Whole Leaf Tobacco

Home-Made Organic Herb & Pest

HaGGarD

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Sup FTT

Does anyone make their own pestisides at home? Mine is kind of simple, 1 whole garlic clove, 2 ghost peppers, 2 tbs lactos culture.

The vegg matter is put into the blender along with the lactos. To this I add equal parts water and allow to sit with a small air pump moving the water for about 2 weeks. I strain the vegg matter and toss it in the compost pile. Then I dilute about 50-1 with water.

This spray is acutally good for leafy plants, and will stick much better if you add horsetail fennel to your mix. It will dissolve almost any insect on contact, as well as give your plants a kick-start against any pathogen.

What do you think?

HaGGarD
 

HaGGarD

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Yep. Apply it bi-weeklys. I am going to try a fermented kelp meal tea as well. I will do a control to see if their is any change in flavor.

But since I will be foilar feeding as well as drip lines that anything negative should be washed away or made inert.
 

Jitterbugdude

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Sup FTT

It will dissolve almost any insect on contact,
What do you think?

HaGGarD
This is exactly why you should NOT use it. You will be killing so many beneficial insects you'll loose track. What you should do is get yourself a Brix meter. Then use different foliar sprays that will raise the Brix of the plants. When you obtain Brix levels above 10 ( and 12 to 15 is even better) your insect pressure will go away. Ever wonder why if you've never planted cucumbers in your entire life the very first time you do so you get cucumber beetles? Where did they come from and how did they know, all of the sudden that you had cucumber plants? Plants all vibrate and different frequencies. It just so happens that the antennae on insects are able to receive these plant frequencies. When a plant becomes stressed ( as indicated by low Brix levels.. low levels indicate poor plant nutrition) they vibrate at the frequency that the insect can detect. It's been a long time but I think Dr Phil Callahan (spelling?) did a lot of research on the subject. He's also the same guy that did a lot of research on paramagnetism ala rock dust.While your out spending money on a Brix meter, you might as well get an ORP meter, ERGS meter and a good pH meter.

I would also be very wary of spraying a lot of stuff on your tobacco. It soaks up things like a sponge. I do not know if garlic infused tobacco would be fun to smoke... maybe if you are Italian?????
 

FmGrowit

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DeluxeStogie made a comment the other day that gave a lot of merit to planting sacrificial varieties for the bugs to be drawn to and kept away from the preferred plants.

If a home grower is only planting 30 - 50 plants, it would be no problem to correct insect problems by hand. It's when you get into 100's of plants or acres of plants is when large scale solutions are needed. I know a grower who doesn't use anything except BT on three acres. Topping and suckering will reduce the number of aphids along with planting in full sun. Planting too closely will also promote insect infestations.

Grow healthy seedlings. Prepare your soil well to encourage rapid establishment after setting your plants. Monitor for bud worm a couple of weeks after setting. Use BT spray when bud worms are small and actively feeding. Check for aphids often. If you detect aphids early, brush them off. If they're on a sucker, remove the sucker and stomp it into the ground. Aphids become established on tender new growth. Mid-season, you shouldn't have any new growth on your plants.
 

BarG

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I would also be very wary of spraying a lot of stuff on your tobacco. It soaks up things like a sponge. I do not know if garlic infused tobacco would be fun to smoke... maybe if you are Italian?????
You guys crack me up ....Thats some speecy spicy tobbaco....:D Maybe a little tony chacheros also

Take no offense HaGGard, just funnin. welcome to the site.
 

Daniel

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I have seen it mentioned in other places as well. Pests will target weaker plants. The first line if defense against them is to keep plants healthy. I never heard the frequency explanation before. But I suppose it is as good a reason for a bug to know a plant is nto doing well as any.
 

BigBonner

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Last year I used ADMIRE at transplant on my commercial tobacco . I planted my other Burley and other tobacco's that I intend to sell in between the commercial WITHOUT ANY ADMIRE . I never had any white flies or aphids on either crops .
ADMIRE is labled for all kinds of fruits and vegetables even leafy vegetables . It last all season long . It is applied in your transplant water , after that you need no chemicals at all to get rid of white flies or aphids . I know you want organic but this is how commercial tobacco is grown .This may be better than dust and sprays that some home growers are using when soaps and mixes don't work .

Aphids will suck the life out of a tobacco plant .
 

BigBonner

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I see the part about the bees . The test was done directly to the bees . "Dust and wettable powder pesticides tend to be more hazardous to bees than solutions or emulsifiable concentrates for contact pesticides "

When I use it, it is in the transplant water and is covered up at about 4 inches under the soil . Admire is used undrground . Bees would have to dig to find it .
 

durgahands

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Hi,

I am new here but am attracted to this post like a bee to honey!
I heard there is a website devoted to natural pesticides like lavander of the medicinal variety.
If I recall correctly the page is called nothing but flowers; and is consider a botanical tea.
I will try to come back and make sure this post is accurate.
Apparently even Lowes sells this variety of spike lavander; so I need to go get my soil prepared to grow some!

Looking forward to reading more of you all's posts!
Thanks,
D
 

Tom_in_TN

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"Colony Collapse Disorder."
Yeah that is a bad, bad thing. There is a beekeeper living in SW Kentucky who has been keeping honeybees for many years. He stopped applying chemicals to the bees to see what would happen. Well, the 1st winter he lost 95% his hives. Long Story Short, he kept raising more bees every year and over several years he got the over-winter losses down into the 10-15% range. Now, he is selling most of the queen bees he raises each year to Hudson's.

He did notice the 'survivor' bees kept getting meaner and meaner every year.
 

Daniel

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I am setting up two beehives this spring. I have bees ordered for one of them and am expecting them the third week of may. In getting repaired for this I have found there is a lot of things plaguing the bees.
The big three.
Coloney Collapse Disorder (CCD) THis one came up suddenly in teh late 70's early 80's and desimated commercial and hobby beekeepers. Nobody knows what causes it or how to prevent it. you one day go out to check on a hive that was fine a week ago and it is simply gone. THere are plenty of theories such as chemical build up in the hive to viruses. Even Cell Phones have been suspected.

Small Hive Beetle (SHB) basically a tiny beetle that it attracted to the hive where it lives in the honey stores of the bees. the problem is they will overrun the hive is left unchecked and they also destroy whatever honey they do not eat. Bees recognize they are in a loosing situation and will find a new home or starve trying to hold on. Basically this is a paracite that will attack it's host until it destroys itself.

Varroa Mite, What woudl equal the lungs in other animals are known as the Varroa organs in the Honey Bee. the Varroa mite is a mocroscopis parasite that lives in the Varroa of the Honey Bee. just like any other respiratory infection the bee will eventually die. Varroa infestation can be monitored and treated. In most cases the hives are lost I consider it more an issue of lax management and care rather than a plague. In addition the loss of a hive to Varroa mites is actually a secondary effect caused by bees that are sick or weak from mite infection. In short bees only live so long and the last part of there life is spent foraging. A typical healthy bee will be able to forage for a failry specific period of time. A sick bee will have this period of time reduced significantly. Short lived foragers cause the foraging population in the hive to drop. forcing younger and younger bees to convert to foraging mode. This eventually impacts the entire social network of the hive right up until larva, or the next generation of bees are not adequately tended to and the hive dies off.

Couple the above with additional issues such as neighbors spraying pesticides etc and the bees are getting walloped pretty hard. ON the beekeeping site I visit it is not unusual to see people mention anywhere from 50 to 100% loses in their hives. THis year so far sems to be a fairly good one for the bees. The biggest losses so far seem to be from hives that may have gone into winter with a light Varroa infestation and the warm winter has allowed those mites to kill off the hive. You need to understand that in the colder weather a beekeepers hands are tied they cannot open up the hive to help the bees out. The best you can do is hope the colony can hold on unitl you get a warm enough day to pop the top and give them some aid.
 
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