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Homemade Bread Thread

Knucklehead

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Here is mine.
Recipe by Becky Richardson from allrecipes.com
Starter:
3 tablespoons potato flakes
3 tablespoons white sugar
1 cup warm water
2-1/4 teaspoons dry active yeast

Directions:
1. Combine potato flakes, sugar, water, and yeast in a covered container. Let the starter sit on a counter for 5 days, stirring daily with a wooden spoon.
2. On the morning of the fifth day, feed the starter with 3 tablespoons potato flakes, 3 tablespoons sugar, and 1 cup warm water. In the evening, take out 1 cup of the starter to use in bread. Refrigerate the remaining starter.
3. Every five days, feed the starter as before. If the starter is to be used for bread, let the fed starter rest at room temperature for 6 hours. If not, keep refrigerated and discard 1 cup after each feeding.

Sourdough bread. From ladies at church.
The recipe calls for Bread Flour but I prefer All Purpose Flour as it gives a lighter texture and a thin slightly crispy crust. The bread flour yields a heavier body and thicker chewy crust. I prefer the AP for sandwiches.

After feeding and splitting the starter, add 1/2 cup sugar, 1/2 cup oil, 1-1/4 teaspoons salt, 1-1/2 cups warm water. Stir this up very thoroughly.

Pour this liquid over 6 heaping cups of flour (bread or AP flour) and mix thoroughly. You do not need to sift the flour. Dough will be very stiff. Put into large bowl and cover with a damp towel. Let it rise in the bowl overnight. Next morning, punch down and divide into three parts. Knead separately and place into three greased loaf pans. Cover with towel and let rise to top of pan, approx. 6-12 hours. Bake at 350 degrees until done approx. 25 minutes for a dark pan. I have found that a light pan takes several more minutes in the oven than a dark pan.

Whip up some of my Chili Cooks Burger recipe and serve it over bread slice.
 
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GreenDragon

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We have one sourdough that's been going for about 10 years now that lives in a mason jar in the fridge. Once a month, we take it out and add 1/2 cup powdered milk, 1/2 cup dry mashed potato flakes, and 1 cup bread flour. Add water to make a thick soup. Let ferment for a day, use half to make bread, put the other half back in the mason jar and put back in fridge. You can start it by using the wild yeast method, or jump start using a packet of yeast and a tablespoon of yogurt or sour cream (adds the lactobaccillus).

I've also "started" a wild yeast rye sourdough starter this week that I'm using right now in it's first batch of bread. I used fresh ground organic rye berries, some potato water leftover from dinner, some dry mashed potato flakes, and a few crushed grapes. Took about four days for it to really get going, using the traditional method of replacing half of the starter each day with fresh flour etc.

Recipes? Don't use 'em any more. If I want crusty bread I just use bread flour, water, salt, and starter. If I want soft bread for sandwiches I substitute milk and add 2 TB of oil and a TB of sugar. Sometimes I throw in an egg yolk. I do occasionally like to make a loaf using a large finely grated carrot, a 2 tsp of Red Pepper Flakes, and 1 tsp of ground black pepper. Makes a beautiful orange colored loaf that is delicious (and does not taste like carrots) .
 

GreenDragon

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Here are the two starters and the freshly mixed dough.
82E0D26E-B816-4F9B-A407-33BA343CF521.jpeg
Here is the completed loaf after the wife and kids got into it while it was cooling. It tasted great, with butter and honey. Had a slight cheesy taste that I liked, and was probably due to contamination from the wife’s cheese cultures.
9BC290DE-15E8-4999-8D5B-BC3286E158DF.jpeg
 

Charly

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This thread is a good idea !
When I will be more confident about what I am doing I will add my recipe ;)
 

Knucklehead

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Starter Started



I have no idea what this will turn into. I added:
  • 1 tbsp of masa harina
  • 1 tbsp of bread flour
  • 1 tbsp of sugar
  • enough water to make a thick slurry
It's just sitting out on my kitchen counter.

Bob
I started new starter Saturday. The lady from church brought starter but I had no potato flakes to feed the starter so I made bread with it. The Sidewinder went to get groceries Saturday so she picked up potato flakes and I made new starter. It has to sit five days before I can feed it, split it, and make bread.
 

MarcL

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Yes, please. It looks great.
Ingredients
  • 5 1/2 cups flour, you may need less or a little more

  • 2 tablespoons yeast

  • 1 tablespoon honey

  • 1/4 cup warm water

  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt

  • 1/4 teaspoon baking powder

  • 2 1/4 cups warm milk
Butter and cornmeal for greasing and dusting the pans
 

ChinaVoodoo

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We were gifted a Budweiser beer bread kit once. No yeast. It was delicious. I might try something like that. Anyone have a recipe?
 

Knucklehead

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We were gifted a Budweiser beer bread kit once. No yeast. It was delicious. I might try something like that. Anyone have a recipe?
I just Googled Budweiser Beer Bread. There were dozens of recipes of various kinds. I saw one made with brown sugar. Perhaps you could read some and get an idea of the flavors from the bread you tasted. Some were similar but slightly different.
 

MarcL

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I've been asked to make up some blends along the way of grains/hops and stuff. ....not what I'm doing but, I'm in it or maybe more to the point of can't escape it?
I think I can get you some stuff for sure. I can say that there was some kits to start out with but, many pounds of stuff have been acquired since then.

EDIT..oops I thought you meant beer..am I drinking to much..no,I haven't been drinking.
 

ChinaVoodoo

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I've been asked to make up some blends along the way of grains/hops and stuff. ....not what I'm doing but, I'm in it or maybe more to the point of can't escape it?
I think I can get you some stuff for sure. I can say that there was some kits to start out with but, many pounds of stuff have been acquired since then.

EDIT..oops I thought you meant beer..am I drinking to much..no,I haven't been drinking.
That was a whirlwind.
 

deluxestogie

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It's been about three weeks since I started this sourdough starter. Although I have one remaining packet of commercial yeast, I had decided that it would be a good idea to get my native, deluxe yeast up and running.

This batch began with bleached white bread flour and masa harina, with some added sugar. I had been leaving it on the kitchen counter. It occasionally showed a few, diminutive bubbles. I continued to feed it: whole wheat flour; bleached bread flour; masa harina; molasses; brown sugar. It was pretty unimpressive. Maybe I keep my house so impeccably clean that there just are no wild yeast here?

April and May so far have been unseasonably cool. So my kitchen counter has been unseasonably cool. A couple of days ago, it dawned on me to move the sourdough starter into my study, which I always keep at 76°F. There's not much of anywhere to put it in there. I just set it on a stack of books.

The photo above is from this morning. The horizontal marker indicates where the starter came to when I went to bed last night. It looks like today is the day to make some deluxe sourdough bread. I'll use half the starter (then put it to bed in the fridge). The bread will be half bleached bread flour and half whole wheat. The kneaded dough may need to rest in my study overnight in order to rise.

Bob
 

Knucklehead

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It's been about three weeks since I started this sourdough starter. Although I have one remaining packet of commercial yeast, I had decided that it would be a good idea to get my native, deluxe yeast up and running.

This batch began with bleached white bread flour and masa harina, with some added sugar. I had been leaving it on the kitchen counter. It occasionally showed a few, diminutive bubbles. I continued to feed it: whole wheat flour; bleached bread flour; masa harina; molasses; brown sugar. It was pretty unimpressive. Maybe I keep my house so impeccably clean that there just are no wild yeast here?

April and May so far have been unseasonably cool. So my kitchen counter has been unseasonably cool. A couple of days ago, it dawned on me to move the sourdough starter into my study, which I always keep at 76°F. There's not much of anywhere to put it in there. I just set it on a stack of books.

The photo above is from this morning. The horizontal marker indicates where the starter came to when I went to bed last night. It looks like today is the day to make some deluxe sourdough bread. I'll use half the starter (then put it to bed in the fridge). The bread will be half bleached bread flour and half whole wheat. The kneaded dough may need to rest in my study overnight in order to rise.

Bob
Thank you for your bread photo. It led me back to Lulu where I was able to locate three more books by my favorite author, including the sequel to Counterspell. I had been waiting on that one for years, I thought the project had been shelved indefinitely. I think I’ll have a slice of my own homemade bread with some cheese on it to celebrate.
 

Moth

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My current starter is about 3 years old. Nothing special, just flour and water.
20200402_195229.jpg


20200324_213121.jpg

Recipe
600g strong white flour
350g water with teaspoon of salt
150g of sourdough starter
Weigh and kinda mix it.
When it's doubled in size,(4 to 6 hours) knock back and put in a banneton (wicker basket)
When it has risen (1 to 3 hrs) and looks ready*, flip it on baking paper, on a pizza stone, in a hot oven (250c) for 15 mins, then reduce temp to 200c for another 15 ish.
Keep a dish of water in the oven while cooking for high humidity.

*"looks ready". Sounds like some arcane instruction my pa' would give me with a recipe... This has taken years to get the feel of what "ready" is. Depends. If the dough over proofs in the basket , it sinks in the oven. If under proofed, it won't rise fully. Depending on the flour, gluten formation and hydration, there's a sweet spot where the dough will double in size ish in the oven. Using baking yeast is easy, getting it right with sourdough took ages to consistently do.

I can't verbalise what ready is, but with practice, you can spot it easily.

I've been working from home for the past few months, so have been baking bread a few times a week, instead of weekly.

It's turned what was a previously relaxing and fun activity with my little girl into a chore.

I was lucky enough to have a sack (25kg) of flour before shortages started, as I shop in bulk as a cost saving strategy. This one has been a life saver.
 

deluxestogie

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Sour Dough Whole Wheat Bread -- Halfway There



This was supposed to be a loaf of sandwich bread. But after going into the oven, the dough just never rose much further.

The dough had risen overnight. I punched it down, allowed it to rise again for about 6 hours, then plopped it into the oven.



A slice of this weighs about the same as banana bread, and has the chewing consistency of dark pumpernickel or Pepperidge Farms canape bread. The aroma is somewhat sour and interesting. It tastes wonderful. But this was not what I had intended.

I was afraid to allow the second leavening to go more than six hours, since the yeast (feeding on the flour constituents) eventually liquefies the dough.

Bob
 
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