated.

Outcome: most of them grew in the field as though it was their very first season of growth. The topping scars were re-modeled to near invisibility. The leaf count, size, yield were reasonably normal for most. I did have a couple of them that died of a heart attack, as soon as they were exposed to the big sky.

Their genetics should remain unaffected by all this, since they are perennials. The issue is that of leaf quality on older plants. The leaf of these seemed fairly average. So they appear to have simply reset their clock.

These are discussed, with photos, in my 2014 Grow Log.

Elderly Tobacco

Bob
 

Havok

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Thanks all, that was helpful and reassuring!

I think I’ll pot up slightly in February so I’m not making too much of a mess of the roots, and then trim them down as required. I had been pinching off the bottom leaves, but Bob, your top down method seems to have worked out just fine.
 

deluxestogie

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"Origins
Until the mid-1980s it was generally accepted that ice hockey derived from English field hockey and Indian lacrosse and was spread throughout Canada by British soldiers in the mid-1800s. Research then turned up mention of a hockeylike game, played in the early 1800s in Nova Scotia by the Mi’kmaq (Micmac) Indians, which appeared to have been heavily influenced by the Irish game of hurling; it included the use of a “hurley” (stick) and a square wooden block instead of a ball. It was probably fundamentally this game that spread throughout Canada via Scottish and Irish immigrants and the British army. The players adopted elements of field hockey, such as the “bully” (later the face-off) and “shinning” (hitting one’s opponent on the shins with the stick or playing with the stick on one “shin” or side); this evolved into an informal ice game later known as shinny or shinty. The name hockey—as the organized game came to be known—has been attributed to the French word hoquet (shepherd’s stick). The term rink, referring to the designated area of play, was originally used in the game of curling in 18th-century Scotland. Early hockey games allowed as many as 30 players a side on the ice, and the goals were two stones, each frozen into one end of the ice. The first use of a puck instead of a ball was recorded at Kingston Harbour, Ontario, Canada, in 1860."



When I was in high school, my 5'2" girlfriend was the hockey goalie. But their hockey required balls.

Bob
 
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