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TheNewestOldtimer

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I think that it might be unrealistic getting retail price for 50 acres of whole leaf without a lot of help distributing.

Yes it would be, but it would also be unrealistic to think I could grow the whole 50 acre plot. '

Next year I will plant about 2.5 acres to get a feel for it.
 

TheNewestOldtimer

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If I were going to grow commercially I'd start by pm'ing BigBonner. Second I'd get him to start the plants for me, and purchase them from him.

I can start seedlings early no problem. I do understand that it will be a lot of seedlings, but I have the greenhouse with supplemental lighting to start them. I also have the time to go through that many seedlings.
 

Mad Oshea

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Tobacco is a sticky buiss.- Folks are like pigions, They dont like to get their wings sticky. I'll stay hobby. To much work in sales for Me to control. Good luck on givin it a shot.
 

TheNewestOldtimer

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Does anybody have any experience using mycorrhizal fungi?

I have seen people using them for growning corn, but would they help tobacco yield?

On corn they usually boost yield about 20%.
 

TheNewestOldtimer

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am now starting to build my plans for a curing barn it is 1000 square feet. I want to know how tall it should be for 3 tiers? Any help would be appreciated.
 

jekylnz

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am now starting to build my plans for a curing barn it is 1000 square feet. I want to know how tall it should be for 3 tiers? Any help would be appreciated.

Have you seen the way they do it on some baccy farms these days. .no barns..it would work out cheaper and easier I reckon. .you wouldn't nessasarily need the harvesting gear...but the portable curing set up looks ideal. .abit of pine and some black polythene.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o0cq6Ge1TOc&feature=youtube_gdata_player
 

Southern Planter

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am now starting to build my plans for a curing barn it is 1000 square feet. I want to know how tall it should be for 3 tiers? Any help would be appreciated.

The wagon is about 3 feet off the ground, the wagon man loads tier one, then tosses over his head to tier two man who tosses over his head to tier three man, about 27 to 30 feet to the lower eaves of the roof. The quality of the tobacco in such a barn is vastly greater to the stuff cured in a fenceline plastic jury rig.
 

TheNewestOldtimer

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Thank you.

I figured that I will need 750 square feet, and 3 tiers for the estimated harvest on 2 acres. So I figure that 1000 feet should do it because the harvest estimates are low balls. If I still have overflow I can put it up in my green house.
 

BigBonner

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Thank you.

I figured that I will need 750 square feet, and 3 tiers for the estimated harvest on 2 acres. So I figure that 1000 feet should do it because the harvest estimates are low balls. If I still have overflow I can put it up in my green house.

For burley . I have one barn that is 40 ' X 60 ' three tires high and it will hold 3 acres if hung tightly , 26 sticks per rail . 2400 square ft .
 

BigBonner

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@BigBonner

How many pounds do you get off those 3 acres?

The answer is the good , bad and ugly .
3 Acres
Good year 7500 Lbs
Bad year 4200 Lbs
Ugly 0 Total loss

This year in one 10 acre field I lost over half of it to heavy rain that set in for several days .
Last year was a severe drought with extreme heat and I averaged around 2000 pounds per acre more or less .
My top year was around 3600 pounds per acre .
Tobacco will grow differently each year .
 

TheNewestOldtimer

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First off thanks for the help.

I will not have to worry too much about droughts here. This year we had a really bad drought, but we still got very high yields.

We irrigate our fields like crazy. It does not matter if you don't get an inch of rain in the whole year, because we have a nearly unlimited amount of water underground. The agricultural wells are shallow, and refill as fast as we can pump.

Heavy rain fall might be an issue here. how does it kill the plants? does it drown them, or does it break the leafs?

Also if it gets hot, but it has enough water will the plant do fine? Some years we average about 95f top temp in the summer, but others we go 105-110 very often. Most years we go close to breaking, or break 100 everyday in the mid summer.

Also during certain times of the year we have high winds, and tornadoes.

The other thing that have to worry about is crop dusters. I will try to put my plot in the corner that does not back up aginst farm fields.
 

jekylnz

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First off thanks for the help.

I will not have to worry too much about droughts here. This year we had a really bad drought, but we still got very high yields.

We irrigate our fields like crazy. It does not matter if you don't get an inch of rain in the whole year, because we have a nearly unlimited amount of water underground. The agricultural wells are shallow, and refill as fast as we can pump.

Heavy rain fall might be an issue here. how does it kill the plants? does it drown them, or does it break the leafs?

Also if it gets hot, but it has enough water will the plant do fine? Some years we average about 95f top temp in the summer, but others we go 105-110 very often. Most years we go close to breaking, or break 100 everyday in the mid summer.

Also during certain times of the year we have high winds, and tornadoes.

The other thing that have to worry about is crop dusters. I will try to put my plot in the corner that does not back up aginst farm fields.

What are they spreading? Its probably urea aye..?High winds and tornados dont sound too good. .bb may be able to add more to this but..tobacco doesn't like wet feet..and wilk end up drowning..they pretty draught resistant. .to an extent though. .they definitely like it dryer than wetter
 

BigBonner

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First off thanks for the help.

I will not have to worry too much about droughts here. This year we had a really bad drought, but we still got very high yields.

We irrigate our fields like crazy. It does not matter if you don't get an inch of rain in the whole year, because we have a nearly unlimited amount of water underground. The agricultural wells are shallow, and refill as fast as we can pump.

Heavy rain fall might be an issue here. how does it kill the plants? does it drown them, or does it break the leafs?

Also if it gets hot, but it has enough water will the plant do fine? Some years we average about 95f top temp in the summer, but others we go 105-110 very often. Most years we go close to breaking, or break 100 everyday in the mid summer.

Also during certain times of the year we have high winds, and tornadoes.

The other thing that have to worry about is crop dusters. I will try to put my plot in the corner that does not back up aginst farm fields.


Heavy rain will drown tobacco if it hits and stays around for a few days .
If you have a lot of wind then that may be your biggest concern . Tobacco blows down easy , I do mean easy . A blow down field is nearly impossible to harvest and it will rot in a matter of a few days laying in a tangled mess .
DSCN3330.jpg

You say you can afford a loss if it comes along but in my shoes a loss is hard for me to recover from . The ten acre field I invested over $12,000 in it and I won't sell enough tobacco to cover 3/4 of the money I invested .

The tobacco in the picture did not recover and died totally out .The picture was taken across the rows .
 

skychaser

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We irrigate our fields like crazy. It does not matter if you don't get an inch of rain in the whole year, because we have a nearly unlimited amount of water underground. The agricultural wells are shallow, and refill as fast as we can pump. .

That's the best scenario you can have in my opinion. Summers here are hot and dry too. Not quite as hot as where you are but we get into the mid 90's most summer days and can go for 3 months without a drop of rain at that time of year. We have two wells and can pump more water than we could ever use and never run dry. So that means I get to control how much and when it "rains".

The other thing that have to worry about is crop dusters. I will try to put my plot in the corner that does not back up aginst farm fields.

Tobacco is VERY sensitive to herbicides like Glyphosate and 2-4-D. You want them in a place where there is no chance of drift.
 

Knucklehead

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Tobacco will wilt during the day and stand back up at night. That's normal, so don't take it as a sign that they need water. Over watering is one of the most common ways for a grower to kill his tobacco. A good way to stunt the plants growth is to look at them too often. :rolleyes:
 

TheNewestOldtimer

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What are they spreading? Its probably urea aye..?

No, and if they were I would not care.

I am talking about 2,4-d and Glyphosate, because tobacco hates those herbicides.

For fertilizer here we don't use pure urea for our flied to damn expensive. We tend to use ammonium nitrate, and UAN for nitrogen. We also use ammonia to an extent.
 
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